Archives Directory for the History of Collecting in America

Archives related to: Frick, Henry Clay, 1849-1919

titleHenry Clay Frick Art Collection Files, 1881-1920
repositoryThe Frick Collection and Frick Art Reference Library
collection titleThe Henry Clay Frick Art Collection Files document the selection, purchase, exhibition, and disposition of art works in Mr. Frick's collection from the years 1881 to 1919. The files also contain inventories of the collection made in 1920 after Mr. Frick's death. Correspondence, invoices, inventories, registers, handwritten notes, narrative descriptions, printed material, and photographs provide details of his art collection, with the bulk of the papers documenting purchases. The files contain handwritten notes by Mr. Frick, as well as his notations on some of the correspondence and invoices. The only file containing photographs is "List of Paintings Purchased and Returned, 1895-1907" in Series I: Purchases. These files do not represent a complete record of Mr. Frick's art collection (see Related Material note below).

Mr. Frick's association with the art dealers M. Knoedler & Co. and Duveen Brothers is documented in correspondence and telegrams found throughout the papers. Among the topics discussed are recommendations of works to consider for purchase, price negotiations, provenance, attribution, and conservation work, as well as administrative matters such as shipping and insurance. Charles Carstairs and Roland Knoedler of M. Knoedler & Co., and Joseph Duveen of Duveen Brothers were the primary correspondents from these two firms. Letters at times contain brief references of a personal nature regarding Mr. Frick's health, travels, and family. Also of note is the correspondence between Mr. Frick and Roger Fry, 1907-1913, who acted as an advisor and an intermediary in the purchase of paintings.

Additional correspondents in the papers include other art dealers, private owners, artists, art scholars, and advisors, including Carel F. L. de Wild, A. De Beruete, Arthur Tooth, Edward Brandus, Abraham Bredius, and Virginia P. Bacon. The Bill Books in Series I: Purchases also contain letters from some of the artists whose works Mr. Frick purchased, including Jules Breton, Jean Charles Cazin, Francis Davis Millet, William A. Coffin, Joseph Lindon Smith, Edmund Tarbell, Fritz Thaulow and Pascal-Adolphe-Jean Dagnan-Bouveret. Files concerning exhibitions in Series III contain correspondence from Gardiner Martin Lane of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and Charlotte A. Warren (Mrs. Whitney Warren).

Of note are two registers that document Mr. Frick's collection in Series I: Purchases: Paintings and Other Works of Art Owned by Henry C. Frick, known as the Red Book (1881-1918), and List of Paintings owned by H.C. Frick, known as the Black Book (1881-1904), each with handwritten entries that record purchase data, provenance information, and disposition of the art works.

Also of interest are lists of works placed on approval at One East 70th Street found in Series I: Purchases, Series II: Art Not Purchased, and Series V: Miscellaneous. Works are usually listed by their room location in the Frick residence. In some cases, the lists indicate which works were selected for purchase, and which were to be returned to the dealer.

Two privately printed catalogues of Mr. Frick's collection, from 1908 and 1915, contain descriptive entries of his paintings. The 1915 catalogue includes illustrations and room and wall locations.

Three files include details on the interior decoration of two rooms in the Frick residence: the Fragonard Room and Mrs. Frick's boudoir, in which panels by Boucher were installed. These files also contain several letters from White, Allom & Co., Carrère & Hastings and Cauldwell-Wingate Co.

A majority of the purchase files were found stored in their original containers: red 9 1/2" x 4" expanding wallet envelopes with a printed customized form glued to the front, entitled "H.C. Frick: Paintings, Etc." The form contains handwritten notes that record date of purchase, title, artist, correspondents, other paintings or artists mentioned in the file, the location of the invoice in the Bill Books, the Red Book page number and index number, voucher number, and general remarks. Folder notes list these items as "red envelopes."

The titles of works were listed as written on the red envelope or in other sources in the papers. The second title, following in brackets, is the title currently in use, if it could be determined. Any additional information that was provided by current sources, such as reattributions, is also listed in brackets. Purchase dates were determined from information found in the Red Book, the Black Book and other sources that recorded purchase data within the papers, although some variations exist within the documentation. Artists' names within the finding aid are derived from the Library of Congress Authorities, if listed, and the Frick Art Reference Library's on-line catalogue, FRESCO. In cases where multiple works appear on an invoice or other document, they are listed in the folder notes in the order in which they appear on the original.

Historical Note:
Henry Clay Frick was born December 19, 1849, in West Overton, Pa. One of six children, his parents were John W. Frick, a farmer, and Elizabeth Overholt Frick, the daughter of a whiskey distiller and flour merchant. Frick ended his formal education in 1866 at the age of seventeen, and began work as a clerk at an uncle's store in Mt. Pleasant, Pa. In 1871, Frick borrowed money to purchase a share in a coking concern that would eventually become the H.C. Frick Coke Co. Over the next decade, Frick expanded his business through the acquisition of more coal lands and coke ovens, and joined forces with fellow industrialist Andrew Carnegie in 1882. He assumed the chairmanship of Carnegie Bros. & Co. (later Carnegie Steel Co.) in 1889. He served in that capacity until his resignation from the company in December 1899. During his tenure as chairman, differences between Frick and Carnegie emerged, most significantly in their approach to labor issues. This culminated in the 1892 Homestead Strike, widely considered one of the most violent incidents in American labor history. This strained relations between the two men for the remainder of their working relationship, and in 1899, after Carnegie attempted to buy out Frick’s share in the company for a fraction of its real worth, Frick sued. Frick eventually received a satisfactory price for his shares, but agreed never again to hold a position in Carnegie Steel Co.

In December 1881, Frick married Adelaide Howard Childs of Pittsburgh. The couple purchased a house (called "Clayton") in the Homewood section of Pittsburgh, and had four children: Childs Frick (1883-1965), Martha Howard Frick (1885-1891), Helen Clay Frick (1888-1984), and Henry Clay Frick, Jr. (born 1892, died in infancy). After his break with Carnegie in 1899, Frick began spending more and more time on the East Coast of the United States. In 1905, he signed a ten-year lease on the Vanderbilt mansion at 640 Fifth Avenue in New York, and built an elaborate summer residence (“Eagle Rock”) on Boston’s North Shore, which was completed in 1906. Though Frick maintained his status as a Pittsburgh resident for the remainder of his life, he and his family chiefly divided their time between Massachusetts and New York. In 1907, Frick purchased land at the corner of Fifth Avenue and 70th Street, and in 1912, after the wrecking of the Lenox Library formerly on the site, began building the beaux arts mansion which now houses The Frick Collection. Designed by Thomas Hastings of the firm Carrère and Hastings, the family moved into the house at One East Seventieth Street in the fall of 1914, and Henry Clay Frick died there on December 2, 1919.

While there is evidence that Frick had an interest in art collecting as early as 1871 , little is known about his early acquisitions. His first recorded purchase came in 1881, when he acquired George Hetzel’s Landscape with River. Frick purchased only a few paintings over the next decade, but by the mid-1890’s, he was steadily acquiring new pictures at the rate of about one per month. His taste during this period ran toward contemporary French artists, such as Bouguereau and Cazin, and Barbizon School landscapes. After the turn of the century, however, Mr. Frick's taste shifted to eighteenth century English portraits and seventeenth century Dutch paintings, including works by Gainsborough, Lawrence, Vermeer, Cuyp, and Hobbema. He purchased his first Italian Renaissance painting, Pietro Aretino by Titian, and the first of his eight Van Dycks in 1905, the same year he and his family took up residence in the Vanderbilt house. Major acquisitions during this period include Rembrandt’s Self-Portrait, El Greco’s Purification of the Temple, a second painting by Vermeer (Officer and Laughing Girl), and Holbein’s Sir Thomas More. In 1914, the same year in which the Frick family moved into their newly constructed house at One East 70th Street, Mr. Frick's purchases included works by Gainsborough, Goya, Renoir, Turner and Whistler, among others. From 1915 until his death in 1919, Mr. Frick purchased fewer paintings overall, but added works by Bellini, Boucher, Bronzino, Hoppner, and Stuart, as well as additional works Titian, Holbein, and Vermeer.

Although Frick purchased from many dealers while building his collection, he heavily favored the firm of M. Knoedler & Co. Roland Knoedler, Charles Knoedler, and Charles Carstairs were considered friends as well as advisers on art, and Frick made more purchases through them than he did from any other source. A major exception, however, is Frick’s association with Duveen Brothers. Although Frick’s ties to this firm date back to 1906, when rugs, porcelains, and other objects were purchased for the Frick family’s Massachusetts estate, it was not until after the death of J.P. Morgan in 1913 that Frick made his most important acquisitions from them. From 1915 through 1918, Frick purchased millions of dollars of Renaissance bronzes, Chinese porcelains, Limoges enamels, and furniture from the Morgan estate through Joseph Duveen. In 1915, Frick also agreed to purchase the series of panels by Fragonard entitled The Progress of Love (also referred to as The Romance of Love and Youth). The installation of these panels in the Frick residence necessitated a complete renovation of the drawing room, which had only been completed a few months before. In addition to Knoedler and Duveen, Frick acquired paintings through domestic and European galleries such as Arthur Tooth & Sons, L. Crist Delmonico, The Ehrich Galleries, and Durand-Ruel & Sons. Frick also occasionally acquired works through individuals, including Virginia P. Bacon, Alice Creelman, and Roger Fry.

Henry Clay Frick’s acquisitions were carefully considered, and he often kept pictures on approval in his home for months before deciding whether to purchase or return them. In certain instances, though, works of art were bought sight unseen, or brought over from Europe at his expense but not purchased. As Frick’s collection grew and his taste evolved, he sometimes returned works for credit towards another painting, and pictures were also sometimes acquired with the option to return them for full credit within a given period of time. In some cases, he actively sought the opinions of art experts such as Roger Fry, Carel F. de Wild, and Charles Henry Hart before consenting to an acquisition.

Although Frick continued to acquire works of art until his death in 1919 (his last purchase was Vermeer’s Mistress and Maid), he quietly established plans to open his collection to the public after his death as early as 1915. In his will, dated June 24, 1915, Frick bequeathed his New York City residence, including furnishings, art, and decorative objects, as a museum “for the purpose of establishing and maintaining a gallery of art…and encouraging and developing the study of the fine arts, and of advancing the general knowledge of kindred subjects.” The museum was endowed with funds for maintenance, building alterations, and acquisitions of art. Henry Clay Frick’s widow continued to live at the residence until her death in 1931. At that time, the building was extensively renovated, and opened to the public as The Frick Collection in December 1935.

Related Material:
In the fall of 1953, Helen Clay Frick split Henry Clay Frick’s art collection files, sending the materials in this collection to The Frick Collection, while retaining eight linear feet of files related to Mr. Frick’s art works. These files became the property of the Helen Clay Frick Foundation upon the death of Miss Frick in 1984 and are now on deposit in The Frick Collection/Frick Art Reference Library Archives.

Location
The Frick Collection/Frick Art Reference Library Archives.
extent3.31 linear ft.
formatsCorrespondence Financial Records Notes Writings Printed Materials
accessThese records are open for research under the conditions of The Frick Collection/Frick Art Reference Library Archives access policy. Contact the Archives Department for further information at archives@frick.org
record linkhttp://www.frick.org/archives/FindingAids/HCFArtCollectionFiles.html
record sourcehttp://arcade.nyarc.org:80/record=b920824~S6
finding aidUnpublished finding aid available at the repository.
acquisition informationGift of Helen Clay Frick, 1953-1954.
updated09/12/2019 15:28:54
....................................................................


titleHenry Clay Frick Papers, Series I: Art Files, 1881-1925
repositoryThe Frick Collection and Frick Art Reference Library
collection titleHenry Clay Frick's Art Files, 1881-1925 and undated, consist of loose correspondence, one letterpress book, invoices, vouchers, canceled checks, inventories, lists, notes, and printed material pertaining to the selection, purchase, and disposition of works of art in Frick's collection. These papers also document requests to visit the galleries at One East 70th Street during Frick's lifetime, and works exhibited at institutions such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. A small number of items date from after Henry Clay Frick's death, and largely pertain to claims against the Frick Estate. These files do not represent a complete record of Frick's art collecting activities (see Related Material note above).

Materials are arranged in six subseries: I. Purchases, II. Inventories and Lists, III. Catalogs and Works Exhibited, IV. Correspondence, V. Works Not Purchased, and VI. Sale Catalogs and Miscellanea. Files are arranged chronologically within each subseries.

The bulk of these files are contained in the first subseries, Purchases. The amount of documentation varies greatly from one file to another, but consists largely of correspondence with dealers, invoices, canceled checks, and vouchers. Many files contain red expanding wallet envelopes with a custom-printed form on the front entitled "H.C. Frick: Paintings, Etc." These envelopes were used by Henry Clay Frick's office staff to house documents pertaining to his acquisitions, and on each one is noted the date of purchase, title, and artist, as well as names of correspondents, artists, other paintings mentioned in the file, the location of related material, and general remarks. These are referred to in the container list below as "red envelopes." It is not unusual for a file to contain only a red envelope, or purely transactional papers such as receipts and vouchers.

The next two subseries, Inventories and Lists, and Catalogs and Works Exhibited, also pertain to purchased works, but provide snapshots of Frick's collection at various periods in time. Many of the inventories and lists contained here predate the construction of One East 70th Street, and seem to have been prepared for bookkeeping purposes. They document paintings, and to a lesser extent furniture, at Frick's other residences, specifically "Clayton" in Pittsburgh, "Eagle Rock" in Prides Crossing, Mass., and the Vanderbilt mansion located at 640 Fifth Avenue in New York. The latter subseries, Catalogs and Works Exhibited, contains both published and unpublished descriptions of Frick's collection, and also provides some insight into the extent to which Frick allowed the public to view his collection. More information about public viewing of his gallery is contained in Subseries IV, Correspondence, which consists mostly of inquiries from individuals and groups who wished to see the collection when it was still part of a private home. This subseries also contains a letterpress book of Frick's replies on various matters related to art collecting and the administration of his collection. Correspondents in the letterbook include Charles Carstairs of the firm M. Knoedler & Co., Henry B. Culver, Alice Creelman, Roger Fry, Martin Gardiner Lane, Ricardo de Madrazo, and H. Silva White.

The last two subseries, Works Not Purchased, and Sale Catalogs and Miscellanea, mostly concern objects that never entered Frick's collection, although some works received more serious consideration than others. Such is the case with Holbein's Erasmus von Rotterdam and Goya's Tirana, the files of which both contain substantially more documentation than those for works offered to Frick and directly refused. The sale catalogs contained here largely describe decorative arts objects and works on paper. With the exception of George B. Warren's collection of miniature porcelains, which was purchased by Frick and displayed at his Massachusetts home, it has not been confirmed whether or not Frick purchased items from the other catalogs.

Biographical Note

Henry Clay Frick was born 19 December 1849, in West Overton, Pa. One of six children, his parents were John W. Frick, a farmer, and Elizabeth Overholt Frick, the daughter of a whiskey distiller and flour merchant. Frick ended his formal education in 1866 at the age of seventeen, and began work as a clerk at an uncle's store in Mt. Pleasant, Pa. In 1871, Frick borrowed money to purchase a share in a coking concern that would eventually become the H.C. Frick Coke Co. Over the next decade, Frick expanded his business through the acquisition of more coal lands and coke ovens, and joined forces with fellow industrialist Andrew Carnegie in 1882. He assumed the chairmanship of Carnegie Bros. & Co. (later Carnegie Steel Co.) in 1889. He served in that capacity until his resignation from the company in December 1899. During his tenure as chairman, differences between Frick and Carnegie emerged, most significantly in their approach to labor issues. The 1892 Homestead Strike further strained relations between the two men, and in 1899, after Carnegie attempted to buy out Frick's share in the company for a fraction of its value, Frick sued. Frick eventually received a satisfactory price for his shares, but permanently severed his relationship with Carnegie.

In December 1881, Frick married Adelaide Howard Childs of Pittsburgh. The couple purchased a house (called "Clayton") in the Homewood section of Pittsburgh, and had four children: Childs Frick (1883-1965), Martha Howard Frick (1885-1891), Helen Clay Frick (1888-1984), and Henry Clay Frick, Jr. (born 1892, died in infancy). After his break with Carnegie in 1899, Frick began spending more and more time on the East Coast of the United States. In 1905, he signed a ten-year lease on the Vanderbilt mansion at 640 Fifth Avenue in New York, and built an elaborate summer residence ("Eagle Rock") on Boston's North Shore, which was completed in 1906. Though Frick maintained his status as a Pittsburgh resident for the remainder of his life, he and his family chiefly divided their time between Massachusetts and New York. In 1907, Frick purchased land at the corner of Fifth Avenue and 70th Street. Construction of the new Frick residence, designed by Thomas Hastings of the firm Carrère and Hastings, began in 1912, after the wrecking of the Lenox Library formerly on the site. The family moved into the house at One East 70th Street in the fall of 1914, and Henry Clay Frick died there on 2 December 1919.

While there is evidence that Frick had an interest in art collecting as early as 1871, little is known about his early exposure to art, or his earliest acquisitions. His first recorded purchase occurred in 1881, when he acquired George Hetzel's Landscape with River. Frick purchased only a few paintings over the next decade, but by the mid-1890's, he was steadily acquiring new pictures at the rate of about one per month. His taste during this period ran toward contemporary French artists, such as Bouguereau and Cazin, and Barbizon School landscapes. After the turn of the century, however, Frick's taste shifted to eighteenth century English portraits and seventeenth century Dutch paintings, including works by Gainsborough, Lawrence, Vermeer, Cuyp, and Hobbema. He purchased his first Italian Renaissance painting, Titian's Pietro Aretino, along with the first of his eight Van Dycks in 1905, the same year he and his family took up residence in the Vanderbilt mansion at 640 Fifth Avenue in New York. Major acquisitions during this period include Rembrandt's Self-Portrait, El Greco's Purification of the Temple, a second painting by Vermeer ( Officer and Laughing Girl), and Holbein's Sir Thomas More. In 1914, the same year the Frick family moved into their newly constructed New York house at One East 70th Street, Frick's purchases included works by Gainsborough, Goya, Renoir, Turner and Whistler, among others. From 1915 until his death in 1919, Frick purchased fewer paintings overall, but added works by Bellini, Boucher, Bronzino, Hoppner, and Stuart, as well as additional works Titian, Holbein, and Vermeer.

Although Frick purchased from many dealers while building his collection, he heavily favored the firm of M. Knoedler & Co. Roland Knoedler, Charles Knoedler, and Charles Carstairs were considered friends as well as advisers on art, and Frick made more purchases through them than he did from any other source. One major exception to this, however, is Frick's association with Duveen Brothers. Although Frick's ties to this firm date back to 1906, when rugs, porcelains, and other objects were purchased for the Frick family's Massachusetts estate, it was not until after the death of J.P. Morgan in 1913 that Frick made his most important acquisitions from them. From 1915 through 1918, Frick purchased millions of dollars of Renaissance bronzes, Chinese porcelains, Limoges enamels, and furniture from the Morgan estate through Joseph Duveen. In 1915, Frick also agreed to purchase the series of panels by Fragonard entitled The Progress of Love (also referred to as The Romance of Love and Youth). The installation of these panels in the Frick residence necessitated a complete renovation of the drawing room in the newly completed house. In addition to Knoedler and Duveen, Frick acquired paintings through domestic and European galleries such as Arthur Tooth & Sons, L. Crist Delmonico, The Ehrich Galleries, and Durand-Ruel & Sons. Frick also occasionally acquired works through individuals, including Virginia P. Bacon, Alice Creelman, and Roger Fry.

Henry Clay Frick's acquisitions were carefully considered, and he often kept pictures on approval in his home for months before deciding whether to purchase or return them. In certain instances, though, works of art were bought sight unseen, or brought over from Europe at his expense but not purchased. As Frick's collection grew and his taste evolved, he sometimes returned works for credit towards another painting, and pictures were also sometimes acquired with the option to return them for full credit within a given period of time. In some cases, he actively sought the opinions of art experts such as Roger Fry, Carel F. de Wild, and Charles Henry Hart before consenting to an acquisition.

Although Frick continued to acquire works of art until his death in 1919 (his last purchase was Vermeer's Mistress and Maid), he quietly established plans to open his collection to the public after his death as early as 1915. In his will, dated 24 June 1915, Frick bequeathed his New York City residence, including furnishings, art, and decorative objects, as a museum "for the purpose of establishing and maintaining a gallery of art...and encouraging and developing the study of the fine arts, and of advancing the general knowledge of kindred subjects." The museum was endowed with funds for maintenance, building alterations, and acquisitions of art. Henry Clay Frick's widow continued to live at the residence until her death in 1931. At that time, the building was extensively renovated, and opened to the public as The Frick Collection in December 1935.

Related Materials
Helen Clay Frick, daughter of Henry Clay Frick, gave selected portions of these files to The Frick Collection in 1953. These materials are now available as the Henry Clay Art Collection Files in The Frick Collection/Frick Art Reference Library Archives. Additional related material may also be found in other series of the Henry Clay Frick Papers. Please see the archivist for more information.
extent8.9 Linear feet (18 boxes and one oversize folder)
formatsCorrespondence Financial Records Inventories Notes Printed Materials
accessThese records are open for research under the conditions of The Frick Collection/Frick Art Reference Library Archives access policy. Contact the Archives Department for further information at archives@frick.org.
record linkhttp://www.frick.org/sites/default/files/FindingAids/HenryClayFrickArtFiles.html
record sourcehttp://arcade.nyarc.org:80/record=b920826~S14
finding aidUnpublished finding aid available at the repository.
acquisition informationOn deposit from the Helen Clay Frick Foundation, 2001.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:02
....................................................................


titleHenry Clay Frick Papers, Series II: Correspondence 1882-1929, undated.
repositoryThe Frick Collection and Frick Art Reference Library
collection titleHenry Clay Frick's Correspondence series (1882-1929, and undated) consists chiefly of incoming letters, including circular letters, telegrams, statements, reports, memoranda, and notes, as well as enclosures and related material. In some cases, copies of Frick's outgoing responses are also included. Items in this series are arranged alphabetically, either by the last name of the correspondent, or by the name of the firm, organization, or publication (e.g. Chas. D. Barney and Co., Seamen's Church Institute, Princeton University, Scottdale Observer, etc.) In a handful of instances, materials are filed by subject (e.g. La Sarraz, Switzerland; painter Andrea del Sarto, etc.) Topics discussed in Frick's correspondence vary widely, and include business dealings, investments, art collecting, philanthropy, politics, real estate, and family matters.

The earliest items in this series date from 1882, and include correspondence with Andrew Carnegie and the distillery A. Overholt & Co. From the 1880s through the 1910s, though, Frick corresponded with a wide array of industrialists, bankers, investment firms, executives, and managers, and was a frequent correspondent with members of the Phipps, Mellon, Morgan, and Rockefeller families. Frick's principal business activities were in the areas of coal and coke, iron, steel, and railroads. Materials pertaining to these concerns may be found either under the name of the corporate entity or under the names of individual executives. For instance, in addition to the correspondence filed under Carnegie Steel Co., additional letters can be found under Andrew Carnegie, Millard Hunsiker, A.L. Griffin, J. Ogden Hoffman, F.T.F. Lovejoy, H.M. Curry, and John C. Fleming. Similarly, H.C. Frick Coke Co. correspondence also appears under the names Thomas Lynch, Robert Ramsay, and W.C. Magee. Other executives in the coke, steel, and railroad industries with whom Frick corresponded include Jay C. Morse, W.L. Brown, W.H. Donner, Elbert H. Gary, J.W. Gates, E.B. Leinsenring, Samuel Mather, George W. Perkins, Morris Ramsay, Josiah V. Thompson, and A.R. Whitney, as well as Alexander J. Cassatt, Samuel Rea, William H. Joyce, James McCrea, and John S. Wilson, all of the Pennsylvania Railroad. Examples of industrialists and bankers associated with Frick are Henry G. Morse, Carl C. Law, F.W. Haskell, S.L. Schoonmaker, H.C. McEldowney, and E.B. Morris. Also documented in this series are Frick's investments at various brokerage houses, largely through statements and transactional correspondence with firms such as Lee, Kretschmar and Co., Boissevain and Co., Charles Smith and Sons, James D. Smith and Co., and Kuhn, Loeb and Co.

Letters to Frick on the subject of art collecting range from offers of paintings and other objects available for purchase, to requests to visit Frick's gallery, to transactional correspondence regarding the purchase, framing, conservation, insurance and transport of paintings. Such letters are filed under the names of his principal art dealers, M. Knoedler and Co. and Charles Carstairs, as well as under Duveen Brothers, through whom Frick made acquisitions from J.P. Morgan's estate among other purchases, Roger Fry, who assisted Frick in the acquisition of Rembrandt's Polish Rider and also alerted Frick to the availability of other works, and Arthur Tooth & Son, through whom Frick purchased his first old master painting. Additional correspondents who wrote about acquisitions or possible acquisitions include Alice Creelman, Virginia P. Bacon, James H. Dunn, H. Silva White, Julius Oehme, and Jacques Seligmann, among numerous others. An index of works offered to Frick in these files is available, and additional art correspondence can be found in the Henry Clay Frick Papers, Series I: Art Files and in the Henry Clay Frick Art Collection Files in this repository.

Correspondence on philanthropic matters documents Frick's contributions to museums and other cultural institutions, colleges and universities, hospitals, churches, and civic organizations. These include the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Boston Museum of Fine Arts, American Museum of Natural History, the American Academy in Rome, Harvard University and its Arnold Arboretum, Princeton University, from which Frick's son Childs graduated in 1905, and Columbia University. Materials may be filed under the name of the institution, but can also appear under the names of officials and administrators, as in the case of John Grier Hibben of Princeton University, and Nicholas M. Butler of Columbia University. Notable civic organizations in receipt of Frick's assistance were the Pittsburgh Newsboys' Home, Pittsburgh Association for the Improvement of the Poor, Kingsley House Association, and the Henry Clay Frick Educational Commission, founded by Frick in 1909 with the assistance of Pittsburgh astronomer John Brashear.

In addition to his interests in business and art, Frick's papers also document his political activities. Though he himself never held office, he was a strong supporter of the Republican Party, and took an interest in both national politics and those in Pennsylvania, where he maintained legal residency and returned to cast his ballot annually. Frick had prominent political connections, as evidenced by correspondence with Senators Boies Penrose, M.S. Quay, and Philander Chase Knox (later a cabinet member to Presidents Roosevelt and Taft), Representative Edward E. Robbins, and Judge Joseph Buffington, Roosevelt's Treasury Secretary, Leslie M. Shaw, and Roosevelt's personal White House secretary, William Loeb, Jr. Frick's correspondence contains letters to and/or from all U.S. Presidents from Harrison through Wilson, though in some instances there is only a letter or two. The bulk of Frick's presidential correspondence is with Theodore Roosevelt, through whom Frick donated a painting to the White House in 1903. Topics discussed in Frick's political correspondence include campaign contributions, nominations and appointments, and the political climate of the time. Local politics and civic matters are also discussed, especially in the letters of H.D.W. English, Frank F. Nicola, and Pittsburgh mayor William A. Magee.

Frick's correspondence concerning real estate details the acquisition, improvement, and administration of property, whether for the family's personal use, or for commercial, industrial, or rental purposes. Of note is his correspondence with various architects of the period, including F.J. Osterling and F.E. Alden, who undertook projects at the Frick residence in Pittsburgh; Little & Browne, who designed the Frick house in Prides Crossing, Mass.; Thomas Hastings, architect of the Frick family's New York residence; Daniel Burnham, who designed the Frick Building in downtown Pittsburgh as well as the Frick monument in Homewood Cemetery; and Hunt & Hunt, who made alterations to the Vanderbilt mansion in New York during the time of the Frick family's residency there. Files of letters to and from George Lockhart Allen, a real estate and insurance broker based in Salem, Mass., document the acquisition of land for Frick's Prides Crossing estate, relations with his neighbors, and the social climate of the area at that time. Another correspondent of note, D.B. Kinch, was at times responsible for the administration of the Frick Building in Pittsburgh, and superintending the construction of the Frick residence in New York.

These letters sometimes give insight into Frick's personal interests and hobbies, especially those items documenting his memberships in various sporting, social, and fraternal organizations, as well as in correspondence with C.L. Charley, a Parisian auto dealer who imported cars for Frick, and the naval architectural firm of Tams, Lemoine and Crane, through whom he chartered a yacht just after the turn of the century. These papers also document aspects of Frick's private life and the operation of his office and household through correspondence with his immediate family (his wife Adelaide, son Childs, and daughter Helen Clay), members of the extended Frick, Childs, and Overholt families, employees at his various residences, and office staff in New York and Pittsburgh.

Preferred Citation
Henry Clay Frick Papers, Series II: Correspondence. The Frick Collection/Frick Art Reference Library Archives.
extent39.4 linear feet (95 boxes).
formatsCorrespondence
accessThese records are open for research under the conditions of The Frick Collection/Frick Art Reference Library Archives access policy. Contact the Archives Department for further information at archives@frick.org
record linkhttp://www.frick.org/sites/default/files/FindingAids/HCFCorrespondence.html
record sourcehttp://arcade.nyarc.org:80/record=b921750~S6
finding aidUnpublished finding aid available at the repository.
acquisition informationPlaced on deposit by the Helen Clay Frick Foundation, December 2001.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:02
....................................................................


titleDuveen Brothers Records, 1876-1981, bulk 1909-1964
repositoryThe Getty Research Institute
collection titleThe records provide an detailed view of the Duveen Brothers business activities in London, Paris, and New York. Although the archive extends from 1876-1981, the bulk of the material dates from Joseph Duveen's tenure as president of the firm, 1909-1939, and the period from 1939 to 1964 when Edward Fowles directed the firm (with Armand Lowengard until 1943). The mass of documents, such as cables and letters, invoices, and ledger and stock books, give a day-by-day account of art dealing, business strategy, and the individuals involved

NOTE Series I (ca. 112 linear feet) contains the firm's business records. Stock books indicate where objects were sent for repair, to whom objects were sent on approbation along with the date of sale and the price realized. Invoices include receipts, sales invoices sent to clients, lists of cablegrams and shipment of stock from each branch of the business

Series II (ca. 155 linear feet) consists of papers and correspondence which broadly cover the interaction between the Duveen Brothers firm and its clients, business associates, and the public. The correspondence describes art collecting trends among museums and individuals, the availability and purchase of art, art research and authentication, and the firm's general business practices. Eleven boxes of correspondence with Bernard Berenson detail his business relationship with the firm. Also included are records of lawsuits, correspondence between branches (some written in code), correspondence with museums, papers regarding galleries, Edward Fowles' papers, papers concerning exhibitions and loans, and papers regarding major art collectors and consultants. Some records of Kleinberger Galleries (apparently the papers of Harry G. Sperling, president) form a subseries within this series, and contain correspondence

Series III (c. 127 linear feet) includes some photographs, indices, negatives, and x-rays. This series represents the Duveen Brother's stock of images. Indices are available for the majority of the negatives in cold storage

("X Book" (Berenson transaction) is the only unique Duveen document not transferred to the GRI. It has not yet been photocopied. The "X Book" details, for a limited number (about 250) of Italian paintings in which Berenson had a financial interest, precise dates of purchase and sale, primarily in the years 1910-27. There is no index.) AAM

LOCATION
Watson Library Reference

CALL NUMBER
Microfilm Cabinet
extentCa. 394 linear ft. 584 boxes, glass negative cabinets, and 18 flat file folders. 422 microfilm reels : positive ; 35mm
formatsPhotographs X rays Correspondence Financial Records Inventories
accessMicrofilm of the archive is available for use by qualified researchers. The archive is restricted because of extreme fragility
record linkhttp://archives2.getty.edu:8082/xtf/view?docId=ead/960015/960015.xml;query=;brand=default
record sourcehttp://hdl.handle.net/10020/cat386523
finding aidUnpublished finding aid available in the repository and on the repository's Web site: folder level control. See the following web page digitization information: http://www.getty.edu/research/institute/development_partnerships/2011_kress.html
acquisition informationEdward Fowles donated the Duveen Brothers records to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1968. The Metropolitan gave the records to the Getty Research Library in 1996.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:02
....................................................................


titlePapers of James Bonar, 1886-1924
repositoryUniversity of Pittsburgh, Libraries
collection titleThe papers of James Bonar contain correspondence, scrapbooks, and memorabilia.

Biographical and Historical Note:
James Bonar was born in Dunfermline, Scotland, the birthplace of Andrew Carnegie, and was educated in London, England. Bonar came to the United States in 1884 and was employed in the machine shop of the Carnegie Steel Company for twelve years. When the Pittsburgh Gage and Supply Company was organized in 1893, Bonar, along with William Rogers, was a principal organizer and was selected to act as secretary of the company. Several years later, Bonar organized the firm of James Bonar and Company for the handling of all kinds of steam appliances and conducted this business for fifteen years. After the outbreak of World War I, he was made superintendent of expediting with the U.S. Steel Corporation. In 1919, Bonar was selected as Superintendent of Buildings by the Pittsburgh Board of Public Education. James Bonar was also an artist and served for many years as President of the Associated Artists of Pittsburgh. His paintings were exhibited at the Corcoran Art Gallery, St. Louis Museum of Art, the Memorial Hall in Philadelphia, and in Pittsburgh. Among his paintings were those entitled Eliza Furnaces, Clinton Furnace, Hubbard Furnace, October in the Alleghenies, Ligonier Fall Scene, and Across Sixth Street Bridge. In the forward to the program note for the 1920 Bonar Exhibition of Painting at the J.J. Gillespie and Company Gallery in Pittsburgh, John L. Porter wrote, "but some there were of such undaunted courage and perseverance, that by steady, unrelenting effort, they were able to turn the thoughts of some of these people into seeing a weird beauty in the great steel plants with their ever-changing halos of steam and smoke, in bridges, river activities, cliffs, inclines and hillside frescoes."
extent42 pieces, 1 folder, 2 scrapbooks cubic feet
formatsCorrespondence Ephemera Scrapbooks
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies.
record linkhttp://digital.library.pitt.edu/cgi-bin/f/findaid/findaid-idx?type=simple;c=ascead;view=text;subview=outline;didno=US-PPiU-ais196513
record sourcehttp://pittcat.pitt.edu/
finding aidAvailable in repository and on Internet
acquisition informationGift of Mrs. Bonar, daughter-in-law of James Bonar, on June 11, 1965.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:02
....................................................................


titleJohn Powell Lenox collection, 1887-1924 (MssCol 3448)
repositoryNew York Public Library, Manuscripts and Archives Division
collection titleCollection consists of correspondence relating to Lenox's collection of pictures clipped from magazines, newspapers and other sources relating to the life of Christ. Correspondents include Abraham Archibald Anderson, Otto Walter Beck, Edward A. Fellowes-Prynne, Henry Clay Frick, Edgar J. Goodspeed, Lord Ronald Gower, Walter Hampden, William S. Hart, Burton Holmes, Victor F. Lawson, Caleb Arnold Slade, Franklin Hamilton Spearman, Augustus Vincent Tack, Henry Van Dyke, and Payne Whitney.

Biographical and Historical Note:
John Powell Lenox (1851-1926) was an American lecturer and author.
extent.2 linear foot (1 box)
formatsClippings Correspondence Ephemera
accessApply in Special Collections Office.
record linkhttp://catalog.nypl.org/record=b12428462~S1
record sourcehttp://catalog.nypl.org/record=b12428462~S1
updated11/12/2014 11:30:02
....................................................................


titleAugust Jaccaci papers, 1889-1935 (bulk 1904-1914).
repositoryArchives of American Art
collection titleLetters, mostly concerning Jaccaci's joint editorship with John La Farge of the book, Noteworthy Paintings in American Collections; typescript pages of research material relating to the book and photographs (unmicrofilmed) of works of art. The papers cover the one published volume as well as the unrealized volumes. Also included are photographs of early American wall stencils.

The collection documents Jaccaci's work as an art historian, writer, and editor, primarily during the period he researched, compiled, and published his book, "Noteworthy Paintings in Private American Collections." More than one-half of the collection consists of extensive correspondence to and from many notable artists, collectors, and art historians, including John La Farge, Kenyon Cox, Isabella Stewart Gardner, and Bernard Sickert concerning the research and publication of the book. The papers also house legal files, writings and notes, art collection research files, and photographs of artwork.

Correspondents include art historians, critic, artists, and art collectors, as well as publishers, photographers, printers, and agents. These letters discuss the research of famous American art collections, writing of essays for the book, and the book production and publication. There is extensive correspondence with his co-editor John La Farge, and with his employee Carl Snyder who was working in Europe. Other correspondence is with magazines, art associations, academic institutions, and French service organizations. Also included is a small amount of personal correspondence with friends and colleagues.

Correspondents, many of whom were contributors, include Samuel H. Adams, American Academy in Rome, R. B. Angus, Sir Walter Armstrong, John W. Beatty, Cecilia Beaux, Bernard Berenson, Ernest L. Blumenschein, Wilhelm Bode, Louis De Monvel Boutet, James Britton, George De Forest Brush, Bryson Burroughs, Charles H. Caffin, Alexis Carrel, Mary Cassatt, Willa Cather, John Jay Chapman, Sir Martin Conway, Kenyon Cox, Eyre Crowe, Elsie De Wolfe, William H. Downes, Charles L. Freer, Daniel C. French, Max Friedlander, Roger Fry, Isabella Gardner, Jules Guiffrey, Jay Hambidge, Charles Henry Hart, James J. Hill, Lewis C. Hind, Sir Charles J. Holmes, Elbert Hubbard, James Huneker, Samuel Isham, Thayer Jaccaci, Bettina E. Johnson, John La Farge, Oliver La Farge, Ernest Lawson, Will H. Low, Frank J. Mather, Henry McCarter, Samuel McClure, Francis D. Millet, Paul E. More, George F. Of, Ivan Olinsky, Walter Pach, Ernest Peixotto, Elizabeth Pennell, Michael I. Pupin, Jean F. Raffaelli, Salomon Reinach, Henry Reuterdahl, Corrado Ricci, Jean P. Richter, Gisela M. Richter, Frederic Sherman, Bernhard Sickert, Osvald Siren, Joseph L. Steffens, Ida Tarbell, Anne Taylor, Carl Taylor, Alexander Teixeira de Mattos, Wilhelm Valentiner, John C. Van Dyke, Adolfo Venturi, J. Alden Weir, John F. Weir, William A. White, Helen H. Whitney, and Rufus Zogbaum.

Research material includes information on the following collections: R. B. Angus, George Baker, Charles T. Barney, August Belmont, Chauney J. Blair, Cleveland Burke, A. M. Byers, Thomas M. Davis, G. A. Drummond, William L. Elkins, James W. Ellsworth, Henry Clay Frick, Isabella S. Gardner, J. W. Gates, George Jay Gould, L. C. Hanna, Henry O.Havemeyer, John Hay, James J. Hill, Charles L Hutchinson, Hyers, John J. Johnson, Mr. Lodge, Frank G. Logan, Cyrus Hall and R. Hall McCormick, James H. McFadden, Emerson McMillan, Samuel Mather, Frank G. Morgan, Horace Morison, Ada Brooks Pope, James Ross, Martin A. Ryerson, Albert A. Sprague, Charles W. Taft, Herbert L. Terrell, Edward R. Thomas, William H. Vanderbilt, William Van Horne, J. H. Wade, Harris Whittemore and P. A. B. Widener. Also included (reel D126) are photographs of early American wall stencils. Forty-eight unmicrofilmed photographs of works of art are from the Henry C. Frick, William Van Horne, and P. A. B. Widener files.

Legal files include contracts and legal agreements for the August F. Jaccaci Company, as well as legal agreements with John La Farge concerning the research and publication of their joint book. Writings and notes include Jaccaci's lists and notes pertaining to the Noteworthy Paintings project, as well as other miscellaneous notes. Also found are writings by John La Farge that include drafts of a book, lectures, and notes about his artwork. Writings by others in this series also include draft essays by many art historians for Jaccaci's book. For the Noteworthy Paintings project, Jaccaci created numerous research files for American art collections and collectors that would be included. These research files include lists of works of art, essays and other notes about the collection written by prominent art historians. Photographs are of works of art supporting the research files. Also found in this collection are photographs of and notes about New England stencil designs. It is unclear what the connection is between Jaccaci and the stencil designs.

Author(s):
Jaccaci, Augusto Floriano, 1857-1930.
Beaux, Cecilia,; 1855-1942.
Berenson, Bernard,; 1865-1959.
Blumenschein, Ernest Leonard,; 1874-1960.
Bode, Wilhelm von,; 1845-1929.
Boutet de Monvel, Louis-Maurice,; 1851-1913.
Britton, James,; 1878-1936.
Brush, George de Forest,; 1855-1941.
Burroughs, Bryson,; 1869-1934.
Caffin, Charles Henry,; 1854-1918.
Carrel, Alexis,; 1873-1944.
Cassatt, Mary,; 1844-1926.
Cather, Willa,; 1873-1947.
Chapman, John Jay,; 1862-1933.
Conway, William Martin,; Sir,; 1856-1937.
Cox, Kenyon,; 1856-1919.
Crowe, Eyre,; Sir,; 1864-1925.
De Wolfe, Elsie,; 1865-1950.
Downes, William Howe,; 1854-1941.
Freer, Charles Lang,; 1856-1919.
French, Daniel Chester,; 1850-1931.
Friedländer, Max J.,; 1867-1958.
Fry, Roger Eliot,; 1866-1934.
Gardner, Isabella Stewart,; 1840-1924.
Guiffrey, Jules,; 1840-1918.
Hambidge, Jay,; 1867-1924.
Hart, Charles Henry,; 1847-1918.
Hill, James Jerome,; 1838-1916.
Hind, C. Lewis; 1862-1927. ; (Charles Lewis),
Holmes, C. J.; 1868-1936. ; (Charles John),
Hubbard, Elbert,; 1856-1915.
Huneker, James,; 1857-1921.
Isham, Samuel,; 1855-1914.
Jaccaci, Thayer.
Johnson, Bettina Eastman.
La Farge, John,; 1835-1910.
La Farge, Oliver,; 1901-1963.
Lawson, Ernest,; 1873-1939.
Low, Will Hicok,; 1853-1932.
Mather, Frank Jewett,; 1868-1953.
McCarter, Henry,; 1866-1942.
McClure, S. S.; 1857-1949. ; (Samuel Sidney),
Millet, Francis Davis,; 1846-1912.
More, Paul Elmer,; 1864-1937.
Of, George F.; b. 1876. ; (George Ferdinand),
Olinsky, Ivan G.; 1878-1962. ; (Ivan Gregorewitch),
Pach, Walter,; 1883-1958.
Peixotto, Ernest,; b. 1869.
Pennell, Elizabeth Robins,; 1855-1936.
Pupin, Michael Idvorsky,; 1858-1935.
Raffaëlli, Jean François,; 1850-1924.
Reinach, Salomon,; 1858-1932.
Reuterdahl, Henry,; 1871-1925.
Ricci, Corrado,; 1858-1934.
Richter, Gisela Marie Augusta,; 1882-1972.
Richter, Jean Paul,; 1847-1937.
Sherman, Frederic Fairchild,; 1874-1940.
Sickert, Bernard,; 1862-1932.
Sirén, Osvald,; 1879-
Steffens, Lincoln,; 1866-1936.
Tarbell, Ida M.; 1857-1944. ; (Ida Minerva),
Taylor, Anne.
Taylor, Carl.
Teixeira de Mattos, Alexander,; 1865-1921.
Valentiner, Wilhelm Reinhold,; 1880-1958.
Van Dyke, John Charles,; 1856-1932.
Venturi, Adolfo,; 1856-1941.
Weir, Julian Alden,; 1852-1919.
Weir, John F.; b. 1841. ; (John Ferguson),
White, William Allen,; 1868-1944.
Whitney, Helen Hay,; 1875-1944.
Zogbaum, Rufus F.,; 1849-1925.
Adams, Samuel Hopkins,; 1871-1958.
Angus, R. B.
Armstrong, Walter,; Sir,; 1850-1918.
Beatty, John W.; 1851-1924. ; (John Wesley)

Bio / His Notes:
Jaccaci, a mural painter and writer, was born in France and came to the United States in the 1880s. He and painter John La Farge were editors for what they hoped would be a multi-volume series to be called Noteworthy Paintings in Private Collections. The first volume was published in 1907, but with the untimely death of La Farge, Jaccaci abandoned the project.
extent7.2 linear ft. (partially microfilmed on 9 reels)
formatsCorrespondence Photographs Research Files Notes Legal Files
accessPatrons must use microfilm copy. Use of unmicrofilmed portion requires an appointment.
record sourcehttp://www.siris.si.edu/
finding aidFinding Aid in repository and on repository's Web site.
acquisition informationPapers were purchased from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, which had acquired them for director Francis Henry Taylor's research for Taste of Angels.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:02
....................................................................


titleOral history interview with William Milliken, 1974 Dec. 27-1976 Mar. 13.
repositoryArchives of American Art
collection titleAn interview of William Milliken conducted by Dennis Barrie for the Archives of American Art. Milliken speaks of his family background and history; his childhood; his education, and studies at Princeton; his first position as Assistant Curator of Decorative Arts at the Metropolitan Museum; his involvement with the Frick and the Cooper Union Museum;
his appointment to the Cleveland Museum of Art in 1919, and becoming its director in 1930. He recalls William R. Valentiner, Jacques Seligmann, Isabella Stewart Gardner, J.P. Morgan, Henry Frick and others.

Bio / His Notes: Museum director; d. 1978. Director of the Cleveland Museum of Art, 1930-1958.
extent5 sound tape reels ; 5 in. (106 p. transcript)
formatsSound Recording Transcript
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies.
record sourcehttp://www.siris.si.edu/
acquisition informationThese interviews are part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:02
....................................................................


titleEagle Rock 1917-1986.
repositoryArchives of American Gardens
collection titleThe folder includes worksheets.

General Note:
Eagle Rock, a 104-room brick "cottage" in the neoclassical style, was set in a romantic, 25-acre landscape. Built in 1904, this house became Henry Clay Frick's summer house. In 1969, tired of maintaining a house Helen Frick considered pretentious, she "carefully demolished" Eagle Rock, sending the billiard room paneling, the car and carriage collection and sections of wrought iron fence to the Frick Art Museum she was building near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
extent1 folder+ 39 35 mm. slides and 13 glass autochromes.
formatsSlides
accessAccess to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. For information or study purposes only. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
bibliographyProperty featured in The Henry Clay Frick Houses by Martha Frick Symington Sanger.
record sourcehttp://www.siris.si.edu/
acquisition informationReproduction: There are two duplicate 35 mm. slides (MA075030) copied from an original postcard, which is not in the collection. Six 35 mm. slides are copies of original glass lantern slides. One 35 mm. slide (MA075049) is copy of original painting belonging to Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities. Loc. of Assoc. Material: Plans and drawing exist in the Olmsted Association. Drawings and photographs are located at the Helen C. Frick Foundation in Pittsburgh, PA. Drawings by Arthur Little are located in the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities.
updated08/25/2017 14:53:12
....................................................................


titleCarnegie Steel Company records 1853-1912 (1869-1912) [manuscript]
repositoryHistorical Society of Western Pennsylvania
collection titleThe Carnegie Steel Company records are housed in eighty-eight archival boxes and arranged in four series. Series have been designated for Andrew Carnegie, Corporation records, business records and index and research files. These materials include correspondence, letter books, financial materials, organizational materials, legal documents, news clippings, publications and other sundry materials.

The papers primarily relate to Carnegie's philanthropic, financial and business concerns. The papers lack a personal side to Carnegie. They focus on the costs, payments and investments. Even Carnegie's personal correspondence centers on the economics of his leisure time. This is quite evident in his correspondence in series one relative to his horses and stables in Cresson, Pa. The majority of the papers have been transcribed and in most cases, a carbon copy of the transcriptions also exists. The transcriptions have maintained with the original. In some cases, additional copies were made and grouped together by subject. These subject files have been maintained and placed at the end of each relevant category.


Historical Note
The Carnegie Steel Company was the final conglomeration of several steelworks, bridge companies and coke works under Andrew Carnegie. Beginning with the firm of Carnegie, Kloman and Company, Andrew Carnegie created several more steelworks and other companies eventually becoming the largest producer of steel in the world, while also becoming the richest man in the world.

In 1901, Carnegie sold his interests in his company to financier J.P. Morgan, leading to the development of the United States Steel Corporation, which later became USX Corporation. After retiring from business, Carnegie set his ambition towards philanthropic activities. Among his efforts were the thousands of libraries created throughout Europe and North America.

Altogether, Carnegie gave away over $350 million.


Archives Collection
MSS 0315
extent49.50 linear ft
formatsBusiness Papers Research Files Correspondence Financial Records Legal Papers
accessNone.
record sourcehttp://digital.library.pitt.edu/hswp/
finding aidInventory available
updated11/12/2014 11:30:06
....................................................................


titleWill of Henry C. Frick, 1919
repositoryHistorical Society of Western Pennsylvania
collection titleArchives Collection
MFF 0827
extent.05 linear ft.
formatsLegal Papers
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies.
record sourcehttp://digital.library.pitt.edu/hswp/
updated11/12/2014 11:30:06
....................................................................


titleJames Waldo Fawcett papers 1847-1968 [manuscript] bulk 1963-1968
repositoryHistorical Society of Western Pennsylvania
collection titleJames Waldo Fawcett was born October 23, 1893, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the son of James Thomas and Mary (Herron) Fawcett. At eleven years of age he became a regular contributor to the Pittsburgh Dispatch. Later, he moved to Washington, D.C., and was an editor for the Washington Post, then editorial writer for the Star, a position he held for 23 years. These papers include correspondence, research notes, newspaper clippings, speeches, book reviews and other sundry materials.

Archives Collection
MSS 0152

Preferred Citation:
Papers of James Waldo Fawcett, 1847-1968, MSS#152, Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania

extent.75 linear ft.
formatsCorrespondence Research Files Clippings Writings Ephemera
accessThis collection is open for research.
record linkhttp://digital.library.pitt.edu/cgi-bin/f/findaid/findaid-idx?type=simple;c=hswpead;view=text;subview=outline;didno=MSS152
record sourcehttp://digital.library.pitt.edu/hswp/
finding aidOnline finding aid has been encoded as a part of the Historic Pittsburgh project a joint effort of the University of Pittsburgh and the Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania. Funding for this portion of the project has been donated by the Hillman Foundation.
acquisition informationThese papers came in one accession in 1970.Acc# 1970x Gift of James Waldo Fawcett, 1960-1967, and of his estate, 1970, (Papers).
updated11/12/2014 11:30:06
....................................................................


titleJunta records 1882-1984 [manuscript]
repositoryHistorical Society of Western Pennsylvania
collection titleRecords include correspondence, financial records, minutes, programs, and speeches, documenting the club's activities and organization. The speeches cover a variety of topics.

Historical Note
The Junta was founded in 1882 as an all male club that met monthly to discuss various intellectual issues. Membership was limited to thirty-five and included influential men of the community.

Archives Collection
MSS 0039

extent4.75 linear ft.
formatsCorrespondence Financial Records Administrative Records
accessNone. Contact repository for restrictions and policies.
record linkhttp://padl.pitt.edu/index.php/record/view/116462
record sourcehttp://digital.library.pitt.edu/hswp/
finding aidInventory available.
acquisition informationRobert Alberts gift records 1975 1975.175 These materials were received in four accessions and combined into one body of records in 1976. For a complete list, see finding aid. Processed MSS #39 8/18/93 E. Clougherty.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:06
....................................................................


titleGeorge Dilworth papers 1861-1892 [manuscript]
repositoryHistorical Society of Western Pennsylvania
collection titlePapers include letters to his wife, a letter from his daughter discussing the attempt on the life of Henry C. Frick and a typed manuscript, "The Dilworth Letters", by Nancy Foster.

George Dilworth was a partner in Dilworth Brothers, a leading wholesale grocery firm in Pittsburgh.


Processed, no inventory MFF 2217 4/18/94 A. Roberts.

Archives Collection
MFF 2217

extent .05 linear ft.
formatsPersonal Papers Correspondence
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies.
record sourcehttp://digital.library.pitt.edu/hswp/
acquisition informationFoster, William gift papers 1976 76:124, 80:164 Gift of William Foster, 1976.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:06
....................................................................


titleRobert D. Christie papers 1889-1967 [manuscript]
repositoryHistorical Society of Western Pennsylvania
collection titlePapers include correspondence, speeches, genealogical and historical research notes, photographs, newspaper clippings and other sundry items documenting Christie's research work on prominent residents, regional history and the Johnstown Flood of 1889.

Mrs. Robert D. Christie Gift Papers 1975 1975x Robert D. Christie was a historian, lecturer and director of the Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania, who researched the Johnstown Flood of 1889.

Archives Collection
MSS 0153
extent1.5 linear ft.
formatsPersonal Papers Writings Research Files Clippings
accessNone. Contact repository for restrictions and policies.
record sourcehttp://digital.library.pitt.edu/hswp/
finding aidInventory available.
acquisition informationGift of Mrs. Robert D. Christie, 1975. Processed MSS #153 1/16/95 S. Riccardi
updated11/12/2014 11:30:06
....................................................................


titleHenry C. Frick Educational Commission records 1909-1993 [manuscript]
repositoryHistorical Society of Western Pennsylvania
collection titleRecords include correspondence, grant proposals and reports, budgets, newsclippings, printed materials, and other sundry items providing comprehensive documentation of the educational programs funded by the commission from 1944 to 1989. Some of the commission's activities prior to 1944 are also documented, particularly the summer conferences and scholarship program.

Henry C. Frick Educational Commission Gift Records 1981.0050

Henry C. Frick Educational Commission Gift 1993 1993.0025 Records

Buhl Foundation Gift 1995 Records 1995.0131

The Henry C. Frick Educational Commission has provided scholarships for public school teachers and has funded educational programs in Allegheny, Fayette, Greene, Washington and Westmoreland Counties since 1909. Founded by industrialist Henry C. Frick, the Commission became the Frick Educational Fund of the Buhl Foundation in 1993.

Gift of the Henry C. Frick Educational Commission in 1981 and 1993 and the Buhl Foundation in 1995.

Processed MSS #148 5/31/95 S. Illis

Archives Collection
MSS 0148
extent40 linear ft.
formatsCorrespondence Writings Clippings Printed Materials
accessNone.
record sourcehttp://digital.library.pitt.edu/hswp/
finding aidInventory available.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:06
....................................................................


titleMothers Organizing Mothers collection includes minutes, correspondence and membership lists also materials on Clayton, the Henry Clay Frick house.
repositoryHistorical Society of Western Pennsylvania
collection titleArchives Collection
1999.0008
extent.10 linear ft.
formats
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies.
record sourcehttp://digital.library.pitt.edu/hswp/
updated11/12/2014 11:30:06
....................................................................


titleCatalogue of the Frick Collection (Photocopy)
repositoryHistorical Society of Western Pennsylvania
collection titleArchives Collection
MFF 0828
extent.05 linear ft.
formatsPhotocopies
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies.
record sourcehttp://digital.library.pitt.edu/hswp/
updated11/12/2014 11:30:06
....................................................................


titleBooklet on the Frick Building, 1905
repositoryHistorical Society of Western Pennsylvania
collection titleArchives Collection
MFF 0826
extent.05 linear ft.
formats
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
record sourcehttp://digital.library.pitt.edu/hswp/
updated11/12/2014 11:30:06
....................................................................


titleErskine Ramsay Papers, 1886-1953.
repositoryBirmingham Public Library
collection titleThe Erskine Ramsay Papers consist of correspondence, reports, speeches, newspaper clippings, photographs, blueprints, and maps documenting Ramsay's career in the mining and steel manufacturing industries in Birmingham, Ala. for the years 1886 to 1953.

For the period of Ramsay's employment by the Tennessee Coal, Iron, and Railroad Company, 1887-1901, there is correspondence and reports which reflect the economic and managerial difficulties of the company and provide statistical data on its yearly production. For the years 1902-1953, the Papers provide information on Ramsay's continued involvement in the mining and steel industries, his work with local charities, and his term of service as a member and later president of the Birmingham Board of Education, 1922-1941.

Also included is a substantial amount of geneological information on the Ramsay family.

Bio/History
Mining engineer, inventor, business executive, philanthropist, and member and president of Birmingham, Ala. Board of Education.

Organized into five series: I. Correspondence. II. Charities. III. Honors. IV. Biography. V. Miscellaneous.

Location
CenLH Arch
extent4 linear ft. (5 boxes).
formatsCorrespondence Business Papers Writings Clippings Ephemera
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
record linkhttp://vulcan.bham.lib.al.us/record=b1356570~S1
record sourcehttp://vulcan.bham.lib.al.us/search~S1/
finding aidUnpublished inventory available in the library.
acquisition informationGift of the Ramsay family, 1953.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:06
....................................................................


titlePapers of Philander C. Knox, 1893-1922 (bulk 1901-1921).
repositoryLibrary of Congress
collection titleCorrespondence, scrapbooks, memoranda, clippings, cartoons, printed matter, speeches and articles, bills and resolutions, drafts, biographical sketches, legal papers, notebooks, reports, and library catalog. Most detailed for the years during which Knox served as U.S. attorney general under McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt, U.S. secretary of state under Taft, and U.S. senator from Pennsylvania.

Topics include the antitrust prosecution of the Northern Securities Company, the reorganization of the Interstate Commerce Commission, thefounding of the Dept. of Commerce and Labor, railroad rate legislation, the Panama Canal and Panama toll revision, Latin American affairs, relations with Russia, China, and other countries, the Versailles treaty and the League of Nations, and efforts to promote Knox as a Presidential candidate.

Correspondents include Chandler P. Anderson, Newton D. Baker, Albert J. Beveridge, Charles J. Bonaparte, William E. Borah, Andrew Carnegie, J. Reuben Clark, George B. Cortelyou, HarryM. Daugherty, W. A. Day, Henry Clay Frick, Mark Hanna, Warren G. Harding, John Hay, James J. Hill, George Hoar, Henry M. Hoyt, Hiram Johnson, William Loeb, William McKinley, Andrew W. Mellon, Samuel W. Pennypacker, Boies Penrose, Matthew S. Quay, Whitelaw Reid, Theodore Roosevelt, Elihu Root, John C. Spooner, William H. Taft, George W. Wickersham, and Huntington Wilson.

Biographical/Historical Data:
Lawyer and public official.

Manuscript Reading Room (Madison, LM101)
CALL NUMBER: 0555J

extent75 containers.
formatsCorrespondence Scrapbooks Ephemera Financial Records Legal Papers
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies
record linkhttp://lccn.loc.gov/mm 78028852
record sourcehttp://catalog.loc.gov/
finding aidFinding aid available in the Library of Congress Manuscript Reading Room.
acquisition informationGift, Mrs. James R. Tindle, 1929.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:06
....................................................................


titlePapers of Andrew Carnegie, 1803-1935 (bulk 1890-1919).
repositoryLibrary of Congress
collection titleCorrespondence, reports, memoranda, speeches, articles, book files, financial papers, printed materials, and other papers relating to Carnegie’s steel manufacturing and other business and philanthropic activities. Topics include African Americans, corporations, education, imperialism, industrial arbitration, industrial relations, investments, Panama Canal, peace, and Scottish Americans. Includes materials concerning the Carnegie Corporation of New York, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, Pa., Carnegie Institution of Washington, and Carnegie Steel Corporation.

Correspondents include Lord Acton, Lord Balfour, John Barrett, James P. Bertram, William Jennings Bryan, Lord Bryce, Nicholas Murray Butler, Joseph Hodges Choate, Samuel Harden Church, Samuel Langhorne Clemens, Grover Cleveland, W. Evans Darby, Frank Nelson Doubleday, Theodore W. Dwight, Charles William Eliot, Robert Erskine Ely, Baron d’Estournelle de Constant, Robert A. Franks, Henry Clay Frick, Richard Watson Gilder, Daniel Coit Gilman, W. E. Gladstone, Lord Grey of Fallodon, Edward Everett Hale, William Vernon Harcourt, John Hay, Abram S. Hewitt, Robert Green Ingersoll, Robert Underwood Johnson, Philander C. Knox, George Lauder, Sr., George Lauder, Jr., David Lloyd George, Henry Cabot Lodge, Francis T. F. Lovejoy, Seth Low, and Frederick H. Lynch.

Correspondents also include Theodore Marburg, S. S. McClure, Nelson Appleton Miles, Thomas N. Miller, J. Pierpont Morgan, John Morley, Simon Newcomb, Walter Hines Page, Alton Brooks Parker, George Foster Peabody, Henry Phipps, Henry S. Pritchett, Whitelaw Reid, John D. Rockefeller, Theodore Roosevelt, Elihu Root, John Ross, Carl Schurz, Charles M. Schwab, James Brown Scott, William H. Short, Goldwin Smith, James Carnegie (Earl of Southesk), Herbert Spencer, Hermann Speck von Sternberg, Oscar S. Straus, James Moore Swank, William H. Taft, Charles L. Taylor, J. Edgar Thomson, Charlemagne Tower, Joseph P. Tumulty, Booker T. Washington, Andrew Dickson White, Henry White, Horace White, Francis Mairs Huntington-Wilson, Woodrow Wilson, and Robert Simpson Woodward.
extent72 linear feet.
formatsClippings Correspondence Ephemera Writings Printed Materials
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies.
record sourcehttp://catalog.loc.gov
finding aidFinding aid available in the Library of Congress Manuscript Reading Room. Index to correspondents available in the Library of Congress Manuscript Reading Room.
acquisition informationGift, Mrs. Andrew Carnegie, Margaret Carnegie Miller, Florence Anderson, and the Carnegie Corporation of New York, 1932-1983. Other gifts and purchases, 1946-1996.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:06
....................................................................


titleMaterials relating to Helen C. Frick vs. Sylvester K. Stevens, 1967.
repositoryMinnesota Historical Society
collection titlePhotographic copies of an opinion (51 leaves) issued by Judge Clinton R. Weidner, Court of Common Pleas, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, in the case, Helen C. Frick vs. Sylvester K. Stevens, and two editorials (2 leaves) regarding the case. The lawsuit was brought by Helen C. Frick against Sylvester K. Stevens "for a permanent injunction to enjoin and prohibit the sale and distribution of a book entitled, 'Pennsylvania: Birthplace of a Nation' written by the defendant..." Miss Frick's contention was that statements concerning Henry C. Frick, her father, were "false, scandalous, malicious and defamatory." The case was decided in favor of the defendant.

Also included are copies of two editorials commenting on the case published in the Minneapolis Tribune and the St. Paul Dispatch.
extent1 folder (incl. 3 items).
formatsLegal Papers Clippings
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies.
finding aidA printed version of this catalog record is available in the repository; filed as P549.
acquisition informationOriginals: Court of Common Pleas; Cumberland County, PA
updated11/12/2014 11:30:06
....................................................................


titleD.H. Burnham & Co. Records, ca. 1891-1912.
repositoryThe Getty Research Institute
collection titleThe archive contains correspondence files, alphabetically arranged, for the major projects undertaken by the firm, including: The World’s Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893, for which Burnham served as chief of construction; the city plan for Washington, D.C. (1901) and for Chicago (1909); the Philippine Carnival (1911); and the reconstruction of San Francisco (1906). Correspondents include politicians, architects, sculptors and prominent civic leaders such as Charles Eliot Norton, Henry Bacon (regarding the Lincoln Memorial), Charles Moore (on the plan for Washington) and Frank Millett.

The activities of the Commission of Fine Arts are particularly well-documented. Other important figures represented include Henry Clay Frick, Cass Gilbert, Frederick Law Olmsted (with a sketch of his Liberty, or America for the Grand Basin at the World’s Columbian Exposition - 900203*), Augustus and Louis Saint-Gaudens, Johannes Gelert, Jules Gúerin, Thomas Hastings, Richard Morris Hunt, Philander Knox, and Lorado Taft. Writings by Burnham in the collection include a draft of a speech delivered in 1897 before the Merchant’s Club of Chicago on life in Chicago, and another speech, or essay, entitled "The Appearance of the City."

Biographical or Historical Notes:
Chicago architectural firm established by Daniel Hudson Burnham.

Arrangement:
Organization: Box I. Files B-F; Box II. Files G-LA; Box III. Files LI-OK; Box IV. Files OL-V.

Notes:
Mss. (holographs, typescripts); photoprints; maps, plans; printed matter.

Location:
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS - CONTACT REFERENCE
Call Number:
900203*
Holdings at This Location:
Box 5*

Location:
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS - CONTACT REFERENCE
Call Number:
900203
Holdings at This Location:
Boxes 1-4

extent2 lin. ft
formatsCorrespondence Business Papers
accessOpen for use by qualified researchers
record linkhttp://hdl.handle.net/10020/cat242985
record sourcehttp://library.getty.edu/vwebv/searchBasic
finding aidInventory available.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:06
....................................................................


titleIndictment, (no. 340) in the Court of Quarter Sessions, County of Allegheny, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, of September Sessions, 1892.
repositoryUniversity of Michigan Library UNIV OF MICHIGAN LIBR ANN ARBOR, MI 48109-1205 United States
collection titleIndictment of Alexander Berkman for assault on H. C. Frick, and of Carl Nold for inciting Berkman to commit the felony.

Plea and sentence noted on jacket.

Accompanied by related papers.

Found In:
Nold, Carl, 1869-1934. Papers, 1883-1934.

Notes:
Signed by Clerk of Courts.

Location
Special Collections Labadie Nold

extent[4] p. Typescript signed.
formatsTypescript
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies.
record sourcehttp://mirlyn.lib.umich.edu:80/F/?func=direct&doc_number=003922080&local_base=MIU01_PUB
updated11/12/2014 11:30:06
....................................................................


titleCorrespondence of Charles M. Schwab, 1891.
repositoryUniversity of Pittsburgh, Libraries
collection titleThis correspondence consists primarily of incoming letters and telegrams dated 1891 sent to Charles M. Schwab while he worked as general superintendent of the Edgar Thompson Steel Works and Furnaces in Braddock, Pa.

The letters include three typed, signed letters from Henry Clay Frick written during September 1891. J.G.A. Leishman, Vice Chairman and Treasurer of Carnegie Brothers & Co. Limited, and F.T.F. Lovejoy, Secretary of the firm, wrote several letters, mainly dealing with daily activities. The collection contains 20 letters and 5 telegrams received by Charles M. Schwab.

Bio/History:
Charles M. Schwab was born on April 18, 1862, in Williamsburg, Pa., and grew up in Loretto, Pa. In 1879, he began working for the Carnegie Co. as a stake-driver in engineering corps of Edgar Thompson Steel Works and Furnaces in Braddock, Pa. This plant formed part of Carnegie Brothers & Co., Limited. Schwab was frequently promoted while working at the Edgar Thompson Steel Works, and in 1886, Carnegie appointed him to the position of general superindentent at the Homestead works.

In 1889 Schwab became general superintendent of the Edgar Thompson Steel Works and later went on to become the president of Carnegie Steel Company, Limited. During the years 1901-3 Schwab was president of U.S. Steel Corporation, and bought Bethlehem Steel Corporation.
extent.35 cu. ft.
formatsCorrespondence
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies.
record sourcehttp://pittcat.pitt.edu/
finding aidAvailable in repository and on Internet
acquisition informationThe Charles Schwab Papers were purchased from Schoyer’s Books by Charles Aston, University of Pittsburgh’s Special Collections Dept., and then donated to AIS, 1994.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:06
....................................................................


titleJohn Powell Lenox collection, 1887-1924 (MssCol 3448)
repositoryNew York Public Library, Manuscripts and Archives Division
collection titleCollection consists of correspondence relating to Lenox's collection of pictures clipped from magazines, newspapers and other sources relating to the life of Christ.

Correspondents include Abraham Archibald Anderson, Otto Walter Beck, Edward A. Fellowes-Prynne, Henry Clay Frick, Edgar J. Goodspeed, Lord Ronald Gower, Walter Hampden, William S. Hart, Burton Holmes, Victor F. Lawson, Caleb Arnold Slade, Franklin Hamilton Spearman, Augustus Vincent Tack, Henry Van Dyke, and Payne Whitney.

Note
also known as Christ in Art Collection.

Note
John Powell Lenox (1851-1926) was an American lecturer and author.

LOCATION
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building- Manuscripts & Archives

CALL #
MssCol 3448
extent.2 linear foot (1 box)
formatsCorrespondence Clippings
accessRestricted Restricted access; Manuscripts and Archives Division; Permit must be requested at the division indicated.
record sourcehttp://catnyp.nypl.org/record=b3928911
updated11/12/2014 11:30:06
....................................................................


titleJames Moore Swank Papers, 1785-1898 (inclusive), 1785, 1871-1898 (bulk).
repositoryThe Historical Society of Pennsylvania
collection titleThere are also letters of an earlier period contributing information on political and economic trends; Hugh H. Brackenridge, 1808;

John Binns, 1812; Abner Lacock, draft of a letter, 1832, to President Andrew Jackson concerning the Seminole and Florida War, and revealing J. C. Calhoun's attitude toward Jackson in 1818; Henry C. Clay, 1849; John C. Breckinridge, 1860; James Monroe, 1822; deeds of John Penn, Jr., and John Penn, 1785, conveying land in Westmoreland County; and other items.

Correspondence of James M. Swank, secretary of the American Iron and Steel Association, with industrialists, political leaders, and others, relating to tariff and to the development of the iron industry in the United States. Among the correspondents are: George Bancroft, 1885; William Belknap, 1871; Simon Cameron, 1876; H. C. Carey, 1871; Andrew Carnegie, 1898; S. P. Chase, 1872; A. G. Curtin, 1878; John Dallzell, 1896; Hamilton Fish, 1871;

H. C. Frick, 1893; A. Gorman, 1894; Benjamin Harrison, 1888; Marcus A. Hanna, 1902; William McKinley, 1891; Justin S. Morrill, 1893; O. H. Platt, 1884; M. S. Quay, 1884; Samuel J. Randall, 1884; Carl Schurz, 1872; General W. T. Sherman, 1871; J. W. Forney, and others.


Call Number: (PHi)645
extentca. 250 items.
formatsCorrespondence Legal Papers
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies.
record sourcehttp://discover.hsp.org/
acquisition informationGift of Mrs. James Swank.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:06
....................................................................


titleGeorge Wingfield Papers, ca. 1900-1958.
repositoryNevada State Historical Society
collection titleCorrespondence and other materials relating to Wingfield and his activities in mining and banking. Includes records of companies run by Wingfield, including Getchell Mine Inc., Goldfield Consolidated Mines Company, Nevada Stock Farm Inc., Reno Securities Company, and numerous banks.

Correspondents include Bernard M. Baruch, Clarence F. Burton, Alfred Frankenthal, Henry Clay Frick, Herbert Hoover, Estey A. Julian, Pat McCarran, John Victor Mueller, Tasker L. Oddie, Key Pittman, M.L. Requa, and Fred Searls.

Notes:
Executive, of Reno, Nev.
extent151 linear ft.
formatsCorrespondence Business Papers
accessAccess restricted.
record sourcehttp://www.loc.gov/coll/nucmc/
updated11/12/2014 11:30:06
....................................................................


titleJames Hazen Hyde Papers, [ca. 1891-1941].
repositoryThe New-York Historical Society
collection titleCollection consists of correspondence, diaries, scrapbooks and other papers from 1891-1941 pertaining to his interest in Franco-American relations, e.g., Fédération de l'Alliance, Cercle Français de l'Université Harvard, American Field Service Fellowships, American lecture tours by French professors, his work in the American Red Cross in France during World War I, his social life, anecdotes and comments about prominent persons, especially in French government, military, and educational circles, personal affairs, etc.

Historical Note:
James Hazen Hyde (1876-1959) was a businessman, francophile, and expatriate. He graduated from Harvard in 1898. In 1899 he was left in charge of his father's (Henry Baldwin Hyde, 1834-1899) life insurance company, the Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States. In 1905 Hyde lost control of the company in a publicity scandal that resulted in an investigation of the insurance industry by the New York State. In late December 1905 Hyde sailed for Paris, where he lived until the Nazi occupation.

Location:
New York Historical Society Manuscripts Collection

Call Number:
Mss Collection Hyde
extentca. 35 linear ft. (22 boxes, 115 v.)..; Arranged alphabetically
formatsCorrespondence Diaries Scrapbooks
accessAccess: open to qualified researchers at The New-York Historical Society.
bibliographyLetters to Hyde from Henri Bergson have been published in their entirety in: Henri Bergson correspondances / Textes publiés et annotés par Andr/ACe Robinet..Paris : Presses Universitaires de France, 2002.
record sourcehttp://www.bobcat.nyu.edu
finding aidAlphabetical list of correspondents available in repository.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:06
....................................................................


titleVirginia Coal and Iron Company Records, 1880-1981.
repositoryHagley Museum and Library
collection titleForms part of the records of Penn Virginia Corporation.

The records of the Virginia Coal & Iron Co. give relatively complete coverage of its development and operations. The coverage of predecessor and subsidiary companies is more fragmentary.

The Connellsville Coke & Iron Company is represented by some correspondence of Superintendent John K. Taggart (c.1851-1896), mostly instructions from President E. B. Leisenring. Subjects of particular note include the strikes and labor troubles of 1886-88, production and marketing problems and some of the events leading up to the sale to Frick and Carnegie.

The Tinsalia Coal & Iron Company is represented by prospectuses and several letters of Gen. Imboden.

The records of the Virginia Coal & Iron Company are fragmentary up to 1910 and relatively complete thereafter. A small collection of correspondence covers the organizational period from 1896 to 1902, when VC&I was an operating coal company. The Virginia office files are complete from 1905 to about 1950 and represent the complete range of activities of an Appalachian land company. These include monitoring the activities of the mining lessees, inspecting the mines and negotiating changes in leases and royalties. Also represented are sales of timber, renting of farms and cabins and difficulties with timber poachers, undesirable tenants and moonshiners.

The Philadelphia office files are less complete for the early period, but continue into the 1970s. They cover primarily policy matters related to property ownership and diversification.

Records of the Virginia subsidiaries are fragmentary, but adequate coverage is available for the Interstate Railroad, the two water companies and the two oil and gas ventures. The records of Westmoreland, Inc., include land records, minute and account books and correspondence focusing on the acquisition and development of the West Virginia property.


Historical Note
The Virginia Coal & Iron Company was incorporated on January 6, 1882, and renamed Penn Virginia Corporation on April 19, 1967. VC&I was a typical large southern Appalachian coal and land company founded by members of the Leisenring, Wentz and Kemmerer families.

The Leisenrings were among several Pennsylvania anthracite operators who made the transition to bituminous coal. Their first such venture, and VC&I’s direct predecessor, was the Connellsville Coke & Iron Company, established in 1880 in the western Pennsylvania basin that then held a near-monopoly on the production of coking coal for the iron and steel industry.

The Virginia Coal & Iron Company acquired 70,000 acres of coal, iron ore, limestone and timber lands near Big Stone Gap by absorbing the property of the Tinsalia Coal & Iron Company (1880-1882). The Tinsalia Company had been established by entrepreneurs from the Connellsville Field of Pennsylvania on the representations of a local promoter, the ex-Confederate General John D. Imboden.

The formation of the Virginia Coal & Iron Company was part of a larger movement of northern capital and entreprenuers into the underdeveloped natural resource industries of the Appalachian South. Isolated land was purchased in large blocks at low prices from local or absentee proprietors. Locally-based land speculators like Imboden acted as willing middlemen. The northern capitalists financed the construction of railroads to open their properties to market, and the opening of each section was marked by land booms that drew in lesser entrepreneurs and speculators.

The Connellsville Coke & Iron Company had come into competition with Andrew Carnegie and Henry Clay Frick, and the Leisenrings were compelled to sell out to them in 1889. The capital and skilled personnel thus released were transferred to Virginia.

The railroads finally reached Big Stone Gap in 1890-91, giving access to the Northeast, Southeast and Midwest. The Virginia Coal & Iron Company opened its first mines and coke ovens at Stonega in 1896. It made a brief effort to develop the iron ore deposits in 1900, but they did not prove profitable.

In 1902, the operation of the mines was spun off to the Stonega Coke & Coal Company, controlled by Dr. John Shriver Wentz, who was also then president of VC&I. While operating as a lessee, it remained partially interlocked with the Virginia Coal & Iron Company.

From 1902 to 1966, the Virginia Coal & Iron Company was primarily a receiver of dividends, rents and royalties, the Virginia staff never exceeding ten people. The company leased portions of its lands to other coal operators, sold timber and operated sawmills and maintained a limestone quarry. Beginning in 1931, it organized several subsidiaries to explore for oil and gas. Between 1896 and 1961 it built and owned the Interstate Railroad to serve the mines of its lessees and insure an adequate supply of railroad cars. It also created the Clear Creek Water Company (1906-73) and the Cumberland Water Company (1918-77) to supply fresh water to the coal towns and the city of Appalachia. It organized the First National Bank of Appalachia in 1909 to secure adequate local banking facilities.

In the 1960s, the entire corporate structure was reorganized. In 1962, the Virginia Coal & Iron Company acquired 52% of the Westmoreland Coal Company’s stock, and a year later it absorbed Westmoreland’s land company, Westmoreland, Inc., which owned land in Westmoreland County, Pa., and Boone and Logan Counties, W. Va. The company also divested itself of its traditional Virginia subsidiaries between 1961 and 1977.

Location:
SODA HOUSE - Manuscripts & Archives

Call Number or Accession Number:
1764 (part)

extent117.3 linear ft.
formatsBusiness Papers Correspondence Financial Records Legal Papers
accessRecords closed for 25 years from date of creation.
record sourcehttp://38.115.62.80/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?DB=local&PAGE=First
finding aidUnpublished finding aid available in library.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:06
....................................................................


titleBethlehem Steel Corporation Records, 1714-1982.
repositoryHagley Museum and Library
collection titleThe records of the Bethlehem Steel Corporation are a series of fragments, lacking the complete runs of corporate and executive documents that normally comprise a business archive. The surviving records give a reasonable overview of the company’s history and activities, but one which is lacking in depth.

The largest part of the archive consists of design and construction drawings for vessels built at Bethlehem shipyards, particularly the Harlan Yard at Wilmington. Specifications and other constructions documents were also extensively collected, and there are ship lists and site plans for most of the yards. The company also prepared a master card file listing most of the vessels built by Bethlehem and collected copies of individual vessel histories prepared by the Navy.

The ship drawings are as yet only partially processed.

The largest textual series are two synthetic collections of vertical files and miscellaneous manuscripts produced by the company’s two in-house historical units, the Charles M. Schwab Memorial Library and the Archives.

These contain samples of company trade literature and brochures, newsclippings and tear sheets from the trade press covering Bethlehem’s history and products, as well as the life of Charles M. Schwab and other Bethlehem officials, and the company’s role in both world wars. Of particular note are two volumes of biographical notes on Schwab’s life, from interviews conducted by Sidney B. Whipple a few years before his death. The Archives and Schwab Library also collected non-company manuscripts on the early history of the iron and steel industries. Among items of note is a biographical memoir of Sidney Gilchrist Thomas.

There is at least fragmentary coverage of a few of the more important episodes in the company’s history. Surviving fragments of Schwab’s papers contain some information on the Carnegie Steel Company and the formation of U. S. Steel, as well as the controversy over the large bonuses paid to Bethlehem executives. The papers of vice president H. S. Snyder cover the project to build submarines for Britain during World War I and the acquisiton of ore mines in Cuba. The papers of vice president Archibald Johnston include reports on an aborted project to equip the Chinese Navy.

Management and technical procedures are described in plant general managers’ minutes (1918-22), superintendents’ training manuals, and reports on the practices of other American and foreign steelmakers. Bethlehem’s products are described in brochures, drawings, and engineers’ notebooks. Material on ordnance and armorplate includes a series of large wash drawings and illustrated test reports.

Although scarce, there are a few interesting pieces on labor issues. Committee reports contain some information on work processes, efficiency, and wage payment systems. There is also fragmentary information on company houses, company unions, welfare work, and safety campaigns.

Labor-related ephemera includes copies of work rules and union broadsides. The Schwab Library files include a series of menus from banquets at which Schwab was a speaker or guest.

The photographic portion of the archive is in some ways more comprehensive than the textual portion. It includes photographs of most of Bethlehem’s steel plants, Cuban and Mesabi Range ore mines, and some of its shipyards and coal mines. There are also numerous views of Bethlehem’s many products, including ordnance, naval and commercial vessels, bridges and buildings. The photographs are serviced by the Pictorial Collections Department.

History:
The Bethlehem Steel Corporation was the number two steel producer in the United States between 1916 and 1984. For a time it was also the largest shipbuilding firm in the world.

The Bethlehem Steel Corporation was incorporated in New Jersey on December 10, 1904, to effect the reorganization of the United States Shipbuilding Company of 1902. Bethlehem was a holding company whose purpose was to control the older Bethlehem Steel Company and a series of shipyards in Elizabeth, N.J., Wilmington, Del., and San Francisco, Calif.

The company was controlled by Charles M. Schwab until his death in 1939. In addition to steel ships, Bethlehem was a major producer of armor plate and ordnance and soon ranked on a par with Krupp, Armstrong’s and the other big European munitions makers. It also pioneered in structural steel, manufacturing the rolled wide-flange columns and beams invented by Henry Grey.

Bethlehem grew rapidly by absorbing competitors. Its principal acquisitions were the Fore River Shipbuilding Company (1913), the Pennsylvania and Maryland Steel Companies (1916), the Lackawanna Steel Company (1922), and the Midvale Steel & Ordnance Company (1923). A second round of acquisitions, including the Pacific Coast Steel Company (1930), the McClintic-Marshall Corporation (1931) and the Kalman Steel Company (1931), expanded Bethlehem’s reach into other areas of the country and strengthened its position in structural steel fabrication and as a supplier to the new manufacturers of consumer goods.

Like all domestic steel makers, Bethlehem was increasingly vulnerable to competition from non-union minimills and foreign producers, particularly after 1973. A drastic downsizing program between 1977 and 1990 temporarily eliminated massive annual losses. In the process, the company lost its number-two ranking, its fabrication and special product divisions, and its self-sufficiency in raw materials. Iron and steel production at the original Bethlehem site ceased in 1995, followed by the rolling mill in 1997 and the coke works in 1998. Bethlehem acquired the properties of Lukens Inc., a specialty plate manufacturer on May 29, 1998. With the end of the boom of the 1990s, Bethlehem filed for bankruptcy on October 15, 2002. The company’s remaining assets were sold to International Steel Group Inc. on May 7, 2003.

Location:
SODA HOUSE - Manuscripts & Archives

Call Number or Accession Number:
1699

extent200.5 linear ft.
formatsBusiness Papers Financial Records Legal Papers Research Files Ephemera
accessCopyright retained by Bethlehem Steel Corporation.
record sourcehttp://38.115.62.80/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?DB=local&PAGE=First
finding aidUnpublished finding aid available at the repository.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:06
....................................................................


titleResearch notes for Conquering Gotham, 2001-2006.
repositoryHagley Museum and Library
collection titleJill Jonnes’ research notes for Conquering Gotham consist almost entirely of photocopies of letters, reports, newspaper articles and extracts from books, most of which are highlighted or marked by the author. There are also some notes in the author’s hand, noting various research leads and things to do.

The photocopies are taken from mainstream newspapers and magazines, from scholarly monographs and memoirs, and from the business and personal papers of the main actors, especially A. J. Cassatt, Samuel Rea, Charles F. McKim, William H. Baldwin, James M. Forgie, and Henry Clay Frick. There are extensive extracts from the minutes of the Board of Engineers for the project. While the emphasis is on the technical and political problems faced in building the tunnels and station, there is also considerable background material on the lives and families of Cassatt and Rea in particular.


History:
Jill Jonnes is a freelance writer with a Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University who has published a number of books on technology and society. In 2007, she published Conquering Gotham, an account of the design and construction of the Pennsylvania Railroad’s New York Improvements, including the tunnels under the Hudson (North) and East Rivers and the original Pennsylvania Station in Manhattan.

This work was based upon extensive research in the company archives both at Hagley and the Pennsylvania State Archives, and in other collections of papers of the major figures in the story, including those of A. J. Cassatt, Charles F. McKim, Charles M. Jacobs, James Forgie, William H. Baldwin, Henry Clay Frick, and Theodore Roosevelt.

Location:
SODA HOUSE - Manuscripts & Archives

Call Number or Accession Number:
2404


extent3 linear ft.
formatsResearch Files Photocopies Manuscript
accessNo restrictions on use. Most materials are for reference use only. Copyright restrictions may apply.
record sourcehttp://38.115.62.80/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?DB=local&PAGE=First
finding aidUnpublished finding aid available at the repository.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:06
....................................................................


titlePapers of William J. Collins, 1902-1958.
repositorySterling and Francine Clark Art Institute
collection titleWilliam J. Collins was brought on as the first curator of prints and drawings in 1958. He had been the head, since 1939, of the Department of Prints at Knoedler & Co. in New York City, where the Clarks purchased many of their artworks. Collins passed away unexpectedly in 1960.

This collection consists of a number of different types of items. A three-ring binder documents sales of prints, drawings, and etchings to such major early-20th century collectors as Henry Clay Frick, Andrew W. Mellon, John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Joseph Widener, and Blanche Adler. Sales date back as early as 1902, so the binder probably belonged to Collins's predecessor at Knoedler's, Norman F. Wells, or perhaps even Wells's predecessor.

Collins kept a number of loose letters and ephemera stored inside its covers. There is also a small bound leather book divided into alphabetically tabbed sections. Most of the pages are blank, but some contain more lists in the same handwriting as the binder. They may also be prints and drawings bought or sold by Knoedler, but the annotations use abbreviations and numbers that are indecipherable.

An A-Z accordion file contained items relating to both the life and work of Collins, including a letter to his father composed after his brother was killed in battle during World War I; a letter from RSC, along with Collins's responses, regarding some prints RSC was hoping to buy; photographs of works Collins was buying or selling; ephemera relating to art shows; and other correspondence.

A black spring binder contains notebook pages with writing in pencil. There are passages that relate to the Bible and to art history. There is some translation from German. There is nothing conclusively identifying this object with Collins and its purpose remains unclear. The remaining items were found in Collins's room at the Williams Inn after he died. These include catalogs and other publications; several small oil paintings perhaps done by Collins; ephemera such as his credit card and Catholic holy cards; and additional correspondence and documents. One folder of materials is labeled James F. Drake, Inc. and contains correspondence between Collins and the rare book dealer regarding obtaining a number of art books for the Clark.

extent.8 linear ft.
formatsPhotographs Correspondence Ephemera Inventories Financial Records
accessContact the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute Library for further details.
record sourcehttp://cdm16245.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/
finding aidAvailable online and at the repository (Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute. Library).
acquisition informationThe binder and the book were acquisitioned in early 2007 after being removed from a collection of items that eventually made up the Realia and the Personal series of the Sterling and Francine Clark Papers. The A to Z file and personal items were accessioned in October 2007, along with records pertaining to the Prints and Drawings Collection.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:08
....................................................................


titleHenry Clay Frick Papers, Series V: Subject Files, 1848-1966, undated
repositoryThe Frick Collection and Frick Art Reference Library
collection titleHenry Clay Frick's Subject Files, 1848-1966 and undated, consist of correspondence, financial records, legal documents, notes, and printed material on a variety of topics relating to Frick's personal and business interests. These files were organized by Frick's office staff in Pittsburgh, and do not adhere to any chronological or alphabetical filing system. Instead, documents on a particular topic were gathered into an envelope, and envelopes were assigned sequential numbers. Four separate runs of numbers have been arranged in this series as the following four subseries: I: General Subject Files, II: Unfinished Matters, III: Finished Matters, and IV: Agreements. The last subseries among these papers, Subseries V: Bound Volumes, contains a handful of miscellaneous volumes used by Frick's office staff.

Subseries I: General Subject Files, 1848-1966 and undated, is the most voluminous of the materials in this series. These files largely concern real estate transactions, loans and financial assistance to family members, friends, and business associates, and investments in railroads, utilities, mining, banking, and manufacturing. Other topics of interest include Frick's private railroad car “Westmoreland,” the family's box at the Metropolitan Opera; social events hosted by the Frick family, and membership in a range of clubs, societies, and other organizations. These papers also document philanthropic endeavors and the lease of various properties, including the Vanderbilt mansion at 640 Fifth Avenue in New York, the Robert S. Bradley house in Prides Crossing, Mass., a vacation cottage in Palm Beach, Fla., apartments at Louis Sherry's in New York, and the charter of the steam yacht Shemara. An alphabetical index of topics and their corresponding envelope numbers is filed in the beginning of the subseries. Note that some gaps exist among the sequence of envelope numbers, and that some envelopes are empty, indicating that their contents may have been removed and stored elsewhere by Frick's office staff. The location of materials transferred out of these files is often unclear.

Subseries II: Unfinished Matters, 1903-1949 and undated, and Subseries III: Finished Matters, 1907-1921 and undated, appear to be two parts of the same sequence of numbered envelopes. As in the General Subject Files subseries, documents pertaining to a transaction or topic were assigned a numbered envelope. Notations were made on the envelopes concerning action taken and the existence of relevant documentation. Matters considered unresolved at the time of Frick's death were probably left in their envelopes, even though action may have been taken and recorded in the course of handling Frick's estate. For those matters considered resolved during Frick's lifetime, the envelope was stamped "Closed" and the contents of the envelopes were removed to another location as indicated on the envelope, with the empty envelope remaining in the file. Documentation from closed matters was transferred into the General Subject Files above (sometimes referred to in notes as the "regular file") or the Henry Clay Frick's Voucher Files, also in this repository (http://www.frick.org/archives/FindingAids/HCFVouchers.html). While the envelopes in the Unfinished Matters subseries are largely empty, they do contain detailed summaries of action taken and existing documentation, and can provide references to materials filed elsewhere among Frick's papers.

Subseries IV: Agreements, 1884-1925 and undated, pertain largely to real estate transactions and investments in in various companies. Exceptions to this include an agreement with F.J. Osterling for renovations at Clayton, and contracts for utilities at Clayton and the Frick Building. A bound record of agreements filed at the beginning of the subseries contains details such as the parties involved, pertinent dates (i.e. expiration, payment, renewal, cancellation, etc.), a synopsis, and the location of related documentation. As with the General Subject Files, Unfinished Matters, and Finished Matters, there are unexplained gaps in the sequence of numbered agreements in this subseries.

A small group of materials, Subseries V: Bound Volumes, 1911-1920s, contains an address book, an index to a file case, and an inventory of securities held in a safe deposit box.

Preferred Citation
Henry Clay Frick Papers, Series V: Subject Files. The Frick Collection/Frick Art Reference Library Archives.
extent34.3 Linear feet
formatsCorrespondence Financial Records Legal Papers Notes Printed Materials
accessThese records are open for research under the conditions of The Frick Collection/Frick Art Reference Library Archives access policy. Contact the Archives Department for further information at archives@frick.org
record linkhttp://www.frick.org/sites/default/files/FindingAids/HenryClayFrickSubjectFiles.html
record sourcehttp://arcade.nyarc.org:80/record=b1172607~S6
finding aidAvailable online and in repository.
acquisition informationOn deposit from the Helen Clay Frick Foundation, 2001.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:10
....................................................................


titleHenry Clay Frick Papers, Series III: Voucher Files, 1892-1929.
repositoryThe Frick Collection and Frick Art Reference Library
collection titleHenry Clay Frick's Voucher Files, 1892-1929, consist of accounts payable vouchers and memorandum vouchers documenting a wide variety of expenditures, including household goods and services, payroll, investments, donations and gifts, and travel. Together, these items give a clear and thorough picture of the Frick family's tastes and habits, as well as their daily activities and interests. Examples of some expenditures are cars, china, clothing, shoes, furniture, jewelry, books, entertainment, tuition, horses, carriages, gifts to family members and charitable organizations, doctors' fees and prescriptions, and expenses incurred in the staffing, maintenance, and improvement of the family's residences. Highlights of this series include a voucher for a Mercedes automobile purchased in 1909, with attached fabric swatches and paint samples (#9650); a voucher for $1,000 paid to cellist Pablo Casals for a private concert in 1915 (#5018), and five donations of $500 apiece made to Helen Keller over the period of 1911-1915 (#1578, 2565, 3469, 4190, and 4954).

Each voucher records when and to whom payment was made, the amount and nature of the expense, check number, and the account drawn upon for payment. Accounts payable vouchers were receipted by the payee at Frick's request, and are often accompanied by documents such as invoices, related correspondence, and canceled checks. Memorandum vouchers, on the other hand, appear to have been prepared for internal accounting purposes, were not receipted by the payee, and typically have few, if any, attachments.

Materials are arranged in three subseries: Subseries 1. Accounts Payable Vouchers - Group I, 1892-1919; Subseries 2. Accounts Payable Vouchers - Group II, 1912-1919; and Subseries III. Estate Vouchers, 1919-1929.

Subseries I contains a single run of more than 18,000 vouchers dating from the time the system was implemented in 1892 until Frick's death in late 1919. Vouchers are numbered sequentially, but start over at 1 after reaching 10,010 in 1909. Vouchers in Subseries I and III are indexed alphabetically by payee in eleven volumes, beginning in 1901. The original index covering the years 1892-1900 does not survive with these papers, but an electronic index for that period has been compiled. See the archives staff for more information.

Vouchers in Subseries II resemble those found in the first subseries, but comprise a second concurrent run of about 5,000 vouchers starting in 1912 and continuing until Frick's death. Expenditures documented in this subseries are very similar to those found in Subseries I, and were paid using the same bank accounts, so the purpose of the second run is not clear. Vouchers in Subseries II are indexed alphabetically by payee in two volumes, though these indexes appear to be less complete than the indexes found in Subseries I.

Subseries III, Estate Vouchers, date from Henry Clay Frick's death in until the settlement of his estate in 1929. This is the smallest of the three subseries, containing about 2,600 vouchers. Examples of expenditures in this subseries are legal fees, taxes, insurance, payroll, investments, continuations of gifts to family initiated during Frick's lifetime, and household and office expenses billable to the estate.

Related Materials
Vouchers for the construction of the Frick family's New York residence are filed in the One East 70th Street Papers. Documentation of expenditures prior to 1892 can be found in Henry Clay Frick's Invoice Books. Additional invoices are located in Henry Clay Frick's Receipts series

Preferred Citation
Henry Clay Frick Papers, Series III: Voucher Files. The Frick Collection/Frick Art Reference Library Archives.
extent39.4 linear feet
formatsCorrespondence Memoranda Notes Financial Records
accessThese records are open for research under the conditions of The Frick Collection/Frick Art Reference Library Archives access policy. Contact the Archives Department for further information at archives@frick.org
record linkhttp://www.frick.org/sites/default/files/FindingAids/HCFVouchers.html
record sourcehttp://arcade.nyarc.org:80/record=b922609~S6
finding aidAvailable online and in repository.
acquisition informationOn deposit from the Helen Clay Frick Foundation, 2001.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:10
....................................................................


titleGeorge Wingfield Papers. 1900-1958.
repositoryNevada State Historical Society
collection titleExecutive, of Reno, Nev. Correspondence and other materials relating to Wingfield and his activities in mining and banking.

Includes records of companies run by Wingfield, including Getchell Mine Inc., Goldfield Consolidated Mines Company, Nevada Stock Farm Inc., Reno Securities Company, and numerous banks. Correspondents include Bernard M. Baruch, Clarence F. Burton, Alfred Frankenthal, Henry Clay Frick, Herbert Hoover, Estey A. Julian, Pat McCarran, John Victor Mueller, Tasker L. Oddie, Key Pittman, M.L. Requa, and Fred Searls.

Notes:
Nevada Historical Society; (NC 1).
extent151 linear ft.
formatsBusiness Papers Correspondence
accessAccess restricted.
record sourcehttp://www.loc.gov/coll/nucmc/
updated11/12/2014 11:30:10
....................................................................


titleJames Moore Swank Papers, 1785-1898 (inclusive), 1785, 1871-1898 (bulk).
repositoryThe Historical Society of Pennsylvania
collection titleThere are also letters of an earlier period contributing information on political and economic trends; Hugh H. Brackenridge, 1808; John Binns, 1812; Abner Lacock, draft of a letter, 1832, to President Andrew Jackson concerning the Seminole and Florida War, and revealing J. C. Calhoun’s attitude toward Jackson in 1818; Henry C. Clay, 1849; John C. Breckinridge, 1860; James Monroe, 1822; deeds of John Penn, Jr., and John Penn, 1785, conveying land in Westmoreland County; and other items.

Correspondence of James M. Swank, secretary of the American Iron and Steel Association, with industrialists, political leaders, and others, relating to tariff and to the development of the iron industry in the United States. Among the correspondents are: George Bancroft, 1885; William Belknap, 1871; Simon Cameron, 1876; H. C. Carey, 1871; Andrew Carnegie, 1898; S. P. Chase, 1872; A. G. Curtin, 1878; John Dallzell, 1896; Hamilton Fish, 1871; H. C. Frick, 1893; A. Gorman, 1894; Benjamin Harrison, 1888; Marcus A. Hanna, 1902; William McKinley, 1891; Justin S. Morrill, 1893; O. H. Platt, 1884; M. S. Quay, 1884; Samuel J. Randall, 1884; Carl Schurz, 1872; General W. T. Sherman, 1871; J. W. Forney, and others.

Call Number: (PHi)645

Location: Closed Stacks (call slip needed)
extentca. 250 items.
formatsBusiness Papers Correspondence
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies.
record sourcehttp://discover.hsp.org/
updated11/12/2014 11:30:10
....................................................................


titleErskine Ramsay Papers, 1886-1953.
repositoryBirmingham Public Library
collection titleThe Erskine Ramsay Papers consist of correspondence, reports, speeches, newspaper clippings, photographs, blueprints, and maps documenting Ramsay's career in the mining and steel manufacturing industries in Birmingham, Ala. for the years 1886 to 1953. For the period of Ramsay's employment by the Tennessee Coal, Iron, and Railroad Company, 1887-1901, there is correspondence and reports which reflect the economic and managerial difficulties of the company and provide statistical data on its yearly production.

For the years 1902-1953, the Papers provide information on Ramsay's continued involvement in the mining and steel industries, his work with local charities, and his term of service as a member and later president of the Birmingham Board of Education, 1922-1941. Also included is a substantial amount of geneological information on the Ramsay family.

Bio/History
Mining engineer, inventor, business executive, philanthropist, and member and president of Birmingham, Ala. Board of Education.
extent4 linear ft. (5 boxes).
formatsBusiness Papers Correspondence Writings Photographs Drawings
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies.
record sourcehttp://www.bham.lib.al.us/
finding aidUnpublished inventory available in the library.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:10
....................................................................


titleJames Bonar Papers, 1886-1924
repositoryUniversity of Pittsburgh, Libraries
collection titleJames Bonar was a late nineteenth and early twentieth century Pittsburgh businessman born in Dunfermline, Scotland, the birthplace of Andrew Carnegie.

Bonar migrated to the United States where he was employed for a time by the Carnegie Steel Co. and later formed his own steam appliance company.

Bonar was also an artist and served for a number of years as president of the Associated Artists of Pittsburgh. This collection contains correspondence, scrapbooks, and photographs. Included in the correspondence are several letters to and from Andrew Carnegie and one from H.C. Frick.
extent0.31 linear feet (42 pieces, 1 folder, 2 scrapbooks)
formatsCorrespondence Scrapbooks Photographs
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies.
record sourcehttp://pittcat.pitt.edu/
updated11/12/2014 11:30:10
....................................................................


titleM. Knoedler & Co. records, approximately 1848-1971
repositoryThe Getty Research Institute
collection titleThe records of M. Knoedler & Co. document the business of the prominent American art dealer from the mid-19th century to 1971, when the Knoedler Gallery was acquired by Armand Hammer. The archive traces the development of the once provincial American art market into one of the world's leading art centers and the formation of the private art collections that would ultimately establish many of the nation's leading art museums, such as the Frick Collection and the National Gallery of Art.

It brings to the foreground the business side of dealing as artworks shuttled back and forth among Knoedler, fellow dealers, and collectors, documenting developments in art connoisseurship, shifting tastes, the changing role of art in American society, and the essential role of private collectors in the formation of public American art collections.

The records provide insight into broader economic, social and cultural histories and the nation's evolving sense of place in the world. The Knoedler Gallery became one of the main suppliers of old master and post-Impressionist paintings in the United States. Financial records of the firm provide crucial provenance information on the large number of artworks in American museums that were sold by the gallery. The archive includes stock books, sales books and commission books; correspondence with collectors, artists, art dealers and other associates; photographs of the artworks sold by the gallery; records from the firm's offices in London, Paris and other cities; exhibition files; framing and restoration records, and records of the firm's Print Department.

Selected portions of the archive have been digitized and made available online. Connect to selected digitized portions of the archive.

Arranged in 14 series:
Series I. Stock books;
Series II. Sales books;
Series III. Commission books;
Series IV. Inventory cards;
Series V. Receiving and shipping records;
Series VI. Correspondence;
Series VII. Photographs;
Series VIII. Exhibition files;
Series IX. American Department records;
Series X. Framing and restoration records;
Series XI. Print Department records;
Series XII. Other financial records;
Series XIII. Library cards, scrapbooks, and research materials;
Series XIV. Knoedler family papers


Biographical/Historical Note:
M. Knoedler & Co. was a successor to the New York branch of Goupil & Co., an extremely dynamic print-publishing house founded in Paris in 1827. Goupil's branches in London, Berlin, Brussels, and The Hague, as well as New York, expanded the firm's market in the sale of reproductive prints.

The firm's office in New York was established in 1848. In 1857, Michael Knoedler, an employee of Goupil and a manager for the firm, bought out the interests in the firm's New York branch, conducted the business under his own name, and diversified its activities to include the sale of paintings. Roland Knoedler, Michael's son, took over the firm in 1878 and with Charles Carstairs opened galleries in Paris and London.

In 1928, the management of the firm passed to Roland's nephew Charles Henschel, Carman Messmore, Charles Carstairs and Carstairs' son Carroll. In 1956 Henschel died, and E. Coe Kerr and Roland Balaÿ, Michael Knoedler's grandson, took over. In 1971 the firm was sold to businessman and collector Armand Hammer. The gallery closed in November 2011.

extent3042.6 linear feet (5550 boxes, 17 flat file folders).
formatsAuction Catalogs Business Records Correspondence Financial Records Ephemera
accessOpen for use by qualified researchers, with the following exceptions. Boxes 77, 262-264, 1308-1512, 1969-1974, 3592-3723 are restricted due to fragility. Box 4468 is restricted until 2075.
record linkhttp://hdl.handle.net/10020/cifa2012m54
record sourcehttp://primo.getty.edu/GRI:GETTY_ALMA21129976460001551
contact informationContact gallery's archivist
finding aidAt the Getty Research Institute and over their website.
acquisition informationAcquired in 2012.
updated05/29/2018 14:44:15
....................................................................


titleJacques Seligmann & Co. records, 1904-1978 (bulk 1913-1974)
repositoryArchives of American Art
collection titleThe records of art gallery Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., include extensive gallery correspondence files, reference files on American and European collectors and their collections, gallery inventory and stock records, financial records, exhibition files, auction files, and the records of subsidiary companies, including de Hauke & Co., (later Modern Paintings, Inc.), and Gersel Corporation (records for firms Tessa Corp. and Georges Haardt & Co. are not found). Included within the collection are Germain Seligman's personal correspondence, writings, and records relating to his private art collection. The records primarily document the gallery's business after becoming established in New York under the direction of Germain Seligman, but also include records of the Paris office, providing a comprehensive view of the activities and transactions of collectors and art dealers in the years leading up to and following World War II.

The largest series, Correspondence (80 ft.), includes general correspondence of Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., primarily when Germain Seligman directed the firm and the New York office. Correspondents include U.S. and European clients, artists, collectors, museums, dealers, galleries, shippers, U.S. and foreign government agents, bankers, and insurance firms.

Also found are personal correspondence of Germain Seligman; legal correspondence and other documentation concerning specific and general legal affairs (including attempts to recover Seligmann family and gallery artwork stolen in Paris during WWII); abstracts of letters sent; a small group of outgoing correspondence; correspondence of staff and agents Theresa D. Parker, Clyfford Trevor, and Rolf Hans Waegen; and inter-office memoranda.

Series 2, Collector's Files (35 linear ft.), document the firm's extensive system of tracking important clients and collectors in the art world. Files contain descriptions or artwork, sale prices, locations, and photographs of work owned by individuals as well as major American and European museums. Included in this series are files documenting the firm's involvement with the Duc d'Arenberg Collection, the Clarence H. Mackay Collection, Mortimer L. Schiff Collection, and the Prince of Liechtenstein Collection; and additional files and notebooks relating to collectors and collections.

Auction and Exhibition Files trace the sales and exhibition activities undertaken by the firm. Reference Files includes a card catalog to books and catalogs in the firm's library, and a photograph reference index to works.
Financial Files and Shipping Records consists primarily of records of the New York office, and includes purchase receipt files, credit notes, invoices, consignment invoices and books, invoices, consular invoices, sales and purchase account books, ledgers, and tax records.

The De Hauke & Co. Inc. records, 1925-1949, contain records of the firm's largest subsidiary. Included are correspondence, administrative and legal files, and financial records. The records of the firm established to incorporate most of de Hauke & Co.'s stock, Modern Paintings, Inc., include legal and financial files.

Germain Seligman's Personal Papers series includes scattered family and biographical material; research and writing files for his books, Roger de La Fresnaye, with a Catalogue Raisonne (1969), Merchants of Art, 1880-1960: Eighty Years of Professional Collecting (1961), The Drawings of Georges Seurat (1947), and Oh! Fickle Taste; or, Objectivity in Art (1952), and other writings and articles, including those co-authored with his wife, Ethlyne J. Seligman; documentation on his personal art collection, photographs of family members, and the Paris gallery.
extent203 linear ft.
formatsCorrespondence Financial Records Inventories Photographs Notes
accessUse of original papers requires an appointment
record linkhttps://www.aaa.si.edu/files/resources/finding-aids/pdf/jacqself.pdf
record sourcehttp://www.aaa.si.edu/collections/jacques-seligmann--co-records-9936
finding aidPublished finding aid available (279 p.): Finding Aid to the Records of Jacques Seligmann & Co., 1904-1978. Electronic finding aid available at http://www.aaa.si.edu/collections/findingaids/jacqselc.htm
acquisition informationDonated 1978-1979 by Mrs. Germain Seligman, daughter-in-law of Jacques Seligmann. Additional material was acquired in 1994 through the Estate of Mrs. Seligman. The Paris archives of Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., were destroyed by the Seligmann staff in 1940 to prevent them from falling into the hands of the Nazis.
updated07/20/2017 17:20:28
....................................................................


titleAn exhibition of paintings from the collection of Mr. Henry C. Frick [electronic resource].
repositoryFrick Art Reference Library and Brooklyn Museum
collection titleDigitized Catalog of a 1908 exhibition of paintings from the collection of Mr. Henry C. Frick held at the Union League Club (New York, NY).
extent1 online resource ([6] p.)
formatsElectronic Resource Exhibition Catalogs
accessNo restrictions on access copy. Unrestricted online access
record linkhttp://nyarc.org/digital_projects/gilded_age/31072002253625.pdf#view=Fit
record sourcehttp://arcade.nyarc.org:80/record=b1142591~S6
acquisition informationDocumenting the Gilded Age exhibition checklists and pamphlets digital project at Frick Art Reference Library and Brooklyn Museum
updated11/12/2014 11:30:14
....................................................................


titleOne East 70th Street Papers, 1907-1931
repositoryThe Frick Collection and Frick Art Reference Library
collection titleThese papers, dating from 1907-1931, chiefly document the construction and furnishing of Henry Clay Frick's New York residence at One East 70th Street. Materials include contracts, construction specifications, correspondence, architect's certificates, accounts payable vouchers, accounting and financial records, and inventories, as well as documentation of activities at the house after its construction, and maintenance and improvement of the property. These files do not contain blueprints of the house, or visual renderings (photographs, sketches, etc.) of any aspect of the design and construction process unless noted. For images of the house under construction, see the Wurts Brothers photographs in this repository.

The collection is arranged in eight series: I. Construction Contracts, II. Construction Notes and Correspondence, III. Construction Special Orders, IV. Construction Vouchers, V. Furnishings, VI. Financial Records, VII. Post-Construction and Estate Matters, and VIII. Daily Life.

Series I: Construction Contracts, 1912-1917, includes a bound index of contractors, lists of bids received, cumulative lists of contracts awarded, account summaries and trial balances, summaries of architect's certificates and bills on hand for payment, and files for each contract awarded. Contract files may contain correspondence, executed contracts, construction specifications, architect's certificates, and insurance and bond information. Correspondents include Thomas Hastings and his firm, Carrère & Hastings, construction superintendent D.B. Kinch, and the various contractors involved in the construction of the house. Contracts were issued for all aspects of the building process, from the wrecking and removal of the Lenox Library through the landscape surrounding the finished house. Multiple contracts were occasionally awarded to the same firm (e.g. Edward F. Caldwell & Co. and Cauldwell-Wingate Co.)

Series II: Construction Notes and Correspondence, 1912-1918, contains correspondence, notes, proposals, memoranda, estimates, auditor's reports, invoices, lists of subcontractors, and information regarding costs for labor, materials, insurance, and cartage. These materials document the progression of work at the construction site, as well as the billing, auditing, and payment of accounts. Construction expenses were closely monitored by auditors, and accounting discrepancies are frequently noted. Letters of Carrère & Hastings, superintendent D.B. Kinch, and Frick secretary F.W. McElroy appear throughout these files. This series also contains one letterpress copybook of Henry Clay Frick's outgoing letters during the construction and furnishing of One East 70th Street.

Series III: Construction Special Orders, 1913-1915, documents special orders for work not included among the general contracts in Series I. Folder contents typically include correspondence regarding proposals and acceptances, special order certificates issued by the architect, construction specifications, and itemized bills.

Series IV: Construction Vouchers, 1912-1914, consists of payment vouchers issued to firms, agencies, and individuals during the construction of the Frick residence at One East 70th Street. As was typical of Henry Clay Frick's accounting practices (see Henry Clay Frick Papers, Series III: Voucher Files for additional examples), vouchers were prepared and sent to the payee along with a check for the amount owed. These vouchers were receipted by the payee, and returned to Henry Clay Frick for his files as evidence of remittance received. Vouchers may have correspondence, invoices, or related documentation attached.

Series V: Furnishings, 1914-1924 and undated, contains lists of contracts and estimates, as well as letters, telegrams, notes, and invoices pertaining to the furnishing and decoration of One East 70th Street. As the principal decorators for the house, the files of White, Allom & Co. and Elsie de Wolfe comprise the bulk of this series. Their invoices and correspondence document the procurement of carpets, draperies, mantelpieces, furniture, wall coverings, light fixtures, and accessories for the house. Charles Allom's earliest letters discuss his plans for decorative treatment of various rooms, while later correspondence responds to Henry Clay Frick's frustration at work on the house that remained unfinished. Allom's files also document the changes to the Drawing Room after Frick's acquisition of the Fragonard panels in 1915. Elsie de Wolfe's letters detail the selection of antique pieces through various dealers in London and Paris. Other decorators, dealers, and contractors represented in this series include Duveen Brothers, through whom Frick purchased artwork and furnishings from the J.P. Morgan Collection, E.R. Bacon, who facilitated the purchase of a suite of Beauvais tapestry furniture from the Duke of Devonshire and supplied a set of antique silver wine coolers for the Dining Room, Maus, who overhauled the suite of tapestry furniture, and Gerald and Sydney Letts, who furnished the Bowling Alley and Billiard Room.

Additional material concerning the acquisition of objects from the Morgan Collection can be found in the Henry Clay Frick Papers, Series I: Art Files; the Eagle Rock Papers, Series: Furnishings; and the Henry Clay Frick Art Collection Files, all in this repository.

Series VI: Financial Records, 1907-1918, documents expenditures made during the construction and furnishing of One East 70th Street. Along with a summary of costs associated with the purchase of the property, this series contains canceled checks, monthly statements, and a check register from the Bankers Trust Co. special account established by Frick for the purpose of paying construction expenses. Also included in this series are a cash book, journal, ledger in which construction expenses were recorded by Frick's staff. For day-to-day expenses at One East 70th after construction was completed, see Series VIII: Daily Life.

Series VII, Post-Construction and Estate Matters, 1914-1924, contains inventories of the contents of One East 70th Street as well as Frick's garage property located at 129 West 51st Street. Inventories are grouped by type, namely collection property (i.e. items that would become part of The Frick Collection), estate property (items that became part of Frick's estate for distribution under the terms of his will), and personal property (items that were considered the personal property of Adelaide Frick and her daughter Helen). Additional materials in this series include specifications and contracts for the construction of the Frick Art Reference Library (referred to here as the 71st Street Extension), a file on the disposition of frames from the suite of Chatsworth furniture purchased in 1914, a file on the sculpture gallery proposed by Thomas Hastings but never constructed, a dispute with the city re: flagstones outside the residence, and documentation of a claim against W. & J. Sloane re: outstanding remittance for goods removed from the residence and sold.

The last series, Daily Life, 1914-1931, contains materials documenting the Frick family's activities and interests, along with household operations and expenditures. Of particular note are the household diaries, 1914-1919, which record guests to the house, luncheons, dinners and other entertainments, purchase and installation of paintings and other works of art, and comings and goings of family members. This series also contains notebooks with monthly compilations of household payroll and bills paid, summaries of dinners given at the house (e.g. guest lists, menus, music, etc.), inventories of books, wines, and liquors, and information about employees who served the Frick family at One East 70th Street, Eagle Rock, and other locations.

Biographical/Historical Note
Henry Clay Frick (1849-1919) was a prominent industrialist and art collector who made his fortune in the coal, coke, steel, and railroad industries. Born into modest circumstances in West Overton, Pa., Frick ended his formal education by the mid-1860s. In 1871, he borrowed money to purchase a share in a coking concern that would eventually become the H.C. Frick Coke Co. Over the next decade, he continued to expand his business through the acquisition of more coal lands and coke ovens, and entered into partnership with fellow industrialist Andrew Carnegie in 1882. Frick assumed the chairmanship of Carnegie Bros. & Co. (later Carnegie Steel Co.) in 1889, and served in that capacity until his resignation from the company in December 1899. During his tenure as chairman, differences between Frick and Carnegie emerged, most significantly in their approach to labor issues. The 1892 Homestead Strike further strained relations between the two men, and in 1899, Frick permanently severed his relationship with Carnegie.

In December 1881, Frick married Adelaide Howard Childs of Pittsburgh. The couple purchased a house ("Clayton") in the Homewood section of Pittsburgh, and had four children: Childs Frick (1883-1965), Martha Howard Frick (1885-1891), Helen Clay Frick (1888-1984), and Henry Clay Frick, Jr. (born 1892, died in infancy). After his break with Carnegie, Frick began spending less time in Pittsburgh, and soon established additional residences in New York and Massachusetts. In 1905, Frick leased the Vanderbilt mansion at 640 Fifth Avenue in New York, which he and his family would occupy for the next nine years. (For lease and other information about 640 Fifth Avenue, see Henry Clay Frick Papers, Series: Subject Files, File #242.)

"Eagle Rock", the Frick family's summer home in Prides Crossing, Mass., was completed the next year, in 1906. Also that year, Frick began to make plans for the construction of his own New York residence by purchasing land at the corner of 70th Street and Fifth Avenue. (For more information, see Henry Clay Frick Papers, Series: Subject Files, File #251). At the time of Frick's purchase, however, the Lenox Library was located on the site, and Frick was prevented from taking possession of the property until after the opening of the New York Public Library in 1911. While Frick did offer to relocate the Lenox Library building to another site at his expense, no agreement could be reached with the city, and it was demolished after he took title to the property in 1912.

Although Frick first sought designs from Daniel Burnham, architect of the Frick Building in downtown Pittsburgh, he ultimately commissioned architect Thomas Hastings of the firm Carrère & Hastings to design and build his New York residence. The result was a three-story Beaux-Arts mansion clad in limestone, and featuring a 100-foot picture gallery, a garden on the Fifth Avenue side of the house, and an interior courtyard. The site was cleared, plans for the house were finalized in 1912, and construction began in 1913. Charles Allom of White, Allom & Co. was selected to furnish the rooms on the ground floor, as well as the Breakfast Room and Frick's personal Sitting Room, both on the second floor. The remaining rooms on the second and third floors were decorated by Elsie de Wolfe, who was also commissioned to furnish the Ladies' Reception Room on the first floor (now the Boucher Room).

Frick, along with his wife and daughter, took up residence in the house in November 1914. (Frick's son, Childs, had married Frances Shoemaker Dixon in the fall of 1913, and consequently never resided in the house.) In 1915, two years after the death of J.P. Morgan, Frick had the opportunity to acquire objects from Morgan's famous collection, including paintings, bronzes, Chinese porcelains, and Limoges enamels. Through the art dealer Joseph Duveen, Frick acquired furniture, paintings, and decorative arts, including a series of Fragonard panels on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The house's first floor Drawing Room was then renovated to accommodate the panels.

With the exception of the Fragonard Room, the house remained essentially unchanged from the time of its construction until the death of Adelaide H.C. Frick in 1931. At that time, according to the terms of Frick's will, the house was converted into a museum, with architectural changes overseen by John Russell Pope. Expanded to include two new galleries, a Music Room, and a Garden Court, the museum opened to the public as The Frick Collection in 1935.

Preferred Citation
One East 70th Street Papers. The Frick Collection/Frick Art Reference Library Archives.

Related Materials
Additional materials regarding the furnishing of One East 70th Street can be found in the Henry Clay Frick Furnishings Files in this repository.
extent12.8 Linear feet (27 boxes)
formatsCorrespondence Financial Records Legal Papers Ephemera Letterbook
accessThese records are open for research under the conditions of The Frick Collection/Frick Art Reference Library Archives access policy. Contact the Archives Department for further information at archives@frick.org.
record linkhttp://www.frick.org/sites/default/files/FindingAids/OneEast70thStreetPapers.html#adminInfo
record sourcehttp://arcade.nyarc.org:80/record=b942392~S6
finding aidAvailable on the repository's website
acquisition informationPlaced on deposit by the Helen Clay Frick Foundation, 2001.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:16
....................................................................


titleHenry Clay Frick Papers, Series IV: Receipts, 1900-1926
repositoryThe Frick Collection and Frick Art Reference Library
collection titleThis series consists primarily of receipted invoices, 1900-1926, for personal and office expenses incurred by Henry Clay Frick, his family, and staff. The receipts encompass a range of goods and services, including groceries, clothing, transportation, medical expenses, club dues and charges, books and subscriptions, utilities, and payroll. These items document expenses at the Frick family's homes in Pittsburgh, Pa., and Prides Crossing, Mass., their residences at 640 Fifth Avenue and 1 East 70th Street in New York, N.Y., and some of the family's travels. Alterations and upkeep of these residences, as well as maintenance and improvement to their grounds are recorded. Expenses incurred after Frick's death in December 1919 were paid by his estate.

Goods and services documented here were procured through both businesses and individuals , and a brief description of the charge incurred is included with each entry in the finding aid below. Receipts are occasionally accompanied by correspondence, passbooks, or printed material, such as notices, brochures, and pamphlets. Folder contents may range from a single item to several folders of documents. Examples of some of the more voluminous files in this series are grocers (Acker, Merrall and Condit Co.; Childs, Sleeper and Co.; Clark Bros. and Co.; Edw. Treser Co.; Geo. M. Hofmann; John A. Renshaw and Co.; North Shore Fish Co.; and Rowley's Provision Co.), ice (Consolidated Ice Co.), shipping (Adams Express Co., American Express Co.), utilities (Allegheny Light Co. and People's Natural Gas Co.), telephone and telegraph services (New England Telephone and Telegraph Co., New York Telephone Co., Western Union Telegraph Co., Central District and Printing Telegraph Co., and Postal Telegraph-Cable Co.), stationers ( J.R. Weldin and Co. and Stevenson and Foster Co.), and payroll. While most receipts are filed under the service provider, certain employees in the Frick household kept their own accounts and submitted monthly expense summaries, filed here under the employee's surname. These include chauffeur George Despres, coachman James Elmore, gardeners David Fraser and George Wyness, butler Joseph Holroyd, engineer John Holroyd, and private rail car steward L. Perkins.

This series is not a complete record of all invoices paid by Henry Clay Frick's office and household. In fact, receipts in this series tend to be for smaller expenses, and appear to have been paid through the secretary's account in Frick's Pittsburgh office. Larger expenses were paid through the accounts payable voucher system (see: Henry Clay Frick Papers, Series III: Voucher Files, where additional receipts and invoices can be found).

Biographical Note

Henry Clay Frick was born in December 1849, in West Overton, Pa. One of six children, his parents were John W. Frick, a farmer, and Elizabeth Overholt Frick, the daughter of a whiskey distiller and flour merchant. Frick ended his formal education in his late teens, and began work as a clerk at an uncle's store in Mt. Pleasant, Pa. In 1871, Frick borrowed money to purchase a share in a coking concern that would eventually become the H.C. Frick Coke Co. Over the next decade, Frick expanded his business through the acquisition of more coal lands and coke ovens, and joined forces with fellow industrialist Andrew Carnegie in 1882. He assumed the chairmanship of Carnegie Bros. and Co. (later Carnegie Steel Co.) in 1889, and served in that capacity until his resignation from the company in December 1899.

In December 1881, Frick married Adelaide Howard Childs of Pittsburgh. The couple purchased a house, nicknamed Clayton, in the Homewood section of Pittsburgh, and had four children: Childs Frick (1883-1965), Martha Howard Frick (1885-1891), Helen Clay Frick (1888-1984), and Henry Clay Frick, Jr. (born 1892, died in infancy). After the turn of the century, Frick and his family began dividing their time between Pittsburgh, New York, and Massachusetts. In 1905, Frick leased the Vanderbilt mansion at 640 Fifth Avenue in New York. The family's summer residence, located on Boston's North Shore, was completed in 1906 and christened Eagle Rock. As early as 1907, Frick began planning for a New York residence of his own.

That year, he purchased a plot of land at the corner of Fifth Avenue and 70th Street, and in 1912, after the demolition of the Lenox Library formerly on the site, began building the beaux arts mansion which now houses The Frick Collection. Designed by Thomas Hastings of the firm Carrère and Hastings, the family moved into the house at One East Seventieth Street in the fall of 1914, and Henry Clay Frick died there five years later.

Preferred Citation
Henry Clay Frick Papers, Series IV: Receipts. The Frick Collection/Frick Art Reference Library Archives.
extent23.4 Linear feet ; 56 boxes
formatsCorrespondence Financial Records Ephemera
accessThese records are open for research under the conditions of The Frick Collection/Frick Art Reference Library Archives access policy. Contact the Archives Department for further information at archives@frick.org.
record linkhttp://www.frick.org/sites/default/files/FindingAids/HenryClayFrickReceipts.html
record sourcehttp://arcade.nyarc.org:80/record=b936315~S6
finding aidOnline and in the repository
acquisition informationOn deposit from the Helen Clay Frick Foundation, 2001.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:16
....................................................................


titleHenry Clay Frick Papers, Series VI: Accounts 1880-1942.
repositoryThe Frick Collection and Frick Art Reference Library
collection titleThis series contains ledgers, journals, account books, expense reports, payroll records, receipts, passbooks, checkbooks, canceled checks, and bank and brokerage statements documenting the personal finances of Henry Clay Frick from 1880 until his death in 1919. Items dated after Frick's death generally pertain to assets managed by his estate, although one volume does record transactions as late as 1942, long after the estate was settled. Papers in the Accounts series are divided into six subseries as follows:

Subseries I: Bound Volumes, 1880-1927. Chiefly composed of ledgers and journals detailing daily transactions from 1880 through 1919. Journals contain chronological entries of income and disbursements, while transactions in the ledgers are grouped into various accounts, with an index of account names at the front of each volume. Other volumes in this subseries include registers of securities, volumes recording interest accrual and dividends, and cash books.

Subseries II: Contingent Funds, 1902-1922. Contains expense reports, receipts, bank records, correspondence, and bound volumes documenting expenditures for staff, goods, and services at the Frick residences. These papers principally document expenses at the family's New York house and their summer home (known as Eagle Rock) in Prides Crossing, Mass. Contents may vary from one file to another, but may include a summary of expenses submitted by the chef, invoices for items procured for Frick's private railroad car, The Westmoreland, and receipts for expenses such as china, books, toiletries, bottled water, fresh fruit, prescriptions, temporary staff, dry cleaning, office supplies, trash removal, newspaper and magazine subscriptions, and telegrams. This subseries also documents the expenses of Georges Després, the longtime Frick family chauffeur, who managed garages for the Frick family both at Eagle Rock and in New York, and George Wyness, who was in charge of the gardens at Eagle Rock.

Subseries III: Payroll, 1902-1916. Contains both payroll books and loose payroll sheets. Payroll books primarily document household staff at Frick's summer house, Eagle Rock, in Prides Crossing, Mass., and at 640 Fifth Avenue in New York, which Frick leased from the Vanderbilt family from 1905 to 1914. Payroll sheets are not complete, but do give information about a wider range of employees than the payroll books in this subseries. Sheets list the employees in the house and gardens at Clayton; the house, gardens, and stable at Eagle Rock; the family's nearby farm in Hamilton, Mass.; 640 Fifth Avenue; the New York garage (located at 129 West 51st Street); 1 East 70th Street; Frick's office staff in Pittsburgh; the Faraday Coal & Coke Co. and St. Paul Coal Co.; and the Frick Building and Frick Building Annex in Pittsburgh. See Subseries III below for details about other sources of payroll information in the Henry Clay Frick Papers.

Subseries IV: Office Accounts, 1902-1942. Compiled by Henry Clay Frick's office staff in Pittsburgh, this subseries contains journals, cash books, petty cash checkbooks, and the cash book of an unidentified renting agent. In addition to documenting office expenses, many entries in the journals and cash books record amounts paid for household goods and services for Clayton, Eagle Rock, 640 Fifth Avenue, 1 East 70th Street, and Frick's private railroad car, The Westmoreland.

Subseries V: Investment Accounts, 1906-1925. Items in this subseries consist of daybooks, notes, lists, a record of locations where securities were deposited, recapitulations and trial balances, transaction and inventory sheets, brokerage statements, and correspondence regarding Frick's investment accounts. The subseries is divided into two groups: general files and those of specific investment accounts. General files concern the sale, purchase, and inventory of Frick's financial investments, while account files contain monthly statements, correspondence, and notes regarding numbered accounts at firms such as Charles D. Barney & Co. and Moore, Leonard & Lynch.

Subseries VI: Bank Records, 1891-1928. Consists primarily of bank statements, canceled checks, and checkbooks for Frick's personal accounts and agent accounts in New York; Pittsburgh; Salem, Mass.; and Beverly, Mass. This subseries also contains a small amount of correspondence regarding the accounts of F.W. McElroy, who managed Frick's accounts for many years before leaving his employment in 1915, and one folder of receipts from foreign transactions made while the Frick family was traveling abroad.

Preferred Citation
Henry Clay Frick Papers, Series VI: Accounts. The Frick Collection/Frick Art Reference Library Archives.
extent42.87 Linear feet (58 document cases, 143 bound volumes, and one oversize flat box)
formatsFinancial Records Journals
accessThese records are open for research under the conditions of The Frick Collection/Frick Art Reference Library Archives access policy. Contact the Archives Department for further information.
record linkhttp://www.frick.org/sites/default/files/FindingAids/HenryClayFrickAccounts.html
record sourcehttp://arcade.nyarc.org:80/record=b1271019~S6
finding aidOnline and in the repository
acquisition informationOn deposit from the Helen Clay Frick Foundation, 2001.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:16
....................................................................


titleHenry Clay Frick Papers, Series VIII: Letterpress Copybooks, 1881-1923.
repositoryThe Frick Collection and Frick Art Reference Library
collection titleItems in this series consist of letterpress copybooks containing Henry Clay Frick's outgoing correspondence. Volumes are arranged in three subseries: I. General Letterpress Copybooks, 1881-1919; II. Secretary's Letterpress Copybooks, 1892-1919; and III. Special Letterpress Copybooks, 1893-1923. Letters generally appear in chronological order within each copybook, and document business dealings, investments, art collecting, political activities, taxes, insurance, philanthropy, and personal matters.

They give insight into Frick's daily activities, interactions with colleagues and friends, political views, and manner of conducting business. Some correspondents represented in these volumes include Andrew Carnegie, Walton and E.M. Ferguson, Philander Chase Knox, Thomas Lynch, Jay C. Morse, W.R. Stirling, H. McK. Twombly, H. A. Gray, M.S. Quay, Charles S. Carstairs, M. Knoedler & Co., F.J. Osterling, and Daniel H. Burnham.

Subseries I: General Letterpress Copybooks, 1881-1919, is the most comprehensive of the three subseries. These 42 volumes contain a nearly complete run of letters composed by Frick over the period of 1881-1919. Correspondents are indexed alphabetically at the front of each volume. In most volumes, guide numbers noted at the top of each page indicate the page number of the previous and/or next letter addressed to the correspondent at hand. Additional copies of outgoing letters were sometimes filed alongside their incoming counterparts in the Henry Clay Frick Papers, Series II: Correspondence, but this was not done consistently by Frick's office staff, and generally only in later years.

Subseries II: Secretary's Letterpress Copybooks, 1892-1919, contains outgoing letters composed by the secretary in Henry Clay Frick's Pittsburgh office. Frick's New York secretary, Alice Braddell, either did not maintain a copybook for outgoing correspondence, or it does not survive with these papers. Letters contained in these volumes pertain chiefly to insurance, investments, property and tax matters, and bank transactions. An alphabetical index of correspondents can be found at the front of each volume. The earliest items in this subseries (Volumes 1 and 2) were compiled by George Megrew from 1892 to 1895. There is an unexplained gap in these volumes from 1895 to 1900. R.B. Caldwell served as secretary from 1900 until November 1902, after which the position was briefly held by C.H. Hicks. F.W. McElroy took charge of the copybook in December 1902, and served the longest of all of Frick's secretaries. He left Frick's employment in early 1915 and was replaced by C.F. Chubb. During Chubb's service, letters are occasionally signed by assistant secretary W.J. Naughton. The letterpress copybooks in this subseries terminate in early 1919, some months before Frick's death.

Subseries III: Special Letterpress Copybooks, 1893-1923, contains volumes designated for correspondence on specific topics, such as taxes, insurance, art, and the settlement of Henry Clay Frick's estate. The first volume in this subseries, "Financial Matters, etc.," contains routine correspondence on matters relating to taxes, club dues, promissory notes and mortgages, bills, stock and bonds, and insurance. Letters in the "Taxes and Insurance" volumes concern property taxes, water rents, and insurance policies and claims. Letters copied into the "Estate" volumes pertain to taxes, employees, bills paid, stocks, and rental properties, including the Frick Building, Frick Building Annex, and Union Arcade Building.

Special letterpress copybooks can also be found in other series among the Frick Family Papers, including an art letterpress copybook in Henry Clay Frick Papers, Series I: Art Files, and volumes pertaining to the construction and furnishing of Frick's residences in New York and Prides Crossing, Mass., in the One East 70th Street Papers and Eagle Rock Papers, respectively.

Preferred Citation
Henry Clay Frick Papers, Series VIII: Letterpress Copybooks. The Frick Collection/Frick Art Reference Library Archives.

extent32.4 Linear feet (70 volumes)
formatsBusiness Papers Personal Papers Correspondence Financial Records
accessThese records are open for research under the conditions of The Frick Collection/Frick Art Reference Library Archives access policy. Contact the Archives Department for further information.
record linkhttp://www.frick.org/sites/default/files/FindingAids/HenryClayFrickLetterpressCopybooks.html
record sourcehttp://arcade.nyarc.org:80/record=b1271021~S6
finding aidOnline and in the repository
acquisition informationOn deposit from the Helen Clay Frick Foundation, 2001.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:16
....................................................................


titleM. Knoedler & Co. records, approximately 1848-1971
repositoryThe Getty Research Institute
collection titleThe records of M. Knoedler & Co. document the business of the prominent American art dealer from the mid-19th century to 1971, when the Knoedler Gallery was acquired by Armand Hammer. The archive traces the development of the once provincial American art market into one of the world's leading art centers and the formation of the private art collections that would ultimately establish many of the nation's leading art museums, such as the Frick Collection and the National Gallery of Art.

It brings to the foreground the business side of dealing as artworks shuttled back and forth among Knoedler, fellow dealers, and collectors, documenting developments in art connoisseurship, shifting tastes, the changing role of art in American society, and the essential role of private collectors in the formation of public American art collections.

The records provide insight into broader economic, social and cultural histories and the nation's evolving sense of place in the world. The Knoedler Gallery became one of the main suppliers of old master and post-Impressionist paintings in the United States. Financial records of the firm provide crucial provenance information on the large number of artworks in American museums that were sold by the gallery. The archive includes stock books, sales books and commission books; correspondence with collectors, artists, art dealers and other associates; photographs of the artworks sold by the gallery; records from the firm's offices in London, Paris and other cities; exhibition files; framing and restoration records, and records of the firm's Print Department.

Selected portions of the archive have been digitized and made available online. Connect to selected digitized portions of the archive.

Arranged in 14 series:
Series I. Stock books;
Series II. Sales books;
Series III. Commission books;
Series IV. Inventory cards;
Series V. Receiving and shipping records;
Series VI. Correspondence;
Series VII. Photographs;
Series VIII. Exhibition files;
Series IX. American Department records;
Series X. Framing and restoration records;
Series XI. Print Department records;
Series XII. Other financial records;
Series XIII. Library cards, scrapbooks, and research materials;
Series XIV. Knoedler family papers


Biographical/Historical Note:
M. Knoedler & Co. was a successor to the New York branch of Goupil & Co., an extremely dynamic print-publishing house founded in Paris in 1827. Goupil's branches in London, Berlin, Brussels, and The Hague, as well as New York, expanded the firm's market in the sale of reproductive prints.

The firm's office in New York was established in 1848. In 1857, Michael Knoedler, an employee of Goupil and a manager for the firm, bought out the interests in the firm's New York branch, conducted the business under his own name, and diversified its activities to include the sale of paintings. Roland Knoedler, Michael's son, took over the firm in 1878 and with Charles Carstairs opened galleries in Paris and London.

In 1928, the management of the firm passed to Roland's nephew Charles Henschel, Carman Messmore, Charles Carstairs and Carstairs' son Carroll. In 1956 Henschel died, and E. Coe Kerr and Roland Balaÿ, Michael Knoedler's grandson, took over. In 1971 the firm was sold to businessman and collector Armand Hammer. The gallery closed in November 2011.

extent3042.6 linear feet (5550 boxes, 17 flat file folders).
formatsAuction Catalogs Business Records Correspondence Financial Records Ephemera
accessOpen for use by qualified researchers, with the following exceptions. Boxes 77, 262-264, 1308-1512, 1969-1974, 3592-3723 are restricted due to fragility. Box 4468 is restricted until 2075.
record linkhttp://hdl.handle.net/10020/cifa2012m54
record sourcehttp://primo.getty.edu/GRI:GETTY_ALMA21129976460001551
contact informationContact gallery's archivist
finding aidAt the Getty Research Institute and over their website.
acquisition informationAcquired in 2012.
updated05/29/2018 14:44:15
....................................................................


titleThe Papers of Roger Eliot Fry, 1873–1969.
repositoryKing's College Archive Centre, Cambridge
collection titleRoger Fry was born in Highgate, London in 1866. He was educated at St George's School, Ascot and Clifton College, and studied Natural Sciences at King's College between 1885 and 1889. He was elected to the Cambridge Apostles in 1887. In 1889 he attended Francis Bate's art school in Hammersmith.

Roger Fry became an expert on old Italian masters and French Post-Impressionist painters. He was Curator of the New York Metropolitan Museum between 1906 and 1910. On his return to England he put on two controversial exhibitions of modern French art. Fry opened the Omega workshops in 1913 to encourage young artists into interior decoration, and helped John Maynard Keynes to form the London Artists' Association in the 1920s.

Fry wrote several books about art and gave popular public lectures. In 1933 he became the Slade Professor at Cambridge University. His own paintings included portraits of friends in the Bloomsbury Group.

Roger Fry married Helen Coombe on 3 December 1896; they had two children, Pamela and Julian. Helen became mentally unstable and spent most of her life in a home. From 1920 Fry spent a large part of each year in Provence.

The collection includes lectures, correspondence, sketchbooks etc. accumulated by Fry during his lifetime. It also contains secondary material comprising correspondence, photocopies, notes and news cuttings assembled since Fry's death by his sister Margery, daughter Pamela Diamand, biographer Virginia Woolf, bibliographer Donald Laing and editor Denys Sutton.

The majority of Fry's papers were presented by his daughter, Pamela Diamand between 1976 and 1981.

The first listing was prepared in the late 1970s. A new catalogue was produced in 1995 which has separated records which may be considered Fry's own from those subsequently acquired.
extent34 boxes; paper, glass negatives and photographs
formatsWritings Slides Correspondence Diaries Photographs
accessopyright in the unpublished writings of Roger Fry is held by Mrs A. Cole. Please contact the Archivist for further information. Please cite as King's College Archive Centre, Cambridge, The Papers of Roger Eliot Fry, REF
record sourcehttp://janus.lib.cam.ac.uk/db/node.xsp?id=EAD%2FGBR%2F0272%2FPP%2FREF
finding aidCatalogue online and in repository.
updated02/16/2017 17:06:09
....................................................................