Archives Directory for the History of Collecting in America

Archives related to: Kuh, Katharine

titleKatharine Kuh papers, 1875-1994, bulk, 1930-1994.
repositoryArchives of American Art
collection titleThe papers of art historian, dealer, critic, and curator Katharine Kuh measure 12.1 linear feet and date from 1875-1994, with the bulk of the material dating from 1930-1994.

Found within the papers are biographical material; correspondence with family, friends and colleagues; personal business records; artwork by various artists; a travel journal; writings by Kuh and others; scrapbooks; printed material; photographs of Kuh and others; and audio recordings of Kuh's lectures and of Daniel Catton Rich reading poetry.

Biographical material consists of copies of Kuh's birth certificate, resumés, passports, award certificates, honorary diplomas, and address books listing information about several prominent artists and colleagues.

Four linear feet of correspondence offers excellent documentation of Kuh's interest in art history, her travels, her career at the Art Institute of Chicago, her work as a corporate art advisor, and as an author.

There are letters from her mother Olga Woolf, friends, and colleagues. There is extensive correspondence with various staff members of the Art Institute of Chicago, the First National Bank of Chicago, and The Saturday Review. Also of interest are letters from artists and collectors, several of whom became life-long friends including Walter and Louise Arensberg, Cosmo Campoli, Serge Chermayeff, Richard Cox, Worden Day, Claire Falkenstein, Fred Friendly, Leon Golub, Joseph Goto, David Hare, Denise Brown Hare, Jean Hélion, Ray Johnson, Gyorgy and Juliet Kepes, Len Lye, Wallace Putnam, Kurt Seligmann, Shelby Shackelford, Hedda Sterne, and Clyfford Still. Many letters are illustrated with original artwork in various media.

There are also scattered letters from various artists and other prominent individuals including Josef Albers, George Biddle, Marcel Breuer, Joseph Cornell, Stuart Davis, Edwin Dickinson, Joseph Hirshhorn, Daniel Catton Rich, and Dorothea Tanning.

Personal business records include a list of artwork, Olga Woolf's will, inventories of Kuh's personal art collection, miscellaneous contracts and deeds of gift, receipts for the sale of artwork, files concerning business-related travel, and miscellaneous receipts.

Artwork in the collection represents a wide range of artist friends and media, such as drawings, watercolors, paintings, collages, and prints. Included are works by various artists including lithographs by David Hare and a watercolor set, Technics and Creativity, designed and autographed by Jasper Johns for the Museum of Modern Art, 1970.

Notes and writings include annotated engagement calendars, travel journals for Germany, a guest book for the Kuh Memorial gathering, and many writings and notes by Kuh for lectures and articles concerning art history topics.

Of interest are minutes/notes from meetings for art festivals, conferences, and the "Conversations with Artists Program (1961). Also found are writings by others about Kuh and other art history topics.
Six scrapbooks contain clippings that document the height of Kuh's career as a gallery director and museum curator. Scrapbook 6 contains clippings about Fernand Léger, the subject of a retrospective exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago in 1953.

Additional printed material includes clippings about Kuh and her interests, a comprehensive collection of clippings of Kuh's articles for The Saturday Review, exhibition announcements and catalogs, calendars of events, programs, brochures, books including Poems by Kuh as a child, and reproductions of artwork.

Of particular interest are the early and exhibition catalogs from the Katharine Kuh Gallery, and rare catalogs for artists including Jean Arp, Alexander Calder, Marc Chagall, Jean Dubuffet, Marcel Duchamp, Stanley William Hayter, Hans Hofmann, Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, Franz Kline, Le Corbusier, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, and Pablo Picasso.

Photographs provide important documentation of the life and career of Katharine Kuh and are of Kuh, family members, friends, colleagues, events, residences, and artwork. Several of the photographs of Kuh were taken by Will Barnet and Marcel Breuer and there is a notable pair of photo booth portraits of Kuh and a young Ansel Adams.

There are also group photographs showing Angelica Archipenko with Kuh; designer Klaus Grabe; painters José Chavez Morado and Pablo O'Higgins in San Miguel, Mexico; Kuh at the Venice Biennale with friends and colleagues including Peggy Guggenheim, Frances Perkins, Daniel Catton Rich, and Harry Winston; and "The Pre-Depressionists" including Lorser Feitelson, Robert Inverarity, Helen Lundeberg, Arthur Millier, Myron Chester Nutting, and Muriel Tyler Nutting.

Photographs of exhibition installations and openings include views of the Katharine Kuh Gallery; Fernand Léger, Man Ray, and László Moholy-Nagy at the Art Institute of Chicago; and Philip Guston, Jimmy Ernst, Seymour H. Knox, Franz Kline, Robert Motherwell, and Mark Rothko at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York. There are also photographs depicting three men posing as Léger's "Three Musicians" and the visit of Queen Elizabeth II to the Art Institute of Chicago. There is a photograph by Peter Pollack of an elk skull used as a model by Georgia O'Keeffe.

Additional photographs of friends and colleagues include Ivan Albright, Alfred Barr, Alexander Calder, Marc Chagall, Willem De Kooning, Edwin Dickinson, Marcel Duchamp, Claire Falkenstein, Alberto Giacometti, poet Robert Graves with Len Lye, Philip Johnson, Gyorgy and Juliet Kepes, Carlos Mérida, José Orozco, Hasan Ozbekhan, Pablo Picasso, Carl Sandberg, Ben Shahn, Otto Spaeth, Hedda Sterne, Adlai Stevenson, Clyfford Still, Mark Tobey, and composer Victor Young.

Photographs of artwork include totem poles in Alaska; work by various artists including Claire Falkenstein, Paul Klee, and Hedda Sterne; and work donated to the Guggenheim Museum.

Four audio recordings on cassette are of Katharine Kuh's lectures, including one about assembling corporate collections, and of Daniel Catton Rich reading his own poetry. There is also a recording of the Second Annual Dialogue between Broadcasters and Museum Educators.

Bio / His Notes:
Katharine Kuh (1904-1994) was an art consultant, curator, and critic working in Chicago and New York City.

Additional forms:
Portions of this collection are available on 35mm microfilm reels 265, 267, 2225-2227, and 2288 at Archives of American Art offices, and through interlibrary loan. Researchers should note that the arrangement of the collection as described in this finding aid may not reflect the order of the collection on microfilm.

Cite as:
Katharine Kuh papers, 1875-1994, bulk 1930-1994. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
extent12.1 linear ft
formatsBusiness Papers Personal Papers Correspondence Clippings Works of Art
accessUse of original papers requires an appointment. Entire collection (excluding art work from Art Institute of Chicago): Authorization to publish, quote, or reproduce requires permission; obtain additional information from AAA Reference staff.
record linkhttp://www.aaa.si.edu/collections/katharine-kuh-papers-9951/more
record sourcehttp://www.siris.si.edu/
finding aidonline and in repository
acquisition informationDonated 1971-1994 by Katharine Kuh and the Katharine Kuh estate. In addition, 147 works of art determined to have been made expressly for Kuh, or dedicated to her, were donated 1995 by the Art Institute of Chicago, which had received them from the Kuh estate along with other works of art in Kuh's collection. Loc. of Assoc. Material: Additional Katharine Kuh papers also located at: Yale University.
updated09/12/2019 15:28:57
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titleOral history interview with Katharine Kuh, 1982 Mar. 18-1983 Mar. 24.
repositoryArchives of American Art
collection titleAn interview of Katharine Kuh conducted by Avis Berman for the Archives of American Art's Mark Rothko and His Times oral history project.

TAPE 1: Kuh speaks of her invalid childhood in Chicago, the development of her interest in art, classes in art history at Vassar College, and her career as curator of modern art at the Art Institute of Chicago. She recalls in particular the "Sanity in Art" movement against modern art in Chicago. Kuh describes her relationship with Mark Rothko and Rothko's relationships with Mark Tobey, Clyfford Still, Kate Rothko, Theodoros Stamos, Milton Avery, Stanley Kunitz, and Hans Hofmann.

TAPE 2: Kuh discusses her parents, the family silk business, travelling in Europe as a child, life in Chicago, the effects of polio and other illnesses on her interests, and her student years at Vassar College. She remembers visiting Bernard Berenson in Italy with her family and again with Daniel Catton Rich, with whom she worked very closely at the Art Institute of Chicago. She speaks of the Katharine Kuh Gallery, which she started in the mid-1930s and its place in the vanguard of the Chicago art scene.

TAPE 3: Kuh remembers the effects of the stock market crash on her personal situation, her marriage to businessman George Kuh, distaste for life in the suburbs, and her divorce. She discusses the Katharine Kuh Gallery and the actions taken against her business by members of the reactionary "Sanity in Art" movement (including a very funny anecdote concerning Carlos Merida). She speaks of the classes in modern art that she taught at her gallery and of some of the artists she exhibited there, including the photographers Ansel Adams, Alfred Stieglitz, and Edward Weston.

TAPE 4: Kuh remembers the McCarthy era and the political conservatism in Chicago, including her testimony on behalf of Bill Zimmerman, Acting Commissioner of Indian Affairs. She criticizes blockbuster exhibitions and the changes in the role of a museum curator. She reminisces about building the collection at the Art Institute of Chicago and the art education program she ran there, and recalls Stuart Davis, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Gyorgy Kepes, and Ivan Albright.

TAPE 5: Kuh remembers Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, and Marcel Duchamp, as well as the collectors Walter Paepcke and Walter and Louise Arensberg (whose collection she surveyed in their home for an exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago).

TAPE 6: Kuh focuses on her memories of Mark Rothko, recalling when they met, their friendship, his manner of working, his feelings about his work, and his worries towards the end of his life. She talks about Clyfford Still, Barnett Newman, and Mark Tobey. Some parts of this tape repeat what she said earlier.

TAPES 7 and 8: Kuh continues discussing Rothko, particularly his Houston chapel murals and the retrospective exhibition at MOMA in 1961. She remembers visiting Rothko's studio and describes his working methods. She relates Rothko's views on other artists, including Milton Avery, Clyfford Still, Turner, Robert Motherwell, and Adolf Gottlieb; parts repeat things said before. Kuh also discusses Rothko's wife and daughter.
TAPE 9: Kuh recounts building the collection at the Art Institute of Chicago and speaks of the museum staff, trustees, and donors. She remembers Alfred Barr at MOMA.

TAPE 10: Kuh continues speaking about the Art Institute of Chicago, describing the circumstances of her resignation and subsequent move to New York. She talks of knowing Peggy Guggenheim, Max Ernst, and Fernand Leger.

TAPE 11: Kuh describes her work as a consultant to college museums and her writings. She discusses the field of art criticism and her career as art editor at Saturday Review. She recalls Clyfford Still's retrospective exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and his death.

TAPE 12: Kuh describes her work as a collector for the First National Bank of Chicago.

TAPE 13: Kuh recounts more about her work at Saturday Review and her resignation. She goes into great detail about her travels in Alaska and British Columbia surveying Northwest Indian art for a government report. She speaks again about the McCarthy era.

TAPE 14: Kuh speaks again about the Katharine Kuh Gallery and the artists she exhibited there, including Josef Albers (and his Black Mountain College), Alexander Archipenko, Stuart Davis, Paul Klee, Alexander Calder, and Man Ray.

TAPE 15: Kuh continues her discussion of artists she exhibited at the Katharine Kuh Gallery, including Mark Tobey, Paul Klee, and Isamu Noguchi.

TAPE 16: Kuh continues talking about artists she exhibited at the Katharine Kuh Gallery, including David Smith, Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Eliot Porter, Rufino Tamayo, and Jack Tworkov.
extentSound recording: 16 cassettes : analog. Transcript: 313 p. (on partial microfilm reel) reel 4937
formatsInterview Transcript Sound Recording
accessTranscript: Patrons must use microfilm copy. Authorization to publish more than 500 words requires written permission. Contact AAA Reference staff for information.
record sourcehttp://www.siris.si.edu/
acquisition informationThis interview was conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's Mark Rothko and his Times oral history project, with funding provided by the Mark Rothko Foundation. Others interviewed on the project (by various interviewers) include: Sonia Allen, Sally Avery, Ben-Zion, Bernard Braddon, Ernest Briggs, Rhys Caparn, Elaine de Kooning, Herbert Ferber, Esther Gottlieb, Juliette Hays, Sidney Janis, Buffie Johnson, Jacob Kainen, Louis Kaufman, Jack Kufeld, Stanley Kunitz, Joseph Liss, Dorothy Miller, Betty Parsons, Wallace Putnam, Rebecca Reis, Maurice Roth, Sidney Schectman, Aaron Siskind, Joseph Solman, Hedda Sterne, Jack Tworkov, Esteban Vicente and Ed Weinstein. Each has been cataloged separately.
updated11/12/2014 11:29:48
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titleKatharine Kuh papers, 1937-1964 (inclusive)
repositoryYale University Library
collection titleThe papers contain correspondence and art on greeting cards by artists whose works she exhibited.

Biographical/Historical note:
Katharine Kuh, art historian, art curator, and author.

Location: BEINECKE (Non-Circulating)
Call Number: YCAL MSS 15
extent0.75 linear ft. (2 boxes)
formatsCorrespondence Ephemera
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies.
record linkhttp://hdl.handle.net/10079/fa/beinecke.kuh
record sourcehttp://search.library.yale.edu/catalog/3249744
finding aidOnline and unpublished finding aid in repository.
acquisition informationGift of Katharine Kuh, 1964.
updated12/07/2018 10:54:59
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titleEdward and Rosamond Walling Tirana Corbett papers, 1932-1978.
repositoryArchives of American Art
collection titleBiographical information, correspondence, scrapbooks, writings, artwork and art-related information, photographic materials, school records, financial materials, miscellaneous items, and printed materials. Also included are papers of Rosamond Corbett's husband, economist Rifat Tirana (3 ft.).

Notes:
Painters; California, New Mexico, Massachusetts and Washington, D.C. Edward Corbett died in 1971. He was an early Abstract Expressionist. Married Rosamond Tirana in 1962. Rosamund Tirana was married to Rifat Tirana (d. 1952). Died June 27, 1999.
extent7.0 linear ft. (partially microfilmed on 7 reels)
formatsMicrofilm Correspondence Scrapbooks Writings Artwork
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies.
record sourcehttp://www.siris.si.edu/
acquisition informationDonated 1983 by Mrs. Rosamond Tirana Corbett.
updated11/12/2014 11:29:57
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titleAvis Berman research material on Katharine Kuh, 1939-2006.
repositoryArchives of American Art
collection titleHandwritten drafts, typed manuscripts, artists files, interviews, correspondence, notes, press releases, articles, clippings, reviews, exhibition data, and miscellaneous memorabilia written by Kuh and compiled by Berman in preperation for Kuh's memoir "My Love Affair with Modern Art: Behind the Scenes with a Legendary Curator". Artists files include Joseph Albers, Hans Hofmann, Alfred Jensen, Mies van der Rohe, Mark Rothko, Clyfford Still, and Mark Tobey.

Bio / His Notes:
Art historian; New York, N.Y. Berman is Katharine Kuh's executor. Kuh opened her own gallery in Chicago in the 1930s representing a variety of now well known artists. She is considered a pioneer for women in the field of art.
extent4.0 linear ft.
formatsWritings Notes Transcript Interviews Correspondence
accessUse requires an appointment. Authorization to quote or reproduce for the purposes of publication requires written permission - see repository.
record sourcehttp://www.siris.si.edu/
acquisition informationDonated 2007 by Avis Berman.
updated11/12/2014 11:29:57
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titleNew directions in American painting and sculpture, 1960 Apr. 13.
repositoryArchives of American Art
collection titleA panel discussion "New Directions in American Painting and Sculpture," sponsored by the Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors. Panel members are John Canaday, Albert Christ-Janer, Hubert Crehan, and Katharine Kuh, with Henry Botkin as moderator.

Bio / His Notes:
Art organization; New York, N.Y.
extent2 sound tapes ; 7 in. (45 p. transcript)
formatsSound Recording Transcript
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies.
record sourcehttp://www.siris.si.edu/
acquisition informationDonated by Will Barnet.
updated11/12/2014 11:29:57
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titleRobert Jay Wolff papers, 1926-1969.
repositoryArchives of American Art
collection titleCorrespondence; printed materials; art works and miscellaneous papers.

REELS D302-D302a: Correspondence, some dating from Hiler's years in Paris in the 1920s; autobiographical and biographical material; published articles by Hiler, "Costumes and Ideologies," "Some Associative Aspects of Color," "Structuralism," "The Search for a Method of Graphic Expression," and "The Origin and Development of Structural Design;" the book Why Abstract, co-authored by him; exhibition catalogs; magazine articles on and about him; and miscellaneous papers. Some material on D302 has been duplicated on reel D302a.

Correspondents include: Faber Birren, Kay Boyle, Marc Connelly, Caresse Crosby, Nancy Cunard (11 items), Ben Cunningham (to Hiler's daughter), John Ferren, Al Hirschfeld, Carl Holty (5 items, up to 14 p. each), Robert Bruce Inverarity, Gyorgy Kepes, Katharine Kuh, Rico Lebrun, Fernand Leger, Albert W. Levi, Paul Mathews, Henry Miller, Abraham Rattner, Man Ray, Ad Reinhardt, Meyer Schapiro, Charles P. Snow, Edgar Varese, Herbert G. Wells, and William Carlos Williams.

In the 5 Holty letters, up to 14 p. each, Holty comments on aesthetics, color theory, the work of Abraham Rattner, Holty's painting, the history of modern art after WWII, and his trip across America with Henry Miller and Rattner.

REELS 611-614: Personal and business correspondence, bills and receipts, certificates, licenses, membership cards; 2 sketchbooks, and 17 loose sketches, many with notes and instructions; 3 notebooks, containing miscellaneous writings, clippings and sketches; 37 illustrations and diagrams, possibly for a book; 119 miscellaneous items relating to color and design; articles and short stories; writings on structuralism, including a copy of the typescript for COLOR AND DESIGN: A STRUCTURALIST APPROACH; a typed draft of Hiler's autobiography (292 p.); 14 exhibition catalogs and announcements; 20 clippings, and printed material; and miscellaneous papers.

Correspondents include America's Artists in Particular (organization), O'Brien Boldt, Kay Boyle, Ben Cunningham, Jerome Flax, the Foundation for Intergrated Education, Jay H. Herz, Gyorgy Kepes, Charles Lavell, Jim Moran, Henry Schnakenberg, and George Wittenborn.

Bio / His Notes:
Mural painter, designer, decorator, writer; New York, N.Y. and Paris.
extent4.2 linear ft. (on 5 microfilm reels).
formatsMicrofilm
accessPatrons must use microfilm copy.
record sourcehttp://www.siris.si.edu/
acquisition informationMost of Hiler's personal correspondence with artists was lost during a move, when it was discarded by movers.
updated11/12/2014 11:29:57
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titleLee Gatch papers, 1925-1979.
repositoryArchives of American Art
collection titleCorrespondence, notebooks, writings, photographs, catalogs and other publications.

REEL D160: Letters from Gatch's dealer J.B. Neumann, detailing his financial difficulties, Marian Willard of Willard Gallery, collector Duncan Phillips, who discusses a catalog he is writing on Gatch, and painter and collector Max Kahn; photographs of Gatch, ca. 1934; a commonplace book, 1925-1937, which also includes food recipes and an inventory of Gatch's paintings; clippings; and catalogs.

REEL NLG-1: Mainly correspondence with Phillip Bruno of World House Galleries concerning the pricing and delivery of paintings. Gatch comments specifically on "Veronica's Veil" and "Gothic Night." Also included are social notes from Elsie Driggs Gatch to Josephine Bruno, playbills from performances of Merriman Gatch, clippings, and photographs.

REEL N69-137: an autobiographical sketch; letters, 1934-1965, from Lewis Mumford, Katharine Kuh, and others, commending his work, from J.B. Neumann and Duncan Phillips, discussing sales of his painting, and from Max Kahn, commenting generally on art matters; brief essays by Gatch on his paintings "Jurassic Frieze" and "World's End," and the development of his painting; a book of poems inscribed by the author, Power Dalton; and catalogs.

REEL 1: Letters to Elsie Driggs, 1934-1935, commenting on his art theories, his plans for Yaddo, and his financial situation; an exchange between Gatch and Bruno, commenting on his use of texture; one letter from Duncan Phillips, discussing an article he is preparing on Gatch. Also, a typescript comment by Gatch on the aim of his art, a certificate from the New York Institute of Mechanics, 1941, and a National Institute of Arts and Letters citation, 1965.

REEL 2812: 36 photographs of Gatch, his homes, and studios, ca. 1927-1963; 3 exhibition catalogs; and a letter, February 8, 1979, from Robert J. Koenig to Merriman Gatch regarding "The Acrobats" by her father.

UNMICROFILMED: Photographs, printed material, several letters, a student notebook, and memorabilia.

Bio / His Notes:
Painter; New York, N.Y.
extent 1.0 linear ft. (partially microfilmed on 5 reels)
formatsMicrofilm Correspondence Notebooks Writings Photographs
accessContact repository for restrictions and policies.
record sourcehttp://www.siris.si.edu/
acquisition informationDonated 1963-1979 by Gatch and his wife Elsie Driggs Gatch, except for material on reel NLG-1, which was lent for microfilming, as well as portions of the unmicrofilmed material, which were donated 1971 by Mrs. Leonard Strauss (6 snapshots), who was working on a master's thesis on Gatch, and by Gatch's sister, Sister Mary Rachel Gatch (2 letters, and printed material).
updated11/12/2014 11:29:57
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titleLily Harmon papers, 1930-1996.
repositoryArchives of American Art
collection titlePrimarily research files and notes, subject files, interview tapes and transcripts, correspondence, writings, and other materials compiled by Harmon for a never-published biography of art dealer J.B. Neumann, titled The Art Lover.

Found are photocopies of J.B. Neuman's correspondence with Karl Nierendorf, Clifford Odets, Elsa Schmid, and Alfred Stieglitz; photocopies and other materials from the J.B. Neumann Collection at the University of Texas at Austin, Harry Ransom Humanities Center, including photocopies of the magazine published by Neumann titled Art Lover Library, 1930-1957 (volume 1, 1930 is original bound volume), copyprints and photocopies of photographs of Neumann, his family, and of other subjects; interview transcripts and audio tapes with numerous artists conducted in the mid-1980s; research notes and files; and subject files on numerous artists (all photocopies).

Harmon's personal papers include resumes; copies of letters from friends, family, dealers and others; photographs of Harmon's paintings; writings, including poems, excerpts from diaries, autobiographical essays, and her autobiography FREEHAND; photocopies of various mss. drafts of Harmon's biography of Neumann, The Art Lover, and related writings by Harmon, including The Art Dealer and the Playwright, and Synopsis of Art Lover, ca. 1987-1990 ; a transcript of an interview of Harmon conducted by Karl Fortress, 1967; magazine and newspaper clippings; exhibition announcements and catalogs; and miscellany.

Interviewees include: Dore Ashton, Sally Avery, Alfred Barr, Phillip Bruno, Al Copley, Dorothy Dehner, Bettina Drew (about Nelson Algren), Elsie Driggs (also found is a video interview and transcript of Driggs by Merryman Gatch, n.d.), Ben Hertzberg, Leonard Hutton, Lewis Isaacs, Max Kahn, Katharine Kuh, Johanna Neumann Lamm, Frances Manacher, Peter Neumann, Albrecht Neumann, Nolbert Rothbaum, Margarete Schultz, Joseph Solman, Margarete Sapanel, Hugh Stix, Ilse Vogel with Howard Knotts, and Edward M.M. Warburg.

Bio / His Notes:
Painter and sculptor; New York City. Harmon worked for the influential art dealer J.B. Neumann, and spent several years preparing a biography of him which was never published. As an artist, she lived in Europe in the early part of the century, and worked on WPA art projects in the 1930s.
extent6.0 linear ft.
formatsResearch Files Notes Subject Files Interviews Correspondence
accessUnmicrofilmed: use requires an appointment.
record sourcehttp://www.siris.si.edu/
finding aidPartial box inventory is available.
acquisition informationDonated 1983 and 1998 by Lily Harmon.
updated11/12/2014 11:29:57
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titleGeorge Fedoroff papers, 1944-1979.
repositoryArchives of American Art
collection titleCorrespondence, writings, reports, printed material, exhibition catalogs, and photographs.

REELS 3958-3959: A resume; correspondence with family, friends, and regarding teaching programs in Alaska; notes; writings by Fedoroff, including an autobiography and proposals concerning art in Alaska; writings by others, including "Preservation of Indian Art in Southeastern Alaska" by Katharine Kuh; exhibition announcements and catalogs; clippings; miscellaneous printed material on arts and crafts in Alaska; and photographs of works of art.

REEL 1813: Personal and business correspondence;an unpublished essay, "Arts and Crafts as a Profession," by Fedoroff, 1947; a sketchbook with notes; exhibition catalogs and announcements; clippings; photographs of Fedoroff and his works of art. Also included is a report, "Survey of Alaska Native Arts and Crafts," by William J. Lippincott, 1949.

Bio / His Notes:
Educator and craftsman; Sitka, Alaska. Served as an arts and crafts specialist for the U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of Indian Affairs from 1947-1953 in Sitka.
extent2.4 linear ft. (on 3 microfilm reels)
formatsCorrespondence Writings Printed Materials Microfilm Photographs
accessPatrons must use microfilm copy.
record sourcehttp://www.siris.si.edu/
updated11/12/2014 11:29:57
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titleCorrespondence with Carl Zigrosser, 1937-1968, n.d.
repositoryUniversity of Pennsylvania
collection titleZigrosser’s long and varied career kept him in regular contact with the Art Institute of Chicago and its employees: Daniel Catton Rich, Katherine Kuh, Joachim Harold, Ethelred Abbot, Frederick Sweet, Margaret Gentels, Elaine L. Johnson, Allan McNab, and Lester Bridaham.

The earliest correspondence concerns prints offered by Weyhe Gallery for purchase by the AIC. A large part of the correspondence centers around an exhibition of works by Posada, which originated in Chicago in 1944 and then travelled to Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. There are letters in Spanish from Fernando Gamboa, the Mexican organizer of the exhibition. Zigrosser, knowledgeable about Mexican art, gave a lecture on Posada’s influence during the exhibition’s stay in Chicago. There are long and detailed letters about packing, insuring, and shipping the exhibition. Zigrosser’s interest in Expressionist prints and a loan of Gauguin prints from the Philadelphia Museum of Art are featured in the later letters.

Contained in: Carl Zigrosser Papers, ca. 1891-1971. Folders 87-89.

Location: Rare Book & Ms Library Manuscripts
Call Number: Ms. Coll. 6

LC Subject(s): Posada, José Guadalupe, 1852-1913.
Gauguin, Paul, 1848-1903.

Language(s): In English and Spanish.
Other Contributors: Gamboa, Fernando, 1909-
Rich, Daniel Catton, 1904-1976
Kuh, Katherine.
Joachim, Harold, 1909-1983.
Abbot, Ethelred.
Sweet, Frederick A. (Frederick Arnold), 1903-1984
Gentles, Margaret.
Johnson, Elaine L.
McNab, Allan.
Bridaham, Lester Burbank, 1899-
extent116 boxes
formatsCorrespondence Research Files Writings Photographs Notes
accessIn general, the Carl Zigrosser Papers may be examined by qualified researchers in the reading room of the Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Pennsylvania. Photocopying of Zigrosser materials is at the discretion of the Rare Book and Manuscript Library. The receipt of photocopies does not grant publication rights without the written permission of the University of Pennsylvania and the literary executors of the authors in question.
record sourcehttp://www.franklin.library.upenn.edu
finding aidAvailable in electronic form and in repository.
acquisition informationGift June 1972
updated11/12/2014 11:29:57
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titleOral history interview with Katharine Kuh, 1993 Jan. 26-27.
repositoryArchives of American Art
collection titleOne bound 86 p. transcript of an interview with Katharine Kuh conducted Jan. 26-27, 1993 by John W. Smith for the Art Institute of Chicago.

Bio / His Notes:
Katharine Kuh (1904-1994) was a curator with the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Ill.
extentTranscript: 86 p.
formatsTranscript
accessUse requires an appointment. The Art Institute of Chicago retains copyright.
record sourcehttp://www.siris.si.edu/
acquisition informationDonated in 2009 by John W. Smith, Director of the Archives of American Art. Interview was conducted when Smith was the Archivist for the Art Institute of Chicago. Loc. of Assoc. Material: Katharine Kuh papers also located at the Archives of American Art.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:14
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titleOral history interview with Anne Rorimer, 2010 Nov. 15-16.
repositoryArchives of American Art
collection titleAnne Rorimer (1944-) is a curator and art historian in Chicago, Ill. Judith Olch Richards (1947-) is a former executive director of iCI in New York, NY.

An interview of Anne Rorimer conducted 2010 Nov. 15-16, by Judith Olch Richards, for the Archives of American Art's Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts project, at Rorimer's home, in Chicago, Ill.

Rorimer speaks of her family background; her early life and education in New York City; her father, James Rorimer, and his influence as director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art; college life at Bryn Mawr; how she became interested in modern art; her internship at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London after college; her master's degree thesis on Tony Smith; her job as a curator at the Albright-Knox Gallery and then at the Art Institute of Chicago;memorable exhibitions at the AIC throughout the 1970s and early 1980s, including the annual "American Exhibition," "Europe in the Seventies: Aspects of Recent Art," (1977), and "Idea and Image in Recent Art" (1974); her close relationship with Anne D’Harnoncourt; how she left the AIC in 1984 to write, "New Art in the ‘60s and 70s: Redefining Reality," (2001); her role in acquisitions of contemporary art at the AIC; her thoughts on art education; her work with collectors; the process of getting her book published and reactions to it; her curatorial projects in the 1980s and early 1990s that focused on conceptual art; her relationship with artists like Michael Asher and Daniel Buren; her extensive book collection; her thoughts on being a freelance curator and writer.

She recalls Whitney Stoddard, Robert Beverly Hale, Theodoros Stamos, Leo Castelli, Henry Geldzahler, Anne D'Harnoncourt, Renee Marcuse, Bates Lowry, Tony Smith, Marcia Tucker, A. James Speyer, Bruce Nauman, Lawrence Weiner, Vito Acconci, William Wegman, Robert Morris, Lucy R. Lippard, Katharine Kuh, Sol Lewitt, John Maxon, Eva Hesse, Muriel Newman, Judith Kirschner, Dan Graham, Benjamin Buchloh, and Marcel Broodthaers.
extentSound recording, master: 4 memory cards (5 hr., 35 min.) secure digital; 1.25 in.
formatsSound Recording Interview
accessScheduled for transcription.
record linkhttp://www.aaa.si.edu/collections/interviews/oral-history-interview-anne-rorimer-15880
record sourcehttp://www.siris.si.edu/
acquisition informationThis interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. This interview is part of the Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts Project, funded by a grant from the A G Foundation.
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titleMark Tobey papers, [ca. 1920]-1977.
repositoryArchives of American Art
collection titleBiographical material; correspondence; financial records; Baha'i material; music; writings; art works; printed material; and photographs.

Biographical material includes diaries with sporadic entries, undated and 1958-1959; address books; membership cards, and honorary titles.

Correspondents include Stephen Andrus, Dore Ashton, Arthur G. Barnett, John and Betty Bowen, Adelyn Breeskin, Cliffa Carson (niece), Thomas A. Chew, Lillian Clark, Paul Cummings, Arthur Dahl, Shoghi B. Effendi, Dorothy Elmhirst, Claire Falkenstein, Lyonel Feininger, Janet Flanner, John Ford,Miriam Gabo, Colin Graham, Pehr Hallsten, Pamela Harkins, Nina Harwood, John and Anne Hauberg, Kay Hillman, Joseph Hirshhorn, David Hofman, Carl Holty, Herbert Hoover, Leroy and Silvia Ioas, Berthe P. and Claire Jacobson, Nina Kandinsky, Helen Kendall, Carolyn Kizer, Katherine Kuh,Rene Lauby, Bernard Leach, Gerald Lieberman, Andre Masson, Marjory Masten, George Mathieu,

N. Richard Miller, Joan Miro, Axel Mondell, Alfred Neumeyer, Ben Nicholson, Vincent Price, Mark Ritter, Diego Rivera, Nancy W. Ross, John Russell, Henry Seldis, Charles Seliger, Otto Seligman, Art Smith, James Speyer, Michel Tapie, Miriam Terry, Roland Terry, Juliet Thompson, Kenneth Tyler, Charmion Von Wiegand, Heloise Wardall, Ulfert Wilke, and Marian Willard of the Willard Gallery.

Also found are: notes taken while studying French; financial, legal and medical records; material relating to Baha'i, including credential for Tobey for the Baha'i World Congress, 1963, class notes, photographs, prayer books, and printed material; music, including sheet music by Tobey, recital program, and music by Harold Budd, John Sundsten,and Debussey; writings and poetry by Tobey and Dahl; writings on Tobey;

a transcript of an interview of Tobey conducted by William Seitz; sketches and sketchbooks by Tobey and by others, including Bernard Leach; printed material on Tobey, including reproductions of work, exhibition catalogs and announcements, magazine articles, and clippings; and printed material on others, including Hallsten, Leach, Seliger, Feininger, Abraham Walkowitz, Alberto Burri, and Jules Pascin.

Also included are photographs of: Tobey, Tobey with family and friends, exhibition installations, works of art, an album containing photos, sketches and notes, ca. 1920-1950, an album of photos of Tobey's Seattle studio taken after his death by Kenneth Tomlinson, 1976, and miscellaneous photographs.

Bio / His Notes:
Painter; Abstract Expressionist. Also worked as fashion illustrator, portrait painter. Born in Wisconsin, December 11, 1892. Died 1976.

Worked in Chicago, Seattle, Basel, Switzerland; New York, N.Y., Dartington Hall, Devonshire, England, and Paris. Convert to Baha'i religion.
extent11 microfilm reels. reels 3200-3210
formatsCorrespondence Financial Records Works of Art Writings Photographs
accessPatrons must use microfilm copy.
record sourcehttp://www.siris.si.edu/
acquisition informationLent for microfilming 1984 by the Seattle Art Museum. Location of Original: Originals in: Seattle Art Museum, Seattle, Washington.
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titleMark Tobey Papers, circa 1850-1985
repositoryUniversity of Washington Libraries
collection titleAccession No. 3593-001
Mark Tobey papers, 1945-1977
.56 cubic foot
Biographical features, correspondence, gallery notices, exhibition catalogs, clippings, photographs.
Photographs are 8" x 10" black & white copies; all are of his work, except two.

Accession No. 3593-002
Mark Tobey papers, circa 1923-1976
10.00 cubic feet
Scope and Content
Correspondence, writings, diaries, music, gallery notices, photographs, clippings, ephemera

Accession No. 3593-003
Mark Tobey papers, 1931-1975
14.69 cubic feet
Scope and Content
Correspondence, art works by Tobey and others, exhibition catalogs and posters, photographs and negatives, writings, phonodisc, memorabilia.
Art works from Tobey estate are those considered not exhibit quality by the Seattle Art Museum. Many are untitled and unidentified. Art works by unidentified artists are listed by dimensions only. Measurements are approximate, in inches, and for the most part are outer dimensions.
Negatives of photographs were for use of the Foster White Gallery in its exhibition of Jan 1990. Each negative has been placed with the original photograph.
Restrictions on Access
Access restricted: For terms of access, contact Special Collections.
Other Finding Aids
Inventory/container list available in Special Collections.

Accession No. 3593-004
Mark Tobey papers, 1944-1985
.28 cubic foot
Scope and Content
Exhibition catalogs, gallery notices.
All the catalogs and notices are regarding Mark Tobey. They were given to Marshall Hatch by the Willard Gallery in New York City, which sold Tobey's work from about 1943 until the gallery closed in 1986.
Restrictions on Access
Open to all users.
Acquisition Info
Donated by Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Hatch, 2/11/1988.

Accession No. 3593-006
Mark Tobey Papers papers, circa 1850-1978
2.00 cubic feet
Scope and Content
Photographs; 1850s-1978, many have no date.
Includes several hundred photographs of Tobey, others, Tobey family members, and Tobey art works. See inventory.
Restrictions on Access
Access restricted: For terms of access, contact Special Collections.
Acquisition Info
Donated by Tobey Estate, 11/19/1988.

Accession No. 3593-008
Mark Tobey painting, 1935
.33 cubic foot (1 oversize package)
Scope and Content
Painting by Mark Tobey, "Untitled (Landscape)".
Painting is tempera on paper, mounted on board; dimensions are 7.25" x 18.5".
Restrictions on Access
Access restricted: For terms of access, contact Special Collections.
Restrictions on Use
Creator's literary rights not transferred to the University of Washington Libraries.
Acquisition Info
Donated by Seattle Art Museum, 3/23/1993.

Accession No. 3593-009
Mark Tobey recordings
1 phonograph record; 1 sound cassette
Scope and Content
Phonograph recording and audiocassette dub of it, of music composed by Mark Tobey.
Note: the phondisc label has misspelled words in the titles; contents should read "Aubade", "Memories are Hunting Horns", and "Hommage a Windsor Utley". The flautist for all three selections was Windsor Utley.
Restrictions on Access
Open to all users. Access to archival recordings: Due to the fragility of archival tape recordings, potential users may be required to arrange for transfer to digital format before the material can be accessed. Please contact Special Collections for further information.
Restrictions on Use
Creator's literary rights not transferred to the University of Washington Libraries.
Acquisition Info
Donated by John Gibbs, 2/23/1994.

Accession No. 3593-010
Mark Tobey musical compositions, 1952-1957
.21 cubic foot (2 volumes: 80 pages)
Scope and Content
Musical compositions consisting of piano sketches and composition exercises.
Restrictions on Access
Open to all users.
Restrictions on Use
Creator's literary rights not transferred to the University of Washington Libraries.
Acquisition Info
Donated by Arthur Barnett, 3/31/1994.

Accession No. 3593-011
Mark Tobey design, before 1977
.03 cubic foot (1 folder)
Scope and Content
Linoleum block designed for the Washington State Theatre; n.d.
Restrictions on Access
Open to all users.
Restrictions on Use
Creator's literary rights not transferred to the University of Washington Libraries.
Acquisition Info
Donated by W.U. Libraries, 6/11/1996.

Accession No. 3593-012
Mark Tobey papers, 1956-1970
.21 cubic foot (1 box)
Scope and Content
Correspondence between Mark Tobey and Dolores and Mark McColm, and rental contract for a house rented by Tobey at 5220 University Way in Seattle. Also includes clippings.
Restrictions on Access
Open to all users.
Restrictions on Use
Creator's literary rights not transferred to the University of Washington Libraries.
Acquisition Info
Donated by Marshall Hatch, 2/24/1986.

Accession No. 3593-013
Mark Tobey disc recordings , 1957
.04 cubic feet (3 disc recordings including 1 ten-inch sound disc, 33 1/3 rpm; 2 twelve-inch sound discs, 78 rpm)
Scope and Content
Phonograph records, including one 33 1/3 rpm disc containing three flute pieces composed by Mark Tobey, "Aubade", "Memories are Hunting Horns", and "Hommage a Windsor Utley", all played by John Wummer, flautist. Also present are two 78 rpm discs labelled "American Art Festival, sides 1,2,3,and 4, Mark Tobey and Lloyd Goodrich." Mark Tobey's autograph appears on the record labels of the American Art Festival discs. Only side 4 is dated; October 15, 1957.
Restrictions on Access
Open to all users.
Acquisition Info
Donated by Wesley Wehr, 4/25/1997.

Accession No. 3593-014
Mark Tobey papers, circa 1930-1939
.03 cubic feet (1 Vertical file)
Scope and Content
Drawings (one with music manuscript), exhibit catalogs. They date from the 1930's and several were previously owned by dancer Louise Soelberg, a friend of Tobey.
Restrictions on Access
Open to all users.
Restrictions on Use
May be copied and quoted.
Acquisition Info
Donated by Basil Langton, 3/30/2000.

Biographical Note
Mark Tobey was born in Wisconsin in 1890 and raised in Wisconsin and Indiana. His only formal art training was painting classes at the Art Institute of Chicago while he was in high school. Tobey's artistic career began in Chicago as an illustrator for fashion catalogs. After moving to Greenwich Village in 1911, he worked briefly as a fashion illustrator for McCalls magazine. During his early years in New York, Tobey also drew charcoal portraits and in the 1920s became known for his theater caricatures and drawings of vaudeville and burlesque figures. In 1918, Tobey accepted the Baha'i faith. He remained active in Baha'i circles throught the rest of his life. Baha'i exerted an important influence on Tobey's work, providing him with aesthetic as well as religious principles. In 1922 Tobey moved to Seattle and accepted a job teaching art classes at the Cornish School.

For the next 38 years, despite long absences in New York and Europe, he made Seattle his home. In Seattle, he was first exposed to the art of the Far East when, in 1923, he met Teng Kuei, a young Chinese artist who taught him Chinese brushwork. In 1930, Tobey moved to Dartington Hall, a progressive school of the arts in England where he taught until 1938. In 1934 Tobey visited China and Japan and spent a month in a Zen monastery. Scholars have seen a connection between Tobey's sojurn in the Orient and the evolution of his mature style. In 1934, the fledgling Seattle Art Museum presented a one man show of Tobey's works.

With the outbreak of war imminent in Europe, Tobey returned to Seattle in 1938 and worked on the WPA Federal Art Project. The 1940s were a productive time for Tobey in Seattle; in 1941 he began piano and music theory lessons.

Tobey lived in Paris from October 1954 to June 1955, and in 1960 he moved to Basel, Switzerland. Throught the 1960s and early 1970s Tobey continued to paint and achieve international recognition. Tobey died in 1976.

extent28.38 cubic feet
formatsCorrespondence Exhibition Files Exhibition Catalogs Clippings Photographs
accessSome materials are restricted: For terms of access, contact Special Collections.
record sourcehttp://www.lib.washington.edu/SpecialColl/findaids/docs/papersrecords/TobeyMark3593.xml
finding aidGuide in repository and online.
acquisition informationAccession No. 3593-001 - Received 1/1/1983. Accession No. 3593-002 - Donated by Seattle Art Museum, 3/27/1985. Accession No. 3593-004 - Donated by Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Hatch, 2/11/1988. Accession No. 3593-006 - Donated by Tobey Estate, 11/19/1988. Accession No. 3593-008 - Donated by Seattle Art Museum, 3/23/1993. Accession No. 3593-009 - Donated by John Gibbs, 2/23/1994. Accession No. 3593-010 - Donated by Arthur Barnett, 3/31/1994. Accession No. 3593-011 - Donated by W.U. Libraries, 6/11/1996. Accession No. 3593-012 - Donated by Marshall Hatch, 2/24/1986. Accession No. 3593-013 - Donated by Wesley Wehr, 4/25/1997. Accession No. 3593-014 - Donated by Basil Langton, 3/30/2000.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:15
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