Archives Directory for the History of Collecting in America

Archives related to: Ferus Gallery (Los Angeles, Calif.)

titleBetty Asher papers, 1860-1999.
repositoryThe Getty Research Institute
collection titleThe Betty Asher papers, including letters, photographs, posters, press clippings, collection records, and tea cup postcards, give a vivid sense of the Michael and Asher families, Betty Asher as collector, and the Los Angeles art world of the postwar years.

Series I contains over 700 photographs, including formal studio portraits, color snapshots, baby albums and twenty photographs of the Asher family residence taken by Julius Shulman. Documenting Asher’s collecting interests are approximately 200 photographs of her art collection, part of which has now been donated to local museums, and part of which was sold at auction. Her ceramics and cup collection is also photo-documented. Many of these photographs depict pieces as they were originally installed in different areas of the various Asher homes.

Several black and white and color photographs document the exhibition Limited Works by Important Artists (known as the "Multiples show") held at the Egg and the Eye Gallery in 1966. The exhibition featured Pop art prints, books, sculpture, ceramics and games by Andy Warhol, Ed Ruscha, and Robert Watts, among others.

More than 200 photographs of Los Angeles gallery openings and art parties at Asher’s home in Los Angeles from the 1960s to the 1990s highlight her presence in the Southern California art scene, along with other pivotal figures such as Irving Blum, Stephanie Barron, Stanley and Elise Grinstein, and Patricia Faure.

Series II includes family letters and professional correspondence not cataloged in individual artist files, as well as official documents, such as birth and marriage certificates, and business contracts. Asher’s favorite recipes are also preserved in this series.

Business files in Series III include loan forms and invoices, chronicling the amassing of Asher’s collections of art and teacups. Also included is Asher’s collection of more than 1200 cup postcards in Series IV. Series V pertains to exhibitions of Asher’s cup collection.

The Artist Files in Series VI include a wealth of material that traces Asher’s strong relationships with artists, which developed in tandem with her collecting activities. Asher’s artist files contain letters, postcards and gifts from artists such as George Herms, Dan Flavin, Joe Goode, Emerson Woelffer, William Copley, and Bruce Conner.

A significant portion of the archive includes gallery announcements and over 300 posters, many of them signed by artists such as Billy Al Bengston and Edward Kienholz. Eighty of these posters are original announcements from the Ferus Gallery and Irving Blum gallery. Printed matter, such as clippings and announcements, when not included in the above series, may be found in Series VII.

Biographical or Historical Notes:
Betty Asher, trained as a nurse, became an important Los Angeles art collector and dealer, known for her contemporary art and cup collections.
extent69.6 linear ft.
formatsBusiness Papers Personal Papers Photographs Artist Files Printed Materials
accessOpen for use by qualified researchers.
record linkhttp://archives2.getty.edu:8082/xtf/view?docId=ead/2009.M.30/2009.M.30.xml;query=;brand=default
record sourcehttp://primo.getty.edu/primo_library/libweb/action/dlDisplay.do?vid=GRI&afterPDS=true&institution=01GRI&docId=GETTY_ALMA21127955270001551
finding aidPreliminary inventory available in the repository; folder level control.
acquisition informationGift of Michael Asher.
updated05/12/2022 11:10:00
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titleModern Art in Los Angeles and Pacific Standard Time recordings, 2003-2012.
repositoryThe Getty Research Institute
collection titleMaterials principally comprise audiovisual recordings of oral history interviews, public conversations, and lectures from 2003 to 2012, generated by the Getty Research Institute (GRI) through its Modern Art in Los Angeles and Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. initiatives.

The materials include some supporting documentation such as transcripts, photographs, and ephemera. The interviews and events were conducted to record leading artists, filmmakers, musicians, curators, and critics as they discuss their contributions to Los Angeles' vibrant postwar (1945-1980) art scene.

Bio./Hist. Note:
The Getty Research Institute (GRI) is a program developed and overseen by the J. Paul Getty Trust. The GRI initiated and sponsored the Modern Art in Los Angeles project and the closely-related Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. project in an effort to collect, document, and preserve the art historical records of postwar (1945 to 1980) Los Angeles through archival acquisitions, oral history interviews, public programming, exhibitions, and publications. Both projects include a series of public programs, including lectures, symposia, performance art, theater, concerts, readings, film screenings, oral histories, and public conversations, in which leading artists, filmmakers, musicians, curators, and critics discuss their contributions to Los Angeles' vibrant postwar art scene.

While the Modern Art in Los Angeles activities are specific to the Getty Research Institute, Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. is a collaborative project, including over 60 cultural institutions from around Southern California. From 2011 to 2012 the J. Paul Getty Museum presented a major exhibition, titled Crosscurrents in L.A.: Painting and Sculpture, 1950-1970 as part of the project.

extent17.1 linear feet
formatsSound Recording
accessRequest access to the physical materials described in this inventory through the catalog record at library catalog record for this collection and click "Place Request." Click here for general library access policy. See the Administrative Information section of this finding aid for access restrictions specific to the records described below. Please note, some of the records may be stored off site; advanced notice is required for access to these materials.
record linkhttp://archives2.getty.edu:8082/xtf/view?docId=ead/IA40018/IA40018.xml
record sourcehttp://primo.getty.edu/primo_library/libweb/action/dlDisplay.do?vid=GRI&afterPDS=true&institution=01GRI&docId=GETTY_ALMA21113723680001551
finding aidFinding aid; Available in the repository; Item level control.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:17
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titleCharles Brittin papers, bulk 1950-1975.
repositoryThe Getty Research Institute
collection titleThe Charles Brittin papers contain photographs, negatives, slides and transparencies documenting the Los Angeles art scene and social and political movements that occurred from the 1950s through the 1970s.

The archive is rich with photographs of Wallace Berman and his Ferus Gallery coterie, including Bob Alexander, George Herms, Walter Hopps, Artie Richer, John Altoon, Zack and Beverly Walsh, John Reed and Dean Stockwell, as well as Berman's Semina Art Gallery in Larkspur, California.
Among Brittin's photographs of civil rights protests, the activities of the Congress of Racial Equality and the Black Panther Party are particularly well documented. Notable among Brittin's photographs of Vietnam War protests are his images of the Artists' Tower of Protest in Los Angeles.

Also included are photographs of sites in old Los Angeles and Venice that are no longer extant, and personal photographs of Brittin's family, friends, and travels.

Accompanying Brittin's photographs are correspondence, personal writings, printed ephemera, posters, maquettes, clippings, and publications. The archive also includes works of art by Brittin, and collages, assemblage art, mail art and other works by artists such as Bob Alexander, Wallace Berman and George Herms. Five boxes contain Brittin's collections of erotica, advertisements, theater and film ephemera, and other materials..

Bio/History:
Charles Brittin (1928-2011) was an American photographer, artist and political activist based in Los Angeles.

extent92 linear feet
formatsPhotographs Negatives Slides Correspondence Writings
accessOpen for use by qualified researchers.
record linkhttp://archives2.getty.edu:8082/xtf/view?docId=ead/2005.M.11/2005.M.11.xml;query=;brand=default
record sourcehttp://primo.getty.edu/primo_library/libweb/action/dlDisplay.do?vid=GRI&afterPDS=true&institution=01GRI&docId=GETTY_ALMA21127108810001551
updated11/12/2014 11:30:17
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titleBilly Al Bengston papers, circa 1940s-1989, (bulk 1968-1988)
repositoryArchives of American Art
collection title* Materials related to Ronald Feldman Fine Arts found in Box 7 Folder 46.

Billy Al Bengston was an artist born in Dodge City, Kansas on June 7, 1934. After moving back and forth from Kansas to California multiple times, he and his family settled in Los Angeles in 1948.

The papers of Billy Al Bengston measure 10.2 linear feet and date from circa 1940s to 1989, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1960 to 1988. The collection documents the life and work of the southern California artist through biographical materials, correspondence, personal business records, gallery and museum files, teaching files, project and commission files, scattered artwork, printed materials, and photographs.

Found within the biographical materials series are three feet of calendars which extensively document Bengston's personal and professional activities for fourteen years, and include ephemera related to these activities. This series also includes health records, wills, and passports.

Correspondence is with galleries, museums, universities, businesses, friends, and colleagues, and primarily concerns exhibitions, sales, consignments, commissions, and Bengston's personal finances. Bengston's relationship with the James Corcoran Gallery, Janie C. Lee Gallery, John Berggruen Gallery, Martha Jackson Gallery, and Texas Gallery are well-documented here, as well as in the Museum and Gallery Files series. Also found is a limited amount of personal correspondence with collectors, researchers, and friends. A few letters from other artists, including Peter Plagens and a letter from Richard Diebenkorn are interfiled here.

Bengston's professional relationships with galleries, museums, and universities are well-documented in the gallery and museum files, including the galleries mentioned above, Ferus Gallery, and others. Lists of consignments and prices, invoices, records of sales, loan agreement forms, shipping receipts, exhibition checklists, and exhibition floor plans provide information about sales, exhibitions, and loans. A few files provide further information about Bengston teaching activities. His personal business records include art sales records, price lists, lists of purchases, records of investment, and personal finance records. Project files include correspondence, notes, and printed materials related to Bengston's commissions for artwork and personal projects, including a book he worked on with Ed Ruscha, Business Cards.

Writings by Bengston include responses to exhibitions of West Coast art and his thoughts on his career, art, the artistic community, motorcycles, as well as a recollection of John Altoon. Also found are questionnaires sent out by Bengston for an art survey, with responses from Peter Alexander, Carl Andre, John Chamberlain, Dan Flavin, Joe Goode, Robert Graham, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Motherwell, Ed Ruscha, and others. Writings by others consist primarily of exhibition catalog essays, manuscripts of interviews with Bengston, and other writings about Bengston. Also found is an essay by Walter Hopps. Photographs of Bengston include a family picture from the 1940s, Bengston at work on projects in Los Angeles and Syracuse, New York, and Bengston at social events. Other photographs consist of pictures of friends and artists, Bengston's artwork, documentary evidence of damaged artwork, and of commission sites.

Printed materials from the 1960s - 1980s include clippings, full articles, exhibition announcements and catalogs, and posters. They document exhibitions, art in southern California, and society and art events. The collection houses limited amounts of artwork including sketches, cut-outs, doodles and drawings.

Arrangement and Series Description

The collection is arranged into 10 series:

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1958-1987 (Boxes 1-4, 11; 3.7 linear feet)
Series 2: Correspondence, 1966-1989 (Boxes 4-6; 1.75 linear feet)
Series 3: Gallery and Museum Files, 1961-1989 (Boxes 6-7; 1.5 linear feet)
Series 4: Teaching Records, 1968-1982 (Box 7; 7 folders)
Series 5: Personal Business Records, circa 1960-1987 (Boxes 7-8; 1.0 linear foot)
Series 6: Project Files, 1968-1987 (Boxes 8-9; 0.25 linear feet)
Series 7: Writings, 1967-circa 1988 (Box 9, OV 1; 0.25 linear feet)
Series 8: Artwork, 1960s-1987 (Box 9; 7 folders)
Series 9: Printed Materials, 1958-1988 (Boxes 9-10, OV 1-2; 1.25 linear feet)
Series 10: Photographs, circa 1940s-1987 (Box 10; 0.5 linear feet)
extent10.2 linear feet and datinge from circa 1940s to 1989, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1960 to 1988
formatsPersonal Papers Correspondence Business Papers Artist Files Artwork
accessThe collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
record linkhttp://www.aaa.si.edu/collections/billy-al-bengston-papers-10220
record sourcehttp://www.aaa.si.edu
finding aidavailable in the archive and online at http://www.aaa.si.edu/collections/billy-al-bengston-papers-10220/more
acquisition informationThe collection was donated to the Archives of American Art by Billy Al Bengston in 1990. The collection received a preliminary level of processing at some point after donation. The entire collection was fully processed, arranged, and described by Michael Yates in 2007 with funding provided by the Getty Foundation.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:17
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titleFerus Gallery fliers and photograph, 1958-1966.
repositoryThe Getty Research Institute
collection titleFifty-six fliers and one invitation on 53 mounts, together with one photographic print, represent 53 exhibitions that took place at Ferus Gallery, Los Angeles between 1958 and 1966.

The fliers were designed by Irving Blum. The photograph by William Claxton shows Ed Moses, John Altoon, Billy Al Bengston and Irving Blum in front of Ferus Gallery in 1959.

extentca. 2 linear ft.
formatsEphemera Photographs
accessUnprocessed collection; contact repository for information regarding access.
record sourcehttp://primo.getty.edu/primo_library/libweb/action/dlDisplay.do?vid=GRI&afterPDS=true&institution=01GRI&docId=GETTY_ALMA21126326260001551
finding aidPreliminary inventory available in the repository; item level control.
acquisition informationGift of Irving Blum.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:17
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titleClare Spark interviews with artists, curators, and intellectuals [sound recording], 1969-1981.
repositoryThe Getty Research Institute
collection titleBetween 1969 and 1974, Clare Spark produced a series of radio programs for KPFK-FM (many under the title of "The Sour Apple Tree") that engaged with intellectuals and leading figures in the art world, including Irving Blum, Hans Haacke, Roy Lichtenstein, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Donald Barthelme, Allan Kaprow, Judy Chicago, Francois Truffaut, John Lennon, Robert Rauschenberg, Henry Geldzahler and many others.

Programs sometimes focused on individual figures, but they also covered broad issues and events of concern to the arts community, including the Art Workers Coalition, the founding of the Woman's Building, the closing of Ferus Gallery, the activities of museum boards, the rise of Feminism and media studies as disciplines, and public reactions to major exhibitions. This archive is Spark's surviving copies of the finished radio broadcasts, as well as some of her unedited interviews.

Biographical and Historical Note
Sparks career at KPFK, where she eventually became Program Director, continued until 1982. After 1974, Spark's programming interests shifted more towards history, politics, and music; this collection only includes her materials related to artists and intellectuals.
extent34 audiotapes; 30 sound tape reels; 45 audiocassettes
formatsSound Recording
accessPartially processed collection; unavailable until processing is complete. Audio visual materials are unavailable until reformatted.
record sourcehttp://primo.getty.edu/primo_library/libweb/action/dlDisplay.do?vid=GRI&afterPDS=true&institution=01GRI&docId=GETTY_ALMA21127971980001551
updated11/12/2014 11:30:17
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titleSandra Leonard Starr papers related to California assemblage art
repositoryThe Getty Research Institute
collection titleThe collection contains Starr's papers related to her 1988 exhibition and catalog titled Lost and Found in California: Four Decades of Assemblage Art.

Included are her research files on artists, production material for the exhibition and publication, and audio recordings and transcripts of Starr's interviews with 12 significant figures in the California art scene from 1940 to 1987, such as artists Robert Alexander, Cameron, Richard Diebenkorn, George Herms, and Edward Kienholz.

extent4.2 linear feet
formatsOral History Research Files Notes Writings
accessOpen for use by qualified researchers with the exception of audio recordings, which are unavailable until reformatted.
record linkhttp://archives2.getty.edu:8082/xtf/view?docId=ead/2011.M.22/2011.M.22.xml
record sourcehttp://primo.getty.edu/primo_library/libweb/action/dlDisplay.do?vid=GRI&afterPDS=true&institution=01GRI&docId=GETTY_ALMA21140311160001551
acquisition informationGift of Sandra Leonard Starr.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:17
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titleNotebook of Cameron.
repositoryThe Getty Research Institute
collection titleMarjorie Cameron's comb-bound volume contains sketches, abstract compositions in ink and wash, figure and architectural studies, handwritten poems and drafts of letters. Some of the notebook's content appears to be concurrent with the 1957 Wallace Berman exhibition at Ferus Gallery in Los Angeles.

Notes:
The notebook sheds light on the artistic process of painter and draftsman Cameron, who was a follower of the esoteric mysticism of Aleister Crowley and his philosophical group, the OTO (Ordo Templi Orientis), and a mentor to artists and poets, such as Wallace Berman, George Herms, and David Meltzer.

Title from front cover.
Given by Marjorie Cameron to Samson de Brier; upon the death of Samson in 1995 inherited by his nephew, Tony de Brier; Tony donated it with other contents of Samson's estate to Jean Ferro, friend of Samson and Cameron; acquired by the Getty Research Institute from Jean Ferro in 2012.

extent1 v.
formatsPrinted Materials
accessOpen for use by qualified researchers.
record sourcehttp://primo.getty.edu/primo_library/libweb/action/dlDisplay.do?vid=GRI&afterPDS=true&institution=01GRI&docId=GETTY_ALMA21135658670001551
updated11/12/2014 11:30:17
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titleJay DeFeo letters to Clinton Hill and Allen Tran, 1954-1963
repositoryThe Getty Research Institute
collection titleThe collection contains seven letters and one inscribed gallery invitation from Jay DeFeo to artist Clinton Hill and his partner, Allen Tran, documenting DeFeo's early career in Berkeley, San Francisco and Florence, Italy.

Among the highlights are detailed descriptions of DeFeo's working environment, including a small sketch of the layout of one studio and apartment. She also discusses her artwork, exhibitions, and personal relationships.

Bio./Hist. Note:
Artist Mary Joan (Jay) DeFeo was born in Hanover, New Hampshire in 1929 and moved with her family to the San Francisco Bay Area at age three. She earned a B.A. and an M.A. in Fine Arts at UC Berkeley and won a fellowship after graduation that took her to France, Spain, northern Africa and Italy. In Florence she met artist Clinton Hill, with whom she developed a lasting friendship.

In the mid-1950s DeFeo settled in San Francisco and met regularly with Beat poets and artists including Joan and William Brown, Sonia Gechtoff and Michael McClure. She became associated with artists such as Wallace Berman, George Herms, Bruce Conner, Ed Kienholz and her husband, Wally Hedrick.

Influenced by their experimentation with found images, DeFeo applied a similar aesthetic to her mixed media paintings using newspaper, gouache, graphite and tempera. She later worked with photography and photo-collage. DeFeo had her first solo exhibition in 1954 at The Place, a cafe in San Francisco's North Beach. Her work was also shown in Walter Hopps's Action I group show at the Santa Monica Pier in 1955, and at other venues including Dilexi Gallery in San Francisco and Ferus Gallery in Los Angeles.

Her best-known painting is "The Rose" (1958-1966), a 2,300-pound canvas that took nearly a decade to complete. DeFeo died in 1989.

extent0.5 linear ft.
formatsCorrespondence
accessOpen for use by qualified researchers.
record sourcehttp://primo.getty.edu/primo_library/libweb/action/dlDisplay.do?vid=GRI&afterPDS=true&institution=01GRI&docId=GETTY_ALMA21139492590001551
finding aidPreliminary inventory available in the repository; item level control.
acquisition informationGift of Clinton Hill / Allen Tran Trust.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:17
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titleEdward Ruscha photographs of Los Angeles streets, 1974-2010.
repositoryThe Getty Research Institute
collection titleThe collection is comprised of Edward Ruscha's ongoing photographic documentation of Los Angeles thoroughfares.

This material demonstrates Ruscha's interest in producing an almost comprehensive representation of the city's main streets. Included are shoots of three streets made in the 1970s: Santa Monica Boulevard and Pacific Coast Highway, 1974; and Melrose Avenue, 1975; and over 40 streets shot since 2007. These later shoots represent more than twenty-five streets including Sepulveda, Pico, Olympic, Wilshire, La Cienega, and Beverly Boulevards. Some shoots record groups or "suites" of streets such as the Chinatown, La Brea, and Silverlake areas.

The shoots from the 1970s are represented primarily by strip negatives and corresponding [?] contact sheets (approximately 10,500 negatives and circa 100 contact sheets containing approximately 9,800 frames). Documentation consists primarily of relevant pages photocopied from the production notebooks found in box 7 of the Getty Research Institute's companion collection, Edward Ruscha Photographs of Sunset Boulevard and Hollywood Boulevard, 1965-2000, accession number 2012.R.1.

From 2007 onward Ruscha generally shot a street over a period of two days. Each day is represented by a negative reel (49 reels total). The two negative reels for each day were then combined by the Los Angeles film lab FotoKem in a single positive reel (24 reels total). Documentation for each shoot consists primarily of cue and footage sheets and invoices from the FotoKem labs.

Arrangement

Biographical and Historical Note
The American artist Edward Joseph Ruscha IV was born in Omaha, Nebraska on December 16, 1937, and raised in Oklahoma City. He graduated from Chouinard Art Institute (now California Institute of the Arts) in 1960; Robert Irwin and Emerson Woelffer were among the teachers who had an especially strong influence on him. In 1962 his work was included in New painting of common objects, the first exhibition of Pop Art, curated by Walter Hopps at the Pasadena Art Museum.

The following year Hopps gave Ruscha his first solo show at Ferus Gallery, Los Angeles. Informed by Pop Art and the distinctive billboard culture of Los Angeles, Ruscha went on to become a pivital presence in the West Coast and Conceptual art scenes. Known for the drawings and paintings of words and phrases that he began making in the 1960s, as well as for his photographic artist's books, Ruscha is one of the pre-eminent artists of his generation. He has exhibited widely in the United States and abroad.

extent35 linear ft.
formatsPhotographs Negatives Notes
accessOpen for use by qualified researchers. Film negative and positive reels are unavailable due to conservation concerns
record linkhttp://archives2.getty.edu:8082/xtf/view?docId=ead/2012.M.2/2012.M.2.xml
record sourcehttp://primo.getty.edu/primo_library/libweb/action/dlDisplay.do?vid=GRI&afterPDS=true&institution=01GRI&docId=GETTY_ALMA21131525220001551
acquisition informationPromised gift of Ed Ruscha.
updated11/12/2014 11:30:17
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titleEdward Ruscha photographs of Sunset Boulevard and Hollywood Boulevard, 1965-2010.
repositoryThe Getty Research Institute
collection titleThe collection is comprised of material related to Ed Ruscha's photographic documentation of two major Los Angeles thoroughfares, Sunset Boulevard and Hollywood Boulevard, which Ruscha recorded using a motorized camera mounted on a tripod in the bed of his pickup truck. Materials pertaining to the projects that resulted from the shoots is also included.

Between 1965 and 2001 Ruscha documented Sunset Boulevard in twelve shoots that covered the twenty-five mile length of Sunset Boulevard and included both sides of the street. Series I. Sunset Boulevard, contains approximately 5,000 original negatives and 90 contact sheets (circa 10,380 frames) from the 1966, 1976, and 1998 shoots; the original film rolls (on seven negative and seven positive rolls) from the seven shoots made between 1973 and 1997 (excluding 1976); the 2000 and 2001 shoots present as six videotapes; and corresponding documentation. It also contains the production materials for his 1966 book Every building on the Sunset Strip and his 1995 portfolio Sunset Strip 1965/1995, produced with the art dealer and gallerist Patrick Painter in 1995.

Materials pertaining to the book span from negatives and contact sheets from the earliest documentation attempts (circa 1965) to Jerry McMillan's 1965 preliminary contact prints and mock-ups, to the finished book. Included are circa 800 negatives and 64 contact sheets, Ruscha's mock-ups and maquettes, proofs, press pulls, and proof and final copies of the book, and a record book containing lists of expenses for shooting and printing and lists of books both gifted and sold. The later portfolio is represented by negatives and prints used for selecting the final images or test shots, "scratched" (i.e. altered) negatives and prints, and a small amount of documentation pertaining to the project.

Series II. Hollywood Boulevard, contains materials resulting from Ruscha's documentation of that thoroughfare between 1973 and 2004. The four shoots (1973, 2002, 2003, and 2004) covered twelve miles and included both the north and south sides of the street. Included are the original 1973 still images (circa 4,600 negatives and 29 contact sheets containing circa 4,500 frames) and the later images shot on still film (circa 14,000 negatives and two positive film reels) and video (2 videos), as well as documentation pertaining to the original shoot.

Still images from all of the shoots are also compiled on CDs. In 2005 the German publisher and master printer, Gerhard Steidl, published Then & now: Hollywood Boulevard 1973-2004, in both a limited edition portfolio and as a trade book. Also included in Series II are the production materials for this project, ranging from index prints, initial layouts, proof sheets, and dummies, to examples of the final products. Documentation includes maps, street name and numbering systems, image sequence lists, and memos on working and production procedures.

Biographical and Historical Note
The American artist Edward Joseph Ruscha IV was born in Omaha, Nebraska on December 16, 1937, and raised in Oklahoma City. He graduated from Chouinard Art Institute (now California Institute of the Arts) in 1960; Robert Irwin and Emerson Woelffer were among the teachers who had an especially strong influence on him. In 1962 his work was included in New painting of common objects, the first exhibition of Pop Art, curated by Walter Hopps at the Pasadena Art Museum.

The following year Hopps gave Ruscha his first solo show at Ferus Gallery, Los Angeles. Informed by Pop Art and the distinctive billboard culture of Los Angeles, Ruscha went on to become a pivital presence in the West Coast and Conceptual art scenes. Known for the drawings and paintings of words and phrases that he began making in the 1960s, as well as for his photographic artist's books, Ruscha is one of the pre-eminent artists of his generation. He has exhibited widely in the United States and abroad.

extent71.6 linear ft.
formatsVideo recording
accessOpen for use by qualified researchers. Audio-visual materials unavailable until reformatting is complete. Film negatives unavailable due to conservation concerns.
record linkhttp://archives2.getty.edu:8082/xtf/view?docId=ead/2012.M.1/2012.M.1.xml
record sourcehttp://primo.getty.edu/primo_library/libweb/action/dlDisplay.do?vid=GRI&afterPDS=true&institution=01GRI&docId=GETTY_ALMA21131572560001551
updated11/12/2014 11:30:17
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