Archives Directory for the History of Collecting in America

Archives related to: Heye, George G.(George Gustav), 1874-1957

titleHandwritten note on Fred Harvey General Office Indian Department letterhead relating to Hopi Collection for Mr. Heye
repositoryHeard Museum
collection titleHandwritten note on Fred Harvey thunderbird letterhead to Mr. Heye in regard to Hopi material

Original format
Handwritten accounts on letterhead

Acquisition note
Artificial subject collection assembled from a variety of sources by the Museum staff.
extentSee repository for details
formatsNotes
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
record sourcehttp://cdm262401.cdmhost.com/u?/p262401coll004,144
acquisition informationArtificial subject collection assembled from a variety of sources by the Museum staff.
updated02/07/2020 18:20:35
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titleJoseph Keppler Jr. Iroquois papers, 1882-1944.
repositoryCornell University Libraries
collection titlePrimarily letters to Keppler, including a record of events and people at the Tonawanda and Cattaraugus reservations, among others, over the first part of the twentieth century. Well known correspondents include noted Seneca scholar, Arthur C. Parker; artist Jesse Cornplanter; and Mohawk poet E. Pauline Johnson.

Other parts of the collection include newspaper clippings on Iroquois subjects, government documents, Seneca vocabulary collected by Keppler, and other miscellaneous documents related to the Iroquois and the Six Nations. Newspaper clippings, obituaries, pamphlets, photographs, and notes are included with the correspondence.

Other information includes correspondence about the collection itself, biographic information about the correspondents, clippings and documents regarding New York State land claims by the Caughnawagas and Saint Regis Indians, The New York State Museum, genealogic information, obituaries, clippings about the Wanamaker National Indian Memorial, photographs of a silver cross pendent, and correspondence regarding Iroquois masks.

Bio/History:
Udo Keppler was a political cartoonist for Puck Magazine, and an avid collector of Indian artifacts as well as being an Indian activist. He changed his name to Joseph Keppler, Jr. in honor of his father. He was elected honorary chief of Seneca and given the name Gyantwaka.

He actively promoted Iroquois lacrosse teams, and his connections with the railroad enabled him to procure discount railroad passes for New York Indians, especially those travelling to Canada on Confederacy business. On the national scene, Keppler worked with others to defeat or substantially modify proposed legislation to allot the New York State reservations.

Preferred citation:
Joseph Keppler Jr. Iroquois papers, #9184. Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library./ Provenance: Huntington Free Library. Gift to HFL from Joseph Keppler, 1943.
extent3 cubic ft. ; 3 boxes.
formatsClippings Correspondence Financial Records Legal Papers Photographs
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
record linkhttp://rmc.library.cornell.edu/EAD/htmldocs/RMM09184.html
record sourcehttp://www.library.cornell.edu/
acquisition informationHuntington Free Library. Gift to HFL from Joseph Keppler, 1943.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:12
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titleNotes made or collected by Lieutenant Allyn Capron, 1884-1896.
repositoryCornell University Libraries
collection titleThis collection of letters and notes relates to Geronimo and other Chiricahua Apache prisoners of war. The letters were written at Mount Vernon Barracks and Fort Sill and include documents signed by Geronimo. There is some documentation of the Apache culture.

Provenance note from Agnes K. Capron, wife of Allyn Capron, dated March 26, 1938, to George Gustav Heye. Notes by Capron, 7 pages and copies of notes about Apache culture, legends, religion, thoughts about white men. 5 leaves of notes by Capron taken at Camp Apache, Fort Sill, Oklahoma, 1890, discussing the Apache medicine mask and legend of the medicine hat and chief. Note discussing interview with Geronimo about his childhood, and fights with Mexicans.

Letter from Mount Vernon Barracks, dated July 3, 1894, from Capron giving statistics and information, living conditions, about Apaches living in the camp for the month of June. Additional note, same as previous, for October 1895. Letter from Lt. William Wallace Wotherspoon from Mount Vernon, presumably to Capron, dated September 30, 1891, same as previous, statistics for September 1891.

Letter from Capron at Apache Camp, Fort Sill, Oklahoma, September 1, 1895 to Captain Hugh L. Scott, same as previous for the month of August 1895, mentions Geronimo specifically. Note from Capron, presumably from Mount Vernon, describing the surrender and transfer to Mount Vernon of the Chiricahua and Warm Springs Apache and Geronimo. This letter makes note of white women who were living with the tribe.

Additional note from an undecipherable person to Capron, similar to previous. Also included in collection are two receipts from 1896, one to Scott, one to Capron, for payments for police services rendered; these are signed by Geronimo.


Biographical/Historical Note:
Captain Allyn K. Capron, a graduate of West Point, was a Rough Rider who served under Captain Hugh L. Scott as Lieutenant and Captain in charge of Indian prisoners of war with the 7th Calvary. He died from the effects of exposure during the Spanish American War in 1898.

Hugh L. Scott, a graduate of West Point with a degree from Columbia, served with the 9th and 7th Calvary. He was in charge of Geronimo’s band of Apache Indians from 1894 to 1897. He later succeeded William W. Wotherspoon as Chief of Staff of the United States Army.

Notes:
Forms part of the Native American Collection. (NAC)
Digitized for the Vanished Worlds, Enduring People exhibition.

Cite As:
Notes made or collected by Lieutenant Allyn Capron, #9015. Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library.

Location: Kroch Library Rare & Manuscripts (Non-Circulating)
Call Number: Archives
9015

extent14 items.
formatsCorrespondence
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
record sourcehttps://catalog.library.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=5620482&DB=local
acquisition informationHuntington Free Library. Gift to HFL from Agnes Kissam Capron, March 1938.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:12
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titleAt a council held at Edward [unreadable] 1712 May 19.
repositoryCornell University Libraries
collection titlePhotostat of a document purportedly by James Logan giving an account of a meeting. The document illustrates 34 wampum belts, presented by the Delaware Indian delegation, and gives their meanings.

The place where the meeting was held appears to start with Edward or Edwards, but the remainder of the word is not decipherable. The council was presumably held somewhere near Philadelphia Pennsylvania. Other individuals attending the meeting included Edward Shippen, Richard Hill, and other members of the government.

Also included with the Photostats are two letters from 1942 between Julian P. Boyd, who was a librarian at Princeton, Edwin K. Burnett, and George G. Heye. Their letters discuss the manuscript and the whereabouts of the wampum belts mentioned in the manuscript. Boyd states that the original manuscript may have been purchased earlier that year by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

Biographical/Historical Note:
Edward Shippen was mayor and treasurer of Philadelphia Pennsylvania.
James Logan was Secretary to Pennsylvania founder William Penn.

Cite As: At a council held at Edward, #9124. Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library.

Location: Kroch Library Rare & Manuscripts (Non-Circulating)
Call Number: Archives
9124
extent6 pages.
formatsNotes
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
record sourcehttps://catalog.library.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=5733845&DB=local
updated11/12/2014 11:30:12
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titleConferences held with Indians at Easton, 1756.
repositoryCornell University Libraries
collection titleUnbound notes from a conference held in July and November 1756, with two previous messages sent by the government to the Indians residing on the Susquehanna, and their answers thereto. Include information about who was in attendance, things that were exchanged, and what transpired.

Biographical/Historical Note:
According to Mr. Julian F. Boyd, Librarian of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, who viewed this document on October 1, 1938, with Mr. Carl Van Doren, this is am accurate, clerk’s copy of the original minutes of the conference, corrected in the handwriting of Mr. Richard Peters, Secretary of the conference.

Cite As:
Conferences held with Indians at Easton, #9148. Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library.

Notes:
Published in Colonial Records of Pennsylvania, volume 7.

Associated documentation folder contains, invoice from the Museum of the American Indian signed by George Heye, and other provenance information, in collection #9209.

Forms part of the Native American Collection. (NAC)

Photocopies and microfilm available.

Location: Kroch Library Rare & Manuscripts (Non-Circulating)
Call Number: Archives
9148 Bd. Ms. ++


Notes:
Originals with Bd. Mss., photocopies in Box 13. Additional material available in 9209.


Location: Olin Library
Call Number: Film 8660
extent49 p.
formatsNotes Photocopies Microfilm
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
record sourcehttps://catalog.library.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=5733891&DB=local
acquisition informationHuntington Free Library. HFL purchased with the Fort Pitt conference minutes manuscript, #9147, for $100, 1933.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:12
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titleGeorge G. Heye autograph collection, 1886-1928.
repositoryCornell University Libraries
collection titleCollection of autographs of individuals associated with George Gustav Heye, Frederick W. Hodge, and Indians of North America.

Correspondence to George Gustav Heye and Frederick W. Hodge, on various subjects. Some letters are not addressed to Heye or Hodge, but they likely collected them. Letters appear to have been collected and saved for the signatures of the writers. Signatures include many late nineteenth century and early twentieth century anthropologists, archaeologists, ethnologists, and individuals otherwise connected to Indians of North America.

Some of the signatures are on cards; most are in correspondence that relates to the institutes, including the Bureau of American Ethnology, the Smithsonian, the Museum of the American Indian, Carnegie Museum, United States National Museum, Public Museum of the City of Milwaukee, Archaeological Institute of America, and their collections.

Contents also include a song, notes about the Kiowa and Tanoan Indians, information about articles for American Anthropologist, requests for information from various books about Indians, and a National Certificate from the Cherokee Nation. In some cases there are multiple letters from one person.

Notes:
Forms part of the Native American Collection. (NAC) For additional letters from individuals in this collection see collection 9065, Correspondence received by Frederick Webb Hodge.

Location: Kroch Library Rare & Manuscripts (Non-Circulating)
Call Number: Archives
9063

Cite As:
George G. Heye autograph collection, #9063. Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library.
extent1 folder.
formatsCorrespondence
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
record linkhttp://rmc.library.cornell.edu/ead/htmldocs/RMM09063.html
record sourcehttps://catalog.library.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=5678793&DB=local
finding aidonline and in repository
acquisition informationHuntington Free Library.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:13
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titleJournal of a trip from New Haven to the Missouri River area, ca. 1833.
repositoryCornell University Libraries
collection titleDiary describing life with the Pawenee Indians. The diary is referred to only as the Ellsworth diary.

The author of the diary and date are unknown, but it is attributed to E. A. Ellsworth, ca. 1833. Also, two letters between Paul Bilhuber and George G. Heye discussing the donation of the diary to the Museum of the American Indian.

Notes:
See also collection #9203 and the book Irving, John Treat, Indian sketches taken during an expedition to the Pawnee tribes. E99.P3 I72.

Forms part of the Native American Collection. (NAC)

Location: Kroch Library Rare & Manuscripts (Non-Circulating)
Call Number: Archives
9037

extent3 items
formatsJournals
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
record sourcehttps://catalog.library.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=5652425&DB=local
acquisition informationHuntington Free Library. Gift to HFL from Paul Bilhuber, May 24, 1930.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:13
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titleLetters of Captain Alexander B. MacGowan, 1862-1887.
repositoryCornell University Libraries
collection titleMost letters are addressed to his wife and his son, George P. MacGowan, with some other correspondence as well.

Other correspondents include Mrs. S. E. K. Ames, Rev. Cyrus Hamlin, and Mrs. George W. Hazel, who was MacGowan’s sister. Letters from George P. MacGowan to George G. Heye, letter to George MacGowan from Paul D. Moody, President of Middlebury College, VT. Report of Operations by E. A. Carr at Fort Apache mentioning MacGowan’s gallant acts. Telegram from E. A. Carr at Fort Apache to General Wilcox mentioning MacGowan’s service.

Most of the letters are postmarked from within the Arizona Territory or what is now Arizona. Many are from Fort Apache; some come from New Mexico, Idaho, and Wyoming, including San Pedro Crossing, Fort Barrett, Mimbres River, Turkey Creek Hill, La Mesilla, Goose Creek, and Cienega de Suez. Letters relate to the Indian Wars, describe the conditions of traveling to find Indians.

Descriptions of the land and the wildlife include an account of finding an unknown species of diving bird. Later letters to George include college and life advice for him while he is a student at Middlebury College. Newspaper clipping of a news article about Camp Thomas and the Arizona Apache that mentions Captain MacGowan. The letters give detail on the fights between the troops and the Indians. Collection contains an index of the letters.

Biographical/Historical Note:
Captain Alexander MacGowan served with the Twelfth Infantry and was Provost Marshall in charge of Indian prisoners at Fort Apache. He actively fought against Indian rebellions in Arizona and was recognized for his actions in battle.

In Arizona Indian and Government relations during the 1880s were very turbulent. It was from Fort Apache that Indians such as Geronimo were pursued.

Notes:
Forms part of the Native American Collection. (NAC)

Location: Kroch Library Rare & Manuscripts (Non-Circulating)
Call Number: Archives
9046


Cite As:
Letters of Captain Alexander B. MacGowan, #9046. Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library.
extent34 items.
formatsCorrespondence
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
record sourcehttps://catalog.library.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=5670949&DB=local
acquisition informationHuntington Free Library. Gift to HFL from Mrs. George P. MacGowan, 1935.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:13
....................................................................


titleLetters to George and Thea Heye from Lorenzo Chavez and other Zuni Pueblo Indians, 1916-1930.
repositoryCornell University Libraries
collection titleIncludes letters from Lorenzo Chavez, Natusey, Tom Kawaya, Harry Shusta, Herman Fryling, Bessie C. Boomshe, and others.

Typed diary of a visit to New York City by Lorenzo Chavez and Waihusiwa, who stayed with Mr. and Mrs. George Heye, January to February 1923, includes description of places visited, including the Mauretania. Newspaper clippings covering the visit and a treatment of Chavez’s blindness.

Correspondence from Zuni Mission Station Day School from Herman Fryling.

Biographical/Historical Note:
George Heye was the President of the Museum of the American Indian.
Summary:

Cite As:
Letters to George and Thea Heye from Lorenzo Chavez and other Zuni Pueblo Indians, #9062. Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library.

Notes:
Forms part of the Native American Collection. (NAC)

Location: Kroch Library Rare & Manuscripts (Non-Circulating)
Call Number: Archives
9062
extent1 folder.
formatsCorrespondence Diaries
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
record sourcehttps://catalog.library.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=5678797&DB=local
acquisition informationHuntington Free Library. Notes on the visit of Zuni Indians to New York City found among Mrs. Heye’s effects and turned over to the HFL by Mr. Burnett, October 1935.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:13
....................................................................


titleReginald Pelham Bolton collection: notes regarding Indians near Inwood Hill Park, New York City, 1900-1935.
repositoryCornell University Libraries
collection titleCollection includes notebook by Bolton titled "Notes on discoveries and index to aboriginal objects with location of discovery, collected by W. L. Calver, with some collected in 1907-7-8-9 by W.L.C. and R. P. Bolton."

Field notebook by Alanson Skinner from 1918 titled "Field Notes" has "Notes on the great shellheap at Cold Spring, Inwood" as first entry, but the book goes on to describe other Indian excavation sites across New York State, including sites in Jefferson, Orange, and Cayuga Counties, Tar Island, and Red Lake near the Canadian border. Notebooks contain sketches of the burial sites and information about the artifacts found within.

Photo album of Inwood Park, including photos of various places in the park, of the Tulip Tree, Seaman Drake Estate, Van Cortlandt Mansion, Spuytrn Duyvil creek, and Dyckman Institute library.

Also, newspaper clippings regarding Indians of Inwood, sketches, photo of the Museum of American Indian exhibit by W. C. Orchard, and photos of the surrounding area including pictures of houseboats and local buildings like the Jewish Memorial Hospital. Album ends with a poem titled Inwood Park - October, by Miss Evelyn Byrd. Many of the photos in the album are from Frank S. Savastano photography.

Also three folders with maps and manuscripts. Folder one contains a paper by W. L. Calver and Bolton titled "Discovery of an Indian human burial at Inwood", dated Sunday, August 25, 1907; letter from George Heye to Mrs. Bolton thanking her for the gift; and correspondence, dated 1907, from Bolton and Edward Hagman Hall, the secretary of the American Scenic and Historic Preservation Society, to Calver, discussing the shell pockets.

Folder two contains newspaper clippings and photos about Inwood Park.

Folder three contains hand drawn map of Inwood Park and Van Cortlandt Park by J. B. James and blueprint maps by Bolton.

Biographical/Historical Note:
Bolton was an author and archaeologist who studied the Washington Heights and Inwood region of New York extensively. He was a life Member of the New York Historical Society and of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation.

Notes: Forms part of the Native American Collection. (NAC)

Location: Kroch Library Rare & Manuscripts (Non-Circulating)
Call Number: Archives
9117


Cite As: Reginald Pelham Bolton collection, #9117. Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library.
extent3 v. and 3 folders.
formatsNotebooks Photograph Album Clippings Map Manuscript
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
record sourcehttps://catalog.library.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=5701020&DB=local
acquisition informationHuntington Free Library. Gift to Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation from Mrs. Reginald Pelham Bolton, 1942.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:13
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titleTestimonial for giving Indians medals, engraved by Henry Dawkins, 1946.
repositoryCornell University Libraries
collection titleReprint of a William Johnson Indian testimonial used for giving medals to Indians, printed from the original copper plate.

The print is in a folder that states "On the occasion of the visit of the Walpole Society to the New York Historical Society on May 25, 1946 there were made from the original copperplate owned by the latter Society, fifty impressions of Sir William Johnson’s Indian Testimonial, engraved by Henry Dawkins of Philadelphia in the month of April 1770 and originally designed to accompany the presentation of Royal medals to the Indians."

The print has blanks where the names of the awardees, their particulars, and the date would be filled in. It comes with a letter of provenance from George Heye saying that it is an acknowledgement in recognition of a gift made to the Museum of the American Indian by the New York Historical Society.

Cite As:
Testimonial for giving Indians medals, engraved by Henry Dawkins, #9100. Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library.

Notes:
Forms part of the Native American Collection. (NAC).

Location: Kroch Library Rare & Manuscripts (Non-Circulating)
Call Number: Archives
9100
extent3 items.
formatsReproductions
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
record sourcehttps://catalog.library.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=5693775&DB=local
acquisition informationHuntington Free Library.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:13
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titleTreaty of peace with the Delaware Nation, also documentation and supplemental treaty, 1765.
repositoryCornell University Libraries
collection titleTreaty of peace with the Delaware Nation entered into by their deputies before Sir William Johnson, baronet, His Majesty’s sole agent and superintendent of Indian affairs in the Northern Department of North America...May 8 1765.

With supplemental treaty, which was bound to the main treaty, titled The Delaware deputys [sic] sent from Ohio, to strengthen, ratify and confirm the annexed treaty subscribed by Killbuck...July 12, 1765.

Treaty discusses the Indians being accepted by the English in return for good behavior and the return to the English of "prisoners, deserters and negros." The Delaware also agree to open the roads through their territory to the English.

The supplement is a response from other tribes to the treaty with their signatures, including the Shawnee and Mingo Indians. The treaties are signed by William Johnson and others, including the chiefs of the Delaware Nation. There are also wax seals of the signers.

Included is a folder containing provenance information, letter from Mrs. Morris P. Ferris to Robert Means Thompson, and letter from George Heye to Miss Gaines, perhaps Ruth Gaines, discussing the treaties.

Also Photostats and typed transcripts of the treaties.

Uniform Title: Treaties, etc. Great Britain, 1765 May 8.

Notes:
Associated documentation folder in collection #9209.

Treaty and supplement were later published with its addendum in New York Colonial Documents, volume 7.

Forms part of the Native American Collection. (NAC).
Digitized for the Vanished Worlds, Enduring People exhibition.

Photostat copies.

Location: Kroch Library Rare & Manuscripts (Non-Circulating)
Call Number: Archives
9091

Additional material available in 9209.
extent2 folders.
formatsLegal Papers
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
record linkhttp://nac.library.cornell.edu/exhibition/encroachment/encroachment_3.html
record sourcehttps://catalog.library.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=5686738&DB=local
finding aidElectronic Access: Photographs available at:http://nac.library.cornell.edu/exhibition/encroachment/encroachment_3.html
acquisition informationHuntington Free Library. HFL purchased from Mr. Pell for $1000, 1933. Presumably Stephen H.G. Pell.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:13
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titleMuseum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. Photographic Archives.
repositoryNational Museum of the American Indian Archives Center
collection titlePhotographs obtained by George G. Heye or taken by anthropologists, explorers, amateurs, and others depicting numerous aspects of the lives of Native Americans of North, Central, and South America.

Major photographers include Ernest and Eloise Carter, Frank and Clara Churchill, Edward H. Davis, Mark Raymond Harrington, George Bird Grinnell, Frederick Johnson, Emry Kopta, Samuel K. Lothrop, George H. Pepper, Alanson B. Skinner, Frank Speck, Frederick Starr collection, A. Hyatt Verrill, and William Wildschut.

Some glass negatives and early photographic techniques are included in collection. Most photographs are identified.
extent82,000 photographs.
formatsPhotographs
accessBy appointment with Assistant Curator of Photography.
record linkhttp://nysl.nysed.gov/
record sourcehttp://americanindian.si.edu/
updated11/12/2014 11:30:13
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titleManuscripts on Native Americans, 1913-1946.
repositoryAmerican Philosophical Society
collection titleSeries I (4 folders) contains letters from the American Academy of Political and Social Science; Ruth Benedict; Archibald Crozier; George G. Heye; and Linton Satterthwaite.

Background Note
Frank Gouldsmith Speck was an anthropologist, linguist and ethnologist. He was educated at Columbia University (A.B., 1904; M.A., 1905), and at the University of Pennsylvania (Ph.D., 1908), where he remained for the rest of his professional career.

Alternate formats available
Available on microfilm (in a different arrangement from the processed collection) from

General note
This collection has been integrated as a subcollection within the Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss. Ms. Coll. #126)



extent4.75 linear ft.
formatsCorrespondence
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
record sourcehttp://www.amphilsoc.org/library
finding aidFinding aid (13 p.) available in the repository.
acquisition informationAmerican Philosophical Society Library, 105 South 5th St., Philadelphia, PA 19106-3386. Frank G. Speck Papers. Presented by Mrs. Frank G. Speck, 1950-1982, with additions by William N. Fenton, 1951, and John Witthoft, 1952. Gift of Mrs. Frank G. Speck; transferred from the Delaware County Institute of Science, 1971-1993.
updated08/25/2017 14:24:39
....................................................................


titleSamuel Alfred Barrett papers, 1893-1977.
repositoryUniversity of California, Berkeley
collection titleCollection consists of some personalia and correspondence, extensive field notes, writings, and records relating to the American Indian Film Project, dating primarily from the early and late years of Barrett's working life.

Biographical information contains course notes, diaries of trips to Africa, Hawaii, the American Southwest, national parks in the Western United States, and the Yucatan Peninsula.

Correspondence includes letters to and from Alfred Kroeber, George G. Heye, Frederick J. Dockstadter, and other anthropologists, Milwaukee Public Museum colleagues W.C. McKren, Robert E. Ritzenthaler, and Stephan F. De Borhegyi, and with various Barrett family members.

Writings are articles, monographs, speeches, and book reviews. Field notes date from 1896 and reflect Barrett's work with the Pomoan peoples, the Cayapa Indians of Ecuador, the Hopi, Kwakiutl, and Sierra Miwok Indians, as well as information about the Chippewa, Menominee, Piute, Washo, Wintun, and Yuki Indians.

Most papers relating to his tenure at the Milwaukee Public museum remained with that institution and not generally present in this collection.

Biography
Ethnologist, linguist, writer, and film maker, Barrett studied with Alfred L. Kroeber at the University of California, Berkeley, and received a doctorate in anthropology in 1908. He was curator of anthropology (1911-1920), and director (1920-1940) of the Milwaukee Public Museum.

Location Bancroft
Call No. BANC MSS 86/172 c
Library Has oversize folders 1-3

Location Bancroft
Call No. BANC FILM 2448, etc.
Note Microfilmed portions of collection

Location Bancroft (NRLF)
Call No. BANC MSS 86/172 c
Library Has CARTON 1-CARTON 25

extent31.25 linear ft.
formatsBusiness Papers Personal Papers Correspondence Notes Writings
accessCOLLECTION STORED OFF-SITE: Advance notice required for use.
record linkhttp://ark.cdlib.org/ark:/13030/hb8b69p24z/
record sourcehttp://oskicat.berkeley.edu:80/record=b10545060~S1
finding aidFinding aid available; digitized.
acquisition informationThe papers were transferred to The Bancroft Library from the Robert H. Lowie Museum in April, 1986.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:13
....................................................................


titleCulin Archival Collection Series 1: General Correspondence 1886-1929 1919-1929 (bulk).
repositoryThe Brooklyn Museum Libraries and Archives
collection titleSeries 1 includes correspondence with Culin's colleagues and peers: museum professionals, artists and designers, traders and collectors, exposition directors and exhibitors, students and would-be proteges, editors, authors, translators, merchants, and the general public familiar with his work.

Subseries 1.1 contains letters from German and American museum curators and professors recommending Culin's appointment at the University of Pennsylvania.

Subseries 1.2 focuses on Culin's work as an ethnologist, and includes letters directly related to collecting or the profession itself, with some mention of his personal or social life. Correspondence documents Culin's association with The Brooklyn Museum, as well as dealings with collectors and curators. Important correspondents include George Dorsey (Field Columbian Museum), Thomas Keam (collector and trader of Native American objects), Charles H. Read (British Museum), artist Thomas Eakins, Franklin W.Hooper (Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences), and John Wanamaker.

Subseries 1.3 consists of a letter press book containing Culin's outgoing correspondence during his first four years at The Brooklyn Museum, and relating primarily to museum business and the collection of Native American materials in the Southwest. Franklin W. Hooper, Director of the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, is the primary correspondent. Other important correspondents include Alfred G. Mayer (Curator-in-Chief, The Brooklyn Museum), George Dorsey (Field Columbian Museum), and Andrew Vanderwagen (a trader in Native American objects).

Subseries 1.4 is a large and diverse collection of materials detailing Culin's daily museum, professional, scholarly, and personal activities. This wide-ranging correspondence deals with the acquisition, interpretation, and display of artifacts, as well as documentation of museum administrative matters.

Purchases and gifts to The Brooklyn Museum, loans to other institutions and department stores, activities of the Museum Governing Committee, and major installations such as the Rainbow House (1925-26) and exhibitions such as "Primitive Negro Art" (1923) are documented in correspondence with directors, trustees and Culin's colleagues at the Museum, including Frank Babbott, Edward Blum, and Walter Crittenden (trustees), and William Henry Fox (Director).

Purchases and donations to The Brooklyn Museum are further documented in correspondence with professional dealers, collectors, and missionaries, including William O. Oldman, Edwart Barrett, Wise & Company, Yamanaka & Company, and Hassan Khan Monif (Persian Antique Gallery, New York).
Primary correspondents among museum professionals include: Louis Clarke (University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology); John deVegh (National Museum of Applied Art, Budapest); Berthold Laufer (Field Columbian Museum, Chicago); Charles Lummis (Southwest Museum), Albert A. von le Coq (German ethnologist and archaeologist), as well as directors and curators at the British Museum; Commercial Museum, Philadelphia; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation; Philadelphia Museum of Art; the Smithsonian Institution; and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.
Culin supplied study pieces for design institutes and manufacturers, and arranged for loans of exhibition material to department stores; particularly significant is the "Primitive Negro Art" exhibition (1923), where textile patterns created from museum objects were used in the creation of new lines of textiles and clothing. Correspondents include representatives of Aaron & Company; Abraham & Straus; Arditti & Sons; Blanck & Company; Bonwit Teller; Lord & Taylor; Macy & Company; A. Namm & Sons; Wanamaker Company; Edward L. Mayer & Company; and Pratt Institute.
Correspondence with Frederic B. Pratt (President) and William Longyear (Professor, School of Fine Arts), reflect the Museum's relationship with Pratt Institute, including having students study at and display their work at the Museum; Pratt's purchase of objects that Culin wanted to acquire for the Museum; and Culin's assistance in arranging exhibitions at Pratt, including "German Textiles" (1924).

In Culin's extensive correspondence with M. D. C. Crawford (editor, Women's Wear), many subjects are considered: the International Congess of Americanists; the International Silk Exposition; department stores; the "Primitive Negro Art" exhibition; development for a study room for designers; textiles; museum acquisitions; the Pratt Peasant Costume exhibition (1924); the Rainbow House; Culin's "Road to Beauty" manuscript; the Philadelphia Sesquicentennial (1926); the "History of the Blouse" exhibition at the United States Waist League (1922); object loans; and Crawford's books, "The Heritage of Cotton" (1924), and "The History of Silk" (1925). Culin's collaboration with Crawford provided the foundation for the Museum's Industrial Division (1935-46), and Design Laboratory (founded 1947).

Culin's professional relationships with designers are revealed in correspondence with artist Ruth Reeves, accompanied by clippings of her lectures and fashion designs, which were reproduced in Women's Wear illustrations. Culin also corresponded with Elizabeth Alexander (Arden Gallery), Lee Simonson (Theatre Guild), the Neighborhood Playhouse about loans for performances and exhibitions, and with the Art Alliance on the subject of art competitions.

Correspondence with John deVegh, Director of the National Museum of Applied Arts in Budapest, offers a portrait of Hungary recovering from World War I. Correspondence with Charles Winter of the Hungarian Consulate, Walter T. Swingle (United States Department of Agriculture, and editor of the Hungarian newspaper Szabadsay), and Anna Igumnova provide additional views of life in eastern Europe at that time.

A large collection of clippings includes many "Design Department" and "Romance of Merchandise" columns from Women's Wear, some with Culin's byline; clippings documenting the effect of Brooklyn Museum exhibitions and programs on the general population, the textile manufacturers, and museum community in general; reviews and synopses of Culin's lectures and exhibitions; articles on topics such as Asia, games, clothing and textiles; and obituaries.

Culin's lectures at various institutions are documented in clippings and correspondence. Lectures at The Brooklyn Museum on topics such as divination and fortune telling, dolls, and games are similarly chronicled.
Also included are photographs related to or attached to correspondence, and an extensive collection of ephemeral material, including announcements, flyers, catalogs, invitations, notices, holiday cards, business and calling cards, loan forms, invoices, booklets, sketches, press releases, notes, receipts, and labels.

Biographical/Historical Note:
Stewart Culin (1858-1929), ethnologist and museum curator, worked at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology from 1890 to 1903, and served as Curator of Ethnology at The Brooklyn Museum from 1903 until his death.

Letters to or from Babbot can be found in Subseries 1.4: correspondence (incoming and outgoing), Dates 1918-1929, Extent 28 DB, 90 photos (11.75 l.f.)

Found In
Culin, Stewart Culin Archival Collection

Location:
Brooklyn Archives

Call Number:
S01 1
extent13.75 l.f.
formatsCorrespondence Exhibition Files Business Records Financial Records Ephemera
accessPermission of Archivist/Librarian required.
record linkhttp://www.brooklynmuseum.org/research/digital-collections/culin/culin.php
record sourcehttp://arcade.nyarc.org/record=b768753~S1
acquisition informationA year after Culin's death in 1929, the Brooklyn Museum purchased his library and archival collection from his widow, an acquisition that included both institutional records and personal papers. The library materials were accessioned into the Museum Library and the archival materials were placed in storage. The bulk of the Culin Archival Collection remained there until the 1970s, although some of the expedition reports and parts of the correspondence files were removed by the Museum Library and several curatorial departments over the years. In 1980, Chief Librarian Margaret B. Zorach surveyed curatorial departments and created a list of materials separated from the collection.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:13
....................................................................


titleEdward H. Davis papers, 1910-1929.
repositoryCornell University Libraries
collection titleField notebooks, sketchbooks, manuscripts, and correspondence, pertaining primarily to Indians of California and into Mexico.

Includes index. Includes information about reservations, artifacts, ruins, ceremonies, descriptions of wildlife, landscapes, languages, and archeological notes.

Tribes mentioned include, Pima, Seri, Mayo, Yaqui, Nayarit (Cora), Yuma, Opata, Modoc, Paiute, Diegueño, Cahuilla, and Soboba Indians.

Biographical Note
Edward Davis was a collector who lived near Mesa Grande outside of San Diego. He collected ethnographic objects from southern California for George G. Heye's Museum of the American Indian in New York.

Notes:
Forms part of the Native American Collection. (NAC)

Photocopies and microfilm available.

Location:
Kroch Library Rare & Manuscripts (Non-Circulating)
Call Number: Archives
9166

Location: Olin Library
Call Number: Film 8650
Volumes : reels 1-2
Reproduction Note:
Microfilm. Bethlehem, Pa. : Preservation Resources, for the Huntington Free Library, 1999. 2 reels ; 35 mm.

Location: Olin Library
Call Number: Film 8650
Copy Number: 2
Reproduction Note:
Microfilm. Bethlehem, Pa. : Preservation Resources, for the Huntington Free Library, 1999. 2 reels ; 35 mm.
extent39 folders, 33 volumes.
formatsCorrespondence Diaries Manuscript
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
record linkhttp://rmc.library.cornell.edu/ead/htmldocs/RMM09166.html
record sourcehttps://catalog.library.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=5734010&DB=local
finding aidOnline and in repository
acquisition informationHuntington Free Library.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:13
....................................................................


titleStockbridge Indian papers, 1739-1915.
repositoryCornell University Libraries
collection titleCollection includes correspondence, government publications, bills and acts related to the Stockbridge Indians.

Includes copies of treaties; petitions to New York State and the federal governments; tribal rolls; lists of payments to Stockbridge and Munsee individuals; powers of attorney from Stockbridge leaders to particular individuals; government documents; and annuity claims. The documents range from correspondence about relocating to sites in Indiana and Wisconsin to receipts for small expenditures.

Legislative documents reflect political actions involving the Stockbridge, Munsee, Brothertown, and Oneida nations in the U.S. Congress, the New York State Legislature, and the U.S. Court of Claims. Information regarding the collection acquisition by the Museum of the American Indian, Heye foundation.

Correspondence to and from donors of pieces found in the collection.

Reference questions and additional information submitted from patrons of the Huntington Free Library. Photostats of related documents from the Massachusetts State Archives. Draft calendars and guides, microfilming project information.

Notes:
Correspondence to Jedediah Morse has been removed and is now in collection 9086. The papers removed include Stockbridge numbers 1.1, 1.3-1.5, 3.1, 4.1, 4.2, 6.1-6.3, and 7.1-7.5.

The Report on the Oneida, Stockbridge and Brotherton Indians by Jeremy Belknap and Jedediah Morse, Stockbridge paper 1.2 removed and is collection 9054.

Papers 204, 248, 276, 299, 567, and 765 noted missing 12-6-05.

Box 1 papers 0-429, Box 2 430-964, Box 3 965-1094, government publications start at 977, Box 4 Massachusetts State Archive papers, collection history, misc, Box 5 guides and name index.

Collection includes printed chronological guides that describe each piece.

Forms part of the Native American Collection. (NAC)

Location: Kroch Library Rare & Manuscripts (Non-Circulating)
Call Number: Archives
9185

Location: Olin Library
Call Number: Film 8661
Volumes : reels 1-7

Reproduction Note:
Microfilm. Andover, Mass. : Northeast Document Conservation Center, 1987. 7 reels ; 35 mm.

extent4.5 cubic ft.
formatsCorrespondence Legal Papers Printed Materials
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
record linkhttp://rmc.library.cornell.edu/ead/htmldocs/RMM09185.html
record sourcehttps://catalog.library.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=5734489&DB=local
finding aidMicrofilm and printed guide available. Also a card file indexing personal names found in the papers.
acquisition informationHuntington Free Library. Portions of the collection a gift to HFL from Mabel Choate.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:13
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titleCatalogue of valuable printed books, illuminated and other manuscripts, autograph letters, topographical drawings of American Interest, 1936.
repositoryCornell University Libraries
collection titleAuction catalog and consignment reserve sheet for George G. Heye for lots 373 to 390 in the catalog.

Catalog lists 17 items and descriptions of items from Mr. Heye that he had sold at this auction. They pertain to Native American and early American history and exploration.

Notes:
Forms part of the Native American Collection. (NAC)

Location: Kroch Library Rare & Manuscripts (Non-Circulating)
Call Number: Archives
9021


Cite As:
Catalogue of valuable printed books, illuminated and other manuscripts, autograph letters, topographical drawings of American Interest, #9021. Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library.

extent2 items.
formatsAuction Catalogs
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
record sourcehttps://catalog.library.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=5622812&DB=local
acquisition informationHuntington Free Library.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:13
....................................................................


titleCatalogs and advertisements for Indian traders [ca.1900].
repositoryCornell University Libraries
collection titleCollection of catalogs, auction listings, and brochures for Indian curios.

Some of the catalogs list prices for items including jewelry, blankets, clothing, baskets, and pottery. Some of the shops appear to have specialized in excavated items, while others contracted with tribes and reservations to have items made for their shops.

Auction catalogs list items from estates of Indian collectors. Collection has a focus on Navajo textiles, but includes information on other items from Alaska to New York.

Brochures include: Hotel Astor Indian Hall; Exhibition and Sale of the Riggs collection of Navajo Indian Rugs and curios, John Wanamaker; Rough Rider robes of the Wild West; Gross Kelly & Co. genuine reservation Indian handmade rugs, jewelry, novelties; Popular presents,

Benham Indian Trading Company; Alaska Indian basketry, Alaska Steamship Company; Candelario, the Curio Man, genuine Indian and Mexican Curios; Et-Sity-Tsosie, Little Silver Smith of the Noschiti trading post; Inklings apropos Pre-Columbian relics and the ruins wherein found, Reamer Ling Collector;

Catalogue of a unique collection of Cliff Dweller relics taken from the lately discovered ruins of southwestern Colorado and adjacent parts of Utah, New Mexico, and Arizona, Art Institute Building, Chicago, C. H. Green proprietor; The Navajo, weaving and blankets, Crystal Navajo Reservation, C. G. Newcomb and J. B. Moore Indian traders, 2 copies;

Good Things from the West, Navajo blankets from the collection of Herbert A. Coffeen; Charles Ilfeld Company, genuine Southwest Indian artcraft, Mexican imports, and novelties, with price list and weaving sample; A Modern Navajo blanket, four plates from Indian Print Shop Indian School Journal The Navajo, fine Navajo blankets, rugs, ceremonial baskets, silverware, jewelry, curios, etc., C. G. Newcomb, J. B. Moore;

The use of Navajo blankets as a home decoration, C. N. Cotton Co.; Catalogue and price list Navajo blankets and Indian curios, J. L. Hubbell Indian trader, 2 copies; Ye Olde Curiosity Shop, Alaska Eskimo and Indian relics, J. E. "Daddy" Standley, includes post card with quote from George Heye;

Indian Baskets of the Hupa and Klamath Tribes, A. Brizard; Collection of curios from the ancient mounds and ruins in the Salt River Valley, Arizona, C. J. Dyer; Catalogue of the celebrated Indian collection of the late Mr. John H. McIlvain of Philadelphia comprising an extraordinary large number of specimens of the handicraft of the American Indians, Thomas Birch’s Sons; Maisel’s Indian Trading post catalog, jewelry, metalwork, gold, silver, rugs and Navajo blankets.

Location: Kroch Library Rare & Manuscripts (Non-Circulating)
Call Number: Archives
9190
extent28 items.
formatsAuction Catalogs Catalogs
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
record sourcehttps://catalog.library.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=5734634&DB=local
acquisition informationHuntington Free Library.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:13
....................................................................


titleUniversity of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. Correspondence with Henry Charles Lea, 1892-1909.
repositoryUniversity of Pennsylvania
collection titleComprises items from Charles C. Abbott (1892-1893) regarding his fieldwork with H. C. Mercer collecting artifacts of the Delaware Indians.

Also includes items from H. V. Hilprecht (1894-1906) and treasurer John Sparhawk (1898-1902) regarding excavations of cuneiform tablets in Nippur and Lea's contributions to the Babylonian Exploration Fund.

One item from G. B Gordon (1809) requests funding for an exhibition of North American Indian artifacts loaned by George G. Heye.

Found In:
Henry Charles Lea Papers, ca. 1830-1935. Folder 1260.

Location: Rare Book & Ms Library Manuscripts
Call Number: Ms. Coll. 111
extent21 items (24 leaves).
formatsCorrespondence
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
record sourcehttp://www.franklin.library.upenn.edu/
updated11/12/2014 11:30:13
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titleMinutes of conferences held at Fort Pitt, 1760.
repositoryCornell University Libraries
collection titleUnbound notes from a conference held in April 1760 by George Croghan, Esquire, deputy agent to the Honourable Sir William Johnson, Baronet, His Majesty’s agent and superintendent for Indian affairs in the northern districts of North America; with the chiefs and warriors of the Six Nations, Delaware, Shawnee, Miami, and Mohegan Indians.

Include information about who was in attendance, things that were exchanged, and what transpired.

Biographical/Historical Note:
According to Mr. Julian F. Boyd, Librarian of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, who viewed this document on October 1, 1938, with Mr. Carl Van Doren, this is am accurate, clerk’s copy of the original minutes of the conference, corrected in the handwriting of Mr. Richard Peters, Secretary of the conference.

Notes:
Published in Colonial Records of Pennsylvania, volume 7.

Associated documentation folder contains, invoice from the Museum of the American Indian signed by George Heye, and other provenance information, in collection #9209.

Forms part of the Native American Collection. (NAC)

Photocopies and microfilm available.

Cite As:
Minutes of conferences held at Fort Pitt, #9147. Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library.
extent16 leaves.
formatsNotes
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
record sourcehttps://catalog.library.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=5733928&DB=local
acquisition informationHuntington Free Library. HFL purchased with the Easton conference minutes manuscript, #9148, for $100, 1933. Originals with Bd. Mss, photocopies in Box 13. Additional material available in 9209.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:13
....................................................................


titleFranz Boas Papers, 1862-1942.
repositoryAmerican Philosophical Society
collection titleThe Boas Collections at the APS are the key resource for documenting the transformations in American ethnography, linguistics, and physical anthropology in the period between the 1880s and 1940s.

The Boas Papers (Mss B B61) consist of the main body of Franz Boas's professional correspondence, including particularly extensive and important correspondence with Edward Sapir, Gladys Reichard, Elsie Parsons, Leo Frachtenburg, John Alden Mason, M. J. McGee, Frederick W. Hodge, Alfred Kroeber, George Hunt, and Alfred M. Tozzer, and material relating to Boas's involvement in professional and other organizations.

This collection provides richly detailed coverage of every facet of Boas's career from the time of his emigration to America in the mid-1880s until his death in 1940, shedding light on the development of ethnography, anthropological linguistics, and anthropological approaches to archaeology.

His correspondence was highly diverse, including not only his fellow anthropologists, but geneticists, evolutionary biologists, social scientists, and social activists.

The Boas collections are also a rich resource for historians interested in "radical" social causes in the twentieth-century through Boas's participation in socialist political circles and progressive social movements.

There is significant material on the Germanistic Society of America and for German National Socialism and the expulsion of European scholars, as well as the efforts to reestablish them in British and American institutions.

Hitorical Note
During the half century leading up to the Second World War, Franz Boas helped to define academic anthropology in the United States. Trained as a geographer at the University of Heidelberg, Boas worked initially on the Inuit of Baffin Island and subsequently on the cultures of the Indians of the Northwest Pacific Coast, becoming a leading figure in American anthropology by the first decade of the twentieth century.

As Professor of Anthropology at Columbia University, Boas made significant theoretical contributions to ethnology, linguistics, and physical anthropology, helping to ingrain the four fields approach in his discipline and introducing the concept of cultural relativism into wide currency. He was, as well, a committed Socialist and an ardent opponent of both racism and fascism.

Call #: Mss.B.B61

Historical Note
Franz Boas was an American anthropologist, studied the Eskimos and Northwest Coast Indians, and held positions at Columbia University and the American Museum of Natural History.
extent59 linear ft
formatsBusiness Papers Personal Papers Correspondence
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
bibliographyA published two-volume guide to the microfilm collection of Boas' professional papers (Scholarly Resources, Wilmington, Delaware) is available in the repository.
record sourcehttp://www.amphilsoc.org/library
acquisition informationPresented by Helene Boas Yampolsky, 1961-1962; and Dr. Cecil Yampolsky, 1964.
updated08/25/2017 14:24:39
....................................................................


titleMuseum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. Library. Miscellaneous manuscripts about North American Indians, 1695-[ca.1929]
repositoryNational Museum of the American Indian Archives Center
collection titleManuscripts and other materials relating to North American Indians include papers on Spanish relations with Indians of New Orleans and Florida, 1765-1802; a 1695 document in French concerning the encroachment of the French towards New Mexico;

minutes of conferences held with Indians at Easton, Pa., 1765 and at Fort Pitt, Pa., 1760; journal of events among the Indians of the Six Nations of the Iroquois, written by Col. Daniel Claus, 1762-1766; treaty made by Sir William Johnson with the Delaware and other nations of Indians, 1765; six documents pertaining to Mohegan Indians, 1716-1791;

letters from travellers providing observations about Seneca Indians, late 1700's-mid 1800's; letter written by Joseph Brant of the Mohawk Indians, 1803; letters sent to President Andrew Jackson from George Graham of the War Department about Chickasaw Indians of the Southeast, 1816-1817; 1817 copy of treaty between Governor of New York and Onondaga, Seneca, and Cayuga Indians, 1788; appeal made by Chippewa of Canada to the Queen of England for a training school, 1844;

correspondence from army and government officers about Indians of the West, late 1800's; copy of a pictograph on a painted buckskin recording Oglala Sioux tribal history for 80 years, 1894; correspondence and notes concerning visit of Zuñi Indians to George Heye in New York, 1920-1929;

field notebook of Foster Saville's excavation of a site in Rhode Island, n.d.; and notes written by George Emmons about Tlingit Indians of eastern Alaska, n.d.

Language Note
French and English.

extent3.3 cubic ft.
formatsManuscript Correspondence Notebooks Ephemera Legal Papers
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
record sourcehttp://www.loc.gov/coll/nucmc/
updated11/12/2014 11:30:13
....................................................................


titleFrank G. Speck Penobscot Indian Photographs
repositoryRaymond H. Fogler Library Special Collections Dept.
collection titleThe collection contains copies of photographs of Penobscot Indian life taken in the field by Frank G. Speck around 1911, as well as copies of some photographs collected by him.

The original photographs belong to the University of Pennsylvania Museum in Philadelphia. Many pieces depicted now belong to the National Museum of the American Indian, George Gustav Heye Center.

George Heye sponsored some of Speck's work. The photographs depict individual Penobscot Indians as well as objects such as baskets, snowshoes, tools, clothing, etc.

Notes
Copies of photographs in the collection of the University of Pennsylvania Museum, Philadelphia.

extent4 folders.
formatsPhotographs
accessNo restrictions on access.
record linkhttp://www.library.umaine.edu/speccoll/FindingAids/SpeckFrank.htm
record sourcehttp://ursus.maine.edu
finding aidFinding aid in the repository.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:13
....................................................................


titleJesse Logan Nusbaum Papers ca. 1900-1980
repositoryNational Anthropological Archives
collection titleBio / His Notes:
Jesse Logan Nusbaum was a Southwest archeologist, research and museum administrator, and National Park Service administrator. He was an employee of the School of American Research, long-time superintendent and archeologist at Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado, and first director of the Laboratory of Anthropology in Santa Fe.

For brief periods of time, he was affiliated with the Bureau of American Ethnology, United States National Museum, and Museum of American Indians, and he worked in the field as assistant to Edgar Lee Hewett, Alfred Vincent Kidder, Sylvanus Griswold Morley (in Central America), and Frederick Webb Hodge.

Included in his projects were work on the Pajrito Plateau, excavation and repairs at Balcony House on Mesa Verde, restoration of the Palace of Governors in Santa Fe, installation of exhibits at the Panama-California Exposition, excavation at Basketmaker Cave in Kane County, Utah, and investigations on El Paso Natural Gas Company Projects in the Southwest.

Cite as:
Papers of Jesse Logan Nusbaum,National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
extentSee repository for details
formats
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
record sourcehttp://www.siris.si.edu/
acquisition informationThe collection was donated by Rosemary Nusbaum, June 1987.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:13
....................................................................


titleBureau of American Ethnology General Correspondence 1909-1949
repositoryNational Anthropological Archives
collection titleIncludes letters, memoranda, telegrams, reports received copies of similar materials sent out by the BAE. There are also an appreciable number of photographs, maps, manuscripts, drawings, newspaper clippings, other printed material, lists of collections, and announcements attached to the letters.


Most of the outgoing letters were signed by administrative officers of the BAE, but there are also many memoranda prepared by the research staff to assist the officers in answering inquiries.

Some of the outgoing letters have been signed by higher Smithsonian officials. In many cases, this is explained by the fact that the file was kept among the central files of the Institution and there was some mixing of materials that might have been more appropriately filed elsewhere.

Many of the incoming letters are reports of field work from BAE employees and collaborators. Somewhat similar materials were received from non-Smithsonian researchers in universities, museums, state historical and archeological societies, and other organizations.

There is also similar material from well-informed amateurs interested in ethnology or archeology, and, to a much less degree, from photographers of Indian subjects. In addition, there are letters from those more casually interested in anthropology who offered information about the locations of archeological sites (especially mounds and pictographs), the existence of collections of artifacts, and observations about American Indians.

Some of the material is of an administrative nature and relates to such matters as personnel actions, instructions, plans of operation, finances, routine reports, office space, supplies, equipment, services, arrangements for expeditions, arrangements with other agencies for cooperative activities, and the transfer of specimens to the United States National Museum.

Also included is material concerning the acquisition of photographs and manuscripts for the BAE collections. In addition, there is a considerable number of relatively routine reference inquiries from the general public, publishers, motion picture companies, author of popular works and textbooks, lawyers, and librarians.

Organization:
Most of the material is filed alphabetically by name of correspondent, institution, or project. The filing is not consistent and material received from one individual may be filed under all three types of possibilities.

Moreover, some letters have been filed by their subject rather than by writer. There is a separate subseries at the end of the file that includes some of the correspondence with federal agencies. Series

Cite as: General correspondence, 1909-1949, Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution

extent40.5 linear feet
formatsCorrespondence Map Photographs Clippings Drawings
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
record sourcehttp://www.siris.si.edu/
updated11/12/2014 11:30:13
....................................................................


titleAles Hrdlicka Papers ca. 1887-1943
repositoryNational Anthropological Archives
collection titleThis record was created in order to complete the indexing of AAK7990 (q.v.). Indexing is continued on record AAK7996.

Cite as:
Ales Hrdlicka Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution

extent133 linear feet
formatsCorrespondence
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
record sourcehttp://www.siris.si.edu/
updated11/12/2014 11:30:13
....................................................................


titleMark Raymond Harrington Photograph Collection, 1899-1947.
repositoryNational Museum of the American Indian Archives Center
collection titleIncludes photographs of individual tribal members, artifacts; and the following archeological sites: Hawikku (Hawikuh), Zuni Pueblo, New Mexico; Mill Creek, Tehama County, California; Coachilla Valley, California; Sandal Cave, New Mexico;

Eagle Canyon, Texas; Thea Heye Cave, Pyramid Lake, Nevada; Crown Peak, Chisos Mountains, Texas; Pueblo Grande, Nevada; Salt Caves, St. Thomas, Nevada; Chuckawalla Cave, Nevada; Lovelock Cave, Pershing County, Nevada; other sites in Nevada; cacti in Brewster County, Texas and California;

archaeological sites in Arkansas, Florida, Missouri, New York, and Tennessee Collection also includes a variety of scenic shots in different states; shots of persons, identified and unidentified; personal photographs of Harrington, his son, and one of his wives (ELH); and photographs taken during his expeditions to Cuba and Ecuador.

Includes photographs of the Alibamu, Apache, Catawba, Cherokee, Chitimacha, Choctaw, Chumash, Comanche, Delaware, Iowa, Iroquois, Kaw, Kickapoo, Kiowa, Klamath, Koasati, Maidu, Mattaponi, Mohegan, Nanticoke, Narragansett, Navajo, Niantic (Nyantic),Ojibwa (Chippewa), Osage, Paiute,

Pamunkey, Peoria, Pit River, Potawatomi, Quapaw, Sac and Fox (Sauk and Fox), Seminole, Shawnee, Tolowa, Tulare, Wampanoag, Wichita, Wyandot, Yara, and Zuni tribes.

Bio / His Notes:
Mark Raymond Harrington was born on the campus of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor on July 6, 1882. He received his BS in 1907 and his MA in 1908 from Columbia University, where he studied under Franz Boas.

He met George Heye while working at Covert’s Indian store in New York in 1908 and Heye hired him shortly thereafter. Harrington spent from 1908-1911 visiting and collecting from tribes in the east and Midwest for Heye. From 1911-1915 Harrington was assistant curator at the University of Pennsylvania Museum. From 1916-1917 he conducted archeological surveys in Cuba and Arkansas, after which he spent a short time in the U.S. Army during the First World War.

After his return in 1919 he started a series of archeological surveys in Tennessee, Arkansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, Nevada, and Texas. Harrington worked for George G. Heye as an archaeologist, ethnologist, field collector, and curator, primarily along the eastern seaboard, in the south, Midwest, west, Cuba and Ecuador, from 1908 to 1928. He then joined the staff of the Southwest Museum as curator until his retirement in 1964.

He died in San Fernando, California on June 30, 1971. Harrington is the author of many books and several hundred articles. A partial bibliography can be found in the Mark Raymond Harrington manuscript collection in the archives of the National Museum of the American Indian, Cultural Resource Center, Suitland, Maryland.

extent329 negatives, 19 prints, and 3 lantern slides have been digitized as of July 2003.
formatsPhotographs
accessAccess restricted. For information on this collection consult the NMAI photo archivist at 301-238-1400 or NMAIphotos@si.edu.
record sourcehttp://www.siris.si.edu/
acquisition informationPhotographs taken between the years 1899 and 1947. Many, taken by Harrington on his field expeditions, probably came into the museum during the time of his employ with Heye. However, some may have also come in with a collection of papers (some donated and some sold) to the museum by his widow, Marie Walsh Harrington, between the years 1971 and 1985.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:13
....................................................................


titleMuseum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records, 1890-1998.
repositoryNational Museum of the American Indian Archives Center
collection titleThe records document the governance and programmatic activities of the Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation (MAI) from its inception in 1904 until becoming part of the Smithsonian Institution in 1989.

Bio / His Notes:
The Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation was established by wealthy collector George Gustav Heye in 1908. Heye began collecting American Indian artifacts as early as 1897. Based first our of his apartment in New York, Heye bought collections and documentary photographs, sponsored expeditions, and traveled and collected items himself.

In addition, he sponsored numerous expeditions across the Western Hemisphere, including North American, Canada, South America and Central America. As he accumulated numerous objects it became apparent that he would need a separate space from his apartment to contain his burgeoning collection.

From 1908 to 1917 Heye housed his artifacts on temporary loan at the University of Pennsylvania’s University Museum, Pennsylvania, in lofts on East 33rd Street in New York City, and at other depositories. However, once the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation was completed in 1916, the collections moved to their permanent museum location at Audubon Terrace, at 155th Street and Broadway in New York City.

The museum, containing ethnographic and archaeological collections from North, Central and South America, then opened to the public in 1922. Less than ten years later, Heye completed a storage facility and research branch in the Pelham Bay area of the Bronx.

Heye served as Chairman of the Board and Museum Director until his death in 1957. After growing concern about the financial and other management of the collections came to a head, the museum became part of the Smithsonian Institution in 1989 and in 1994 opened exhibit and public program space in the U.S. Customs House at Bowling Green near New York City’s Battery Park.

The Cultural Resources Center in Suitland, Maryland later opened in 1999 and the main Washington, DC museum opened in 2004.
extent500 linear feet.
formatsAdministrative Records
accessCollection is currently being processed; some boxes may be unavailable for research. Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment. Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from the National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
record sourcehttp://www.siris.si.edu/
acquisition informationRecords were transferred from the GGHC in New York City to the NMAI Archive Center's collection in 1999.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:13
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titleHendricks-Hodge Hawikku Expedition Photograph Collection 1917-1923
repositoryNational Museum of the American Indian Archives Center
collection titleTribe covered in the photographs is Zuni.

Bio / His Notes:
The Hawikku (Hawikuh) expedition to McKinley County in New Mexico was sponsored by Harmon W. Hendricks lasted six years - from 1917 to 1923, excepting the summer of 1922. Frederick W. Hodge first discovered the region in 1886 when he accompanied Frank Cushing on the Hemenway Expedition.

Hodge, Alanson B. Skinner, and Edwin F. Coffin were the first staff members to head up the expedition in the summer of 1917. The ruin of Hawikku is that of the principal one of the seven cities of Cibola which were discovered in 1539 by the Franciscan friar Marcos de Niza. In 1629 Hawikku became the seat of a Franciscan mission which continued there until 1670. Hawikku is important because it is known to have been occupied by Zuni Indians from prehistoric times until the historic period, and also shows the earliest period of contact. In 1918 Hodge, Coffin and Pepper; in 1919 and 1920 Hodge, Nusbaum, and Coffin; and in 1921 Hodge, Nusbaum, and Cadzow continued the expedition.

In 1923 only Hodge is named in the Annual Report as going out and wrapping up the expedition, but obviously there were others who went. The majority of photos were taken by the members of the Hawikku expedition, except 30 which were taken by Victor Schindler and eight which were taken by a Miss Orlady. Most have the photographer identified; however, there are a number which only list “Hendricks-Hodge Expedition” as photographer and some are unnamed.

Then there are some which list Hodge as the photographer in one place and someone else in another for the same photograph. So there is discrepancy in some instances as to who actually took the photograph. More about Hawikku can be found in the Annual Reports of the Museum of the American Indian (1917-1923); Indian Notes (Vol. 1, Nos. 1 & 3); History of Hawikuh, New Mexico: one of the so-called cities of Cíbola, by Frederick Webb Hodge (Los Angeles: The Southwest Museum, 1937);

and The Excavation of Hawikuh by Frederick Webb Hodge: Report of the Hendricks-Hodge Expedition 1917-1923, by Watson Smith, Richard B. Woodbury, and Nathalie F.S. Woodbury (New York: Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, 1966).

A smaller side expedition was made to Kechipauan in 1923. This was sponsored by Louis C.G. Clarke, Director of the University Museum at Cambridge, England. He contracted with George Heye to have a couple of Heye’s men excavate at Kechipauan, a site three-and-a-half miles from Hawikku. Samuel Lothrop was put in charge of the expedition with Charles Turbyfill his assistant; Lothrop and Coffin are listed on the negative envelopes as the photographers on this expedition.

There are 189 photographs related to Kechipauan. Frederick Hodge was the photographer of 12 photographs taken in 1917 and 1919, a few years before the actual expedition. (A short summary of Kechipauan can be found in Indian Notes, Vol. 1, No. 1 [1924], pp. 35-36.)


General Note:
Fifty-seven (57) of the images in the collection are identified as Zuni but unidentified as to provenance and may or may not be part of the Hawikku collection; 17 other Zuni images are also unidentified as to provenance but are more likely to belong to Hawikku.

Loc. of Assoc. Material:
The original fieldnotes from the expedition were in the Huntington Free Library until 2004 when they were obtained by Cornell University.

Information about the Hawikku paper collection can still be found on the Huntington Free Library website http://www.binc.org/hfl/html/page4.htm

extent1224 negatives, 295 b&w photographic prints
formatsPhotographs
accessAccess restricted. Researchers should contact the staff of the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection.
record sourcehttp://www.siris.si.edu/
updated11/12/2014 11:30:13
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